theater company – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:07:21 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png theater company – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 Lecturer Kitty Dubin Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Playwriting Donated to OU – 2022 – School of Music, Theater & Dance – News – OU Magazine https://acotonline.org/lecturer-kitty-dubin-celebrates-25th-anniversary-of-playwriting-donated-to-ou-2022-school-of-music-theater-dance-news-ou-magazine/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:07:21 +0000 https://acotonline.org/lecturer-kitty-dubin-celebrates-25th-anniversary-of-playwriting-donated-to-ou-2022-school-of-music-theater-dance-news-ou-magazine/ Kitty Dubin is celebrating her 25th birthday this year by teaching playwriting classes at Oakland University. She established the first class in 1997 and now teaches beginner and advanced classes, which are offered through both the School of Music, Theater and Dance and the Creative Writing program, which is part of the Department of English. […]]]>

Kitty Dubin is celebrating her 25th birthday this year by teaching playwriting classes at Oakland University. She established the first class in 1997 and now teaches beginner and advanced classes, which are offered through both the School of Music, Theater and Dance and the Creative Writing program, which is part of the Department of English.

“There were no playwriting classes at Oakland University in 1997,” Dubin said. “I thought the OU could benefit from such a class, and I was convinced that I was well suited for the position, but first I had to convince Michael Gillespie, then President of the School of Music , theater and dance (SMTD) that I was up to the task.

Kitty Dubin

At the time, Dubin had a master’s degree in English, a year-long graduate course in playwriting, and several of his own plays had been produced at Michigan equity theaters, including The Purple Rose and The Jewish. Ensemble Theatre, as well as The Live Oak Theater in Austin, Texas.

“I felt I had a solid grasp of the craft of playwriting, plus a decade of experience as a professional playwright,” she said.

After several tries, Dubin was finally able to convince Gillespie to allow him to teach his first playwriting class in the winter of 1997. At first, the class was only worth two credits and met one evening a week. Eighteen theater students signed up for the course, and it was an immediate success.

“These students saw that there was a connection between playwriting and their other theatrical studies like acting and directing,” Dubin said.

Due to the initial success, playwriting was expanded to a four-credit class, and then it was cross-listed to the English department. Subsequently, an advanced class was added as there was a demand for those who wanted to continue studying playwriting.

“I received another significant increase in enrollment in 2011 when the English department developed a new major in creative writing,” Dubin said. “The playwriting classes now met the requirements for this major, which brought additional students into my classes.”

Dubin brings both his passion and decades of experience as a playwright to his class. She emphasizes the importance of creating solid structure, relatable characters, and natural-sounding dialogue. It also replicates the development process followed by professional playwrights after completing a first draft in that plays are read aloud by classmates and a feedback session follows that focuses on what works and what needs to be improved.

Students then write a second draft and maybe even a third. Dubin also invites established playwrights as guest speakers to share their experiences of pursuing an interest in playwriting after graduating from college.

Dubin frequently uses his theater contacts to find opportunities to perform his students’ plays. She also created opportunities here in Oakland.

For several years, she partnered with Professor Tom Suda, who taught directing, to present a showcase where student directors each staged a play written by the students.

Dubin resumed this partnership with Professor David Gram and his directing students this year to present an evening of student-written plays that showcased the talents of student actors, playwrights and directors.

Dubin continues to mentor his students long after graduation, introducing them to the local theater network, encouraging them to submit their work to various playwriting competitions, and continuing to help them refine their work. It is a measure of his success that nearly 130 of his students’ plays have received awards, readings, or full productions at theaters in Michigan and beyond.

Although there are too many students to name who have been successful in their work, Dubin said there are a number of students who deserve major recognition:

• Anetria Cole and Franco Vitella both won MaTilDa awards in playwriting. The Complete Cole Game, Bronzeville Gold, has received numerous readings and full productions and has been selected for inclusion in the National Black Theater Festival. Cole and Vitella also performed plays at the American College Theater Festival.

Vitella and Kassandra Dunaj had their complete plays produced by the School of Music, Drama and Dance. Vitella was also selected to participate in the Kennedy Center Playwright Initiative.

Matt Bell became an accomplished, nationally known fiction writer who now teaches creative writing at Arizona State University. His one-act plays have been performed in Heartlande Theater’s Play by Play and have been included in two of OU’s staging showcases.

Martin McArthur’s play, The moment he hears ithad a staged reading at OU in 2016, directed by David Gram, and a staged reading afterwards at Theater Nova in Ann Arbor.

Lauren Knox Mounsey teaches acting and is artist-in-residence at the Purple Rose Theater Company. She also had one of her own plays produced at the Purple Rose.

Jacquelyn Priskorn Floyd was a student in the first playwriting class at OU in 1997 and returned to take the advanced class in 2014. During that time she had 14 readings, received 4 awards, and had 62 productions of his short plays.

Recent students whose plays have been performed for the public include: Emily Nichter, Alessia Fionda, Xochi Rios-Ellis, Kaye Hoffmeyer and Lucas Jeffrey.

“A lot of times people talk about a project they created and grew as their baby,” Dubin said. “Certainly, this term applies to me. I love watching my students grow and develop their talent, and I’m thrilled to be able to help them transition from the classroom into professional theater.

“Each year I teach my classes a little differently because I’ve changed, the students have changed, and the world has changed,” she added. “The plays we study, as well as the plays students write, must reflect these changes. My goals are always to keep my classes fresh and current, and to maintain a high degree of student engagement.

Over the past 25 years, Dubin said his enthusiasm for teaching playwriting has never wavered.

“I’m as excited to teach a class now as I was on the very first day,” she said. “I can’t imagine a job that would be more personally fulfilling and I’m grateful to Oakland for giving me that first opportunity and supporting me every step of the way.”

To learn more about playwriting classes at Oakland University, visit the School of Music, Theater and dance and creative writing websites.

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Five artistic things to do for Women’s History Month: Celebrating the achievements and creativity of Austin’s female artists – Arts https://acotonline.org/five-artistic-things-to-do-for-womens-history-month-celebrating-the-achievements-and-creativity-of-austins-female-artists-arts/ Fri, 04 Mar 2022 07:24:54 +0000 https://acotonline.org/five-artistic-things-to-do-for-womens-history-month-celebrating-the-achievements-and-creativity-of-austins-female-artists-arts/ by Valerie Fowler earth change at Cloud Tree Studios Women’s History Month enters our lists with a bright array of creative presentations, glorifying gallery walls, echoing across theater floors, filling art spaces with a decidedly feminine presence. Mind you, it’s not that different from months on the cultural scene in this city, but we’re glad […]]]>

by Valerie Fowler earth change at Cloud Tree Studios

Women’s History Month enters our lists with a bright array of creative presentations, glorifying gallery walls, echoing across theater floors, filling art spaces with a decidedly feminine presence. Mind you, it’s not that different from months on the cultural scene in this city, but we’re glad to have the excuse to shout out these five opportunities to enrich your life in a feminine way.

Cloudy Tree: Earth Change

Valerie Fowler’s latest Texas landscape paintings – including one of the largest she has ever done – are sinuously intricate, psychedelic polychrome, and grounded as much in the local soil and flora as they are in the vast color palette that the artist uses to hypnotize. Have you ever seen the world look like this, Austinite? You will never forget it once you do. Until March 13. 3411 E. Fifth. Mon-Fri, noon-6pm; Sat-Sun, noon-5pm. cloudtreestudiosandgallery.com

Lydia Street Gallery: Elemental Spirit

Austin-based artists Jacqueline May and Jana Swec seek to connect with something deeper, May using pure and simple symbols, math and language, while Swec uses landscapes as symbols themselves. May plays with materials: oil, encaustic, collage, and more recently mosaic; Swec uses acrylic like the master painter she is, creating vistas of provocative significance. Opening: Sat. March 5, 6-9 p.m. 1200 East. 11th #109. lydiastreetgallery.com

Bottle Alley Theater: Peckin the Crown

This show is what happens when you combine witchcraft, puppets, psychedelic drugs and breathe images from the dark fairy tale into it. Little Red Riding Hood. The tale, written by Chris Fontanes and performed by Bottle Alley Theater Company at the Vortex, revolves around one of the last remaining members of a witch coven and her descent into multiple realities, guided by a manipulative demon. Until March 12. Thu.-Sat., 8 p.m.; Sun, 6 p.m. 2307 Manor Road, 512/478-5282. $15-35. vortexrep.org

grayDUCK Gallery: Results

Reminiscent of geological formations and resembling objects in a cabinet of natural curiosities, Bethany Johnson’s sculptures offer a multi-layered meditation on deep time, material metamorphosis and the human-made landscaping of landfills, quarries and trenches. of road. Until March 6. Sat-Sun, 12pm-6pm. 2213 E. Cesar Chavez, 512/826-5334. grayduckgallery.com

Deborah Hay Dear dancer among women and their work

Deborah Hay: screening and conversation

Women & Their Work presents iconic choreographer Deborah Hay in conversation with archivist and dancer Laurent Pichaud, with a preview Dear dancer, their current film. Pichaud will ask Hay to respond to images he pulled from the archives – which Hay may not have seen in decades – exploring Hay’s perspective as an artist and woman living and working in Austin since 1976. . Saturday March 5, 11 a.m. 1311 E. Caesar Chavez, 512/477-1064. Free. womenandtheirwork.org

A version of this article appeared in print on March 4, 2022 with the title: five things

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A 20th Anniversary Reimagining – KC STUDIO https://acotonline.org/a-20th-anniversary-reimagining-kc-studio/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/a-20th-anniversary-reimagining-kc-studio/ Performers in the Ruby Room at the Music Theater Heritage, left to right: Ron Lackey, Courtney Germany, Misha Roberts, Nate McClendon, Ayana Tribitt, Kadesh Flow, Douglass Walker and Darrell Mayberry. (photo by Jim Barcus) The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm. With a revised name and expanded focus, […]]]>

Performers in the Ruby Room at the Music Theater Heritage, left to right: Ron Lackey, Courtney Germany, Misha Roberts, Nate McClendon, Ayana Tribitt, Kadesh Flow, Douglass Walker and Darrell Mayberry. (photo by Jim Barcus)


The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm.

With a revised name and expanded focus, the Kansas City theater celebrates its 20th anniversary with a full slate of productions and a new Ruby Room performance space

A good story worth repeating: the company now known as Music Theater Heritage began 20 years ago with a live radio broadcast from a Belger Cartage loading dock in downtown city ​​of Kansas City.

Conceived as a way to promote founder George Harter’s longtime radio show, “A Night on the Town,” the nonprofit theater company grew and established itself as a place to enjoy music from classic Broadway shows. For several years the shows were staged as concerts which included theatrical elements, but were not quite full productions. MTH has withstood the COVID-19 pandemic through perseverance and innovation and has now prepared a season to mark two decades of existence.

“You know, this year is unlike any other for a number of reasons,” said Tim Scott, the company’s executive art director. “First of all, it’s our 20th anniversary. But, of course, you’re also trying to plan for the unexpected because of the coronavirus. »

Like any proud art director, Scott is not above indulging in justified bragging. In a press release late last year, he highlighted the company’s success in battling the pandemic. Let the record show: MTH was the first professional theater to produce a live show in 2021 with its rooftop production of ‘Music of the Night’. Since April last year, MTH has produced 14 live productions and served nearly 500 students through educational initiatives; in 2021, nearly 40,000 spectators saw performances at the Crown Center; and the company started the year with three employees but now has nearly 30.

In addition to presenting a few shows on the roof of the Crown Center, the company has also turned to concerts made for video and made available to the public virtually. Scott, who shot and edited the performances, delivered high-quality reviews that wouldn’t have looked out of place on public television.

In all, the company made 14 live productions in 2021.

“We did ‘Hair’ and ‘Camelot’ through the Delta variation,” Scott said. “With ‘Hair’, half the singers wore masks.”

The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm.

Tim Scott, Executive Artistic Director, Music Theater Heritage (photo by Sophia Napoli)

The season:

“STEVIE: signed, sealed, delivered” is scheduled from March 24 to April 10. The production celebrates the music of Stevie Wonder and will be staged in collaboration with 2 Proud 2 Beg, bandleader Ron Lackey’s Motown ensemble.

“Song and Dance” Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rarely produced two-act musical will run May 12-29. Half of the show is told in song, the other half in dance. The arrangements involve a rock band and a cellist. Webber wrote the dance portion of the show for his brother, cellist Julian Webber. It will be a regional first.

“Titanic,” June 16-July 3. The Broadway production of this show, with words and music by Maury Yeston and an accompanying book on the musical by Peter Stone, was a massive physical production with a huge cast and full orchestra. The MTH version of necessity takes a different route with a twist: the music will be performed by a small ensemble on instruments played by musicians on the doomed Titanic – a string quartet and a grand piano.

“Cabaret,” August 11-28. Kander and Ebb’s classic about decadent Berlin and the rise of Nazism before World War II will be staged with cabaret tables and stools arranged closer to the stage than the usual audience seats. “Those seated in this area will have a slightly more immersive experience than those seated in the theater seats,” Scott said.

“Man of La Mancha”, October 6-23. This 1965 musical by composer Mitch Leigh, playwright Dale Wasserman and lyricist Joe Darion is adapted from the classic 17th-century novel “Don Quixote.” Scott said the show will be produced in conjunction with the Kansas City-based Ensemble Ibérica, which performs music from Spain and Portugal. The idea, Scott said, was to adapt the score in a way that gave it a bit more of an authentic Spanish feel.

“A Spectacular Christmas Spectacular”, an original revue and annual tradition at MTH, December 8-23.

“Titanic” and “Cabaret” will be performed at the Grand Theater (formerly the American Heartland Theater). Other productions will be in the traditional MTH space on the third floor of the Crown Center.

Additionally, MTH will be offering what they bill as the Ruby Room Series in a revamped performance space just off the main lobby. The shows focus on artists who made significant contributions to American culture, including Sonny & Cher and other 1960s pop singers: jazz artists Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington and Louis Prima; Nina Simone, Sam Cook and Otis Redding; the Beatles; beat generation writers Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac as well as bebop and cool jazz artists; and songwriters Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen.

Although a casual observer might not notice it, the name of the theater company is in its third incarnation. What started life as Musical Theater Heritage became simply MTH. From now on, “musical” has been replaced by simply “music” – Music Theater Heritage. It’s a small change but it involves a broader definition of music.

From radio roots to live performance

George Harter said he formed Musical Theater Heritage primarily to fund his radio show, which originally aired for several years on KXTR and later on Kansas Public Radio. The show eventually aired on a number of stations across the country. He said he and tenor Nathan Granner had approached backers to underwrite the show.

“I formed MTH just to fund the radio show,” Harter said. “When I shopped around for funding, local funders weren’t particularly interested in funding something out of town. So Nathan and I decided we needed a local mission and started a (live) series.

At Belger, the band performed a series of shows – “Carousel” (which marked Tim Scott’s first appearance on an MTH show), “On the Town”, “Brigadoon”, “Guys and Dolls” and “The Fantasticks “, including the others. Eventually, Belger needed the loading dock space to prepare his Belger Arts Center, so Harter began looking for other locations.

Before long, MTH was performing live shows in what was then called the Off Center Theater (a former movie multiplex) on the third floor of the Crown Center. Eventually, Harter said, MTH became the most frequent user of the space, leading Crown Center to offer them a contract as a full-time tenant.

“They gave us a great offer on the rent,” Harter said. Many concert productions have been directed by Sarah Crawford, and some of them have been particularly memorable – an effective all-female direction of “1776” and an engaged performance of “Big River”, the show based on “The Adventures of Huckleberry” by Mark Twain. Finnish.”

Chad Gerlt joined the team early on. He had returned from Los Angeles, where he had moved with the idea of ​​becoming a voice-over artist. “I wanted to do cartoons and video games,” he said. But he got by as a singing waiter at a Macaroni Grill in
Thousand Oaks.

“I missed my family and wanted to buy a house,” Gerlt said. “I could never have bought a house in LA”

Gerlt retired from MTH a few months ago to pursue a career in real estate. But he was proud to be part of the team that grew viewership and made MTH a success. From time to time, Gerlt performed on stage.

“COVID has obviously changed a lot of things,” Gerlt said. “It didn’t kill us, and I promise you it won’t kill us. But it changed the dynamic there.

The radio show was retired in 2015. The rise of online streaming services – Spotify etc. al – made all the music Harter had released over the years instantly available. A few stations across the country continued to air reruns of the show.

These days, Harter directs his energies to the theatrical trips he organizes for fans and bands to travel to New York and see Broadway shows.

But the theater’s original mission, he said, was a direct result of the radio show.

“It was about appreciating American musical theatre,” he said. “People realized that rock-and-roll and jazz were uniquely American art forms, but no one thought of the American songbook and musical theater as an original American art form.”

For more information on the Music Theater Heritage season, visit www.mthkc.org.

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FUSE Festival Returns in March to Celebrate Community Creativity https://acotonline.org/fuse-festival-returns-in-march-to-celebrate-community-creativity/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 23:59:20 +0000 https://acotonline.org/fuse-festival-returns-in-march-to-celebrate-community-creativity/ FUSE Festival returns to the streets, parks, venues, theaters, galleries and public spaces of Darebin next month for its FUSE Fall 2022 edition. Darebin City’s FUSE Festival takes place every autumn and spring, and FUSE Autumn 2022 will run from March 11-27, transforming Darebin into Melbourne’s arts and culture hub in a festival led by […]]]>

FUSE Festival returns to the streets, parks, venues, theaters, galleries and public spaces of Darebin next month for its FUSE Fall 2022 edition.

Darebin City’s FUSE Festival takes place every autumn and spring, and FUSE Autumn 2022 will run from March 11-27, transforming Darebin into Melbourne’s arts and culture hub in a festival led by local creatives.

The artist-led festivities will begin with renowned Australian host, podcaster and author Yumi Stynes, who will present Molly Hadfield’s oration on social justice to celebrate International Women’s Day.

Stay up to date with what’s happening in and around Melbourne here.

The oration will be part of FUSE’s opening night on March 11 at the Darebin Arts Centre, which will be hosted by MC Queen Acknowledgments AKA Nartarsha Bamblett, Proud Woman Yorta Yorta, Gunai Kurnai, Walpiri and Wiradjuri. The opening night will feature surprise guests and DJs from the local community, in a celebration of healing and connection within the community.

Finally, after a wide variety of performances, the free FUSE Out of the Park Picnic wrap-up party will take place on March 27 at Edwardes Lake Park. Boasting top local musicians and talent including Kylie Auldist and a wide variety of dance and drum ensembles. Co-presented with MAV and curated by local artist and storyteller Neda Rahmani, it will also be a celebration of 100 years of recreation at Edwardes Lake Park.

FUSE Program Highlights

Art

Throughout the duration of the festival, the exhibition Made in Rezza will showcase 15 artworks in 15 Reservoir showcases by 15 local artists, with a particular artistic focus on Reservoir.

Music

Hi REZ will provide the beats between March 18-27, with 20-40 young and emerging musicians, rappers, spoken word artists and singers taking the stage in pop-up performances around Reservoir Station on Edwardes Street and Broadway.

On March 20 at the Northcote Social Club, artist Yorta Yorta Dja Dja Wurrung Neil Morris presents We are a song, we dream, we are a countrya captivating mix of musical performances, stories and conversations featuring a powerful line-up of First Nations singers.

I liked it, but… I didn’t know what it was about will be a quiz show and musical show hosted on March 15 and 16 at the Northcote Social Club by renowned dancer and performer Joel Bray.

Theater

All you can do – a stage show by experimental theater company Pony Cam – has enlisted some of the most extravagant baby boomers in the community for a show about time, grief, sex and regret which will take place at Northcote Chalice on the 11 and March 13.

An uncertain timeby Dr Sarah Austin and Co, is a sensory theater performance for babies and their carers, taking place March 23-27 at Northcote Town Hall.

FUSE Fall 2022 will take place March 11-27. For more information, visit the site here.

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Perth Concert Hall announces 2022 season https://acotonline.org/perth-concert-hall-announces-2022-season/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/perth-concert-hall-announces-2022-season/ The Perth Concert Hall and the Perth Theater have launched a full program of performances and community activities for the first six months of 2022. Nick Williams, Managing Director of Horsecross Arts, the creative and charitable organization behind the Perth Concert Hall and the Perth Theatre, said: “With the final restrictions lifted from Monday 24th […]]]>

The Perth Concert Hall and the Perth Theater have launched a full program of performances and community activities for the first six months of 2022. Nick Williams, Managing Director of Horsecross Arts, the creative and charitable organization behind the Perth Concert Hall and the Perth Theatre, said:

“With the final restrictions lifted from Monday 24th January, we are absolutely delighted to be back to business as usual with the launch of our first print program since Spring 2020. It is perhaps a cliché to say that There’s something for everyone in the 60 pages, but it’s true! We have stunning classical concerts and world-class opera, some of the best family theater and thought-provoking drama, great artists from the entire rock, pop and folk spectrum, TV dance favorites and a who’s who of To top it all off, everyone in the area has the opportunity to take turns getting noticed by taking part in Oh When The Saints, our community show celebrating the city’s beloved soccer club!

We love nothing more than seeing audiences enjoy live performances and in-person encounters at our venues. Perth Concert Hall and Perth Theater continue to go above and beyond to ensure audience safety and comfort with improved building air circulation, crowd circulation systems and backstage distancing , as well as the implementation of mandatory wearing of face coverings and the regular provision of hand sanitizing stations. We are confident that the continuation of these mitigations, coupled with the tantalizing range of entertainment on offer, will see the people of Perth and beyond return once again to share in the joy of live performance with our amazing artists and friendly staff. and welcoming.”

The season opens at the Perth Concert Hall on Tuesday 25 January with a lunchtime concert by renowned international pianist Llŷr Williams, quickly followed on Friday 28 January by the magical musical performance The Lost Words: Spell Songs with Karine Polwart, Julie Fowlis, Kris Drever and many more top Scottish musicians. Perth Theater hosts Black Is The Color of My Voice February 3-4; the moving story of a jazz singer at the forefront of the civil rights movement inspired by the life of Nina Simone. The Original Theater Company‘s Hound of the Baskervilles is giving Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous adventure a brilliantly grotesque revamp from Tuesday 15th to Saturday 19th February.

Another theater highlight to look forward to as the season unfolds is Roald Dahl’s The Wonderful Story of Henry Sugar premiering on the UK stage from Thursday 26th March to Saturday 2nd April at a Perth theater , Helen Milne Productions and Roald Dahl Story. Corporate co-production. There are more opportunities for youngsters to enjoy the thrill of live theater with the musical and puppet adventure The Smartest Giant in Town on Saturday 12 and Sunday 13 March, the powerful teen drama I Am Tiger from Thursday 5 to Sunday May 7 and David Walliams’ the exciting and irreverent Gangsta Granny from Thursday June 23 to Sunday June 26.

Football fans and budding actors across the region can help shape and potentially star in Perth Theatre’s Oh When the Saints, a brand new show about Perth’s beloved football club and the community that supports it. The show takes place in the summer, but fans can get involved through a series of free creative fan groups kicking off with Pump it up! [The Music] Thursday February 3 and until Thursday March 31.

Perth Piano Sundays return to the Perth Concert Hall from Sunday 13 February with a multi-faceted program from concert hall regular Paul Lewis. Scottish Opera brings two short and gripping Russian operas to the hall on Friday 18 March. The Perth Theater presents The Paradis Files on Thursday 28 and Friday 29 April, a new chamber opera with music by Errollyn Wallen CBE about an extraordinary blind musician.

Highlights of the Perth Concert Hall’s contemporary music program include the rooftop piping of the Red Hot Chilli Pipers on Saturday February 5, a Perth debut for the Stornoway trio Peat & Diesel on Friday March 11, former frontman by Spandau Tony Hadley on Tuesday 22 March and Eddi Reader: 40 Years Live on Friday 1 April. Major tributes include Johnny Cash Roadshow on Friday March 22, Seven Drunken Nights – The Story of The Dubliners on Friday May 6 and The Ultimate Eagles on Friday June 24. Intimate folk, jazz and traditional concerts at the Perth Theater’s Joan Knight Studio include Scottish folk band Breabach on Friday 25th March, a celebration of Horse’s Same Sky album on Saturday 9th April and an evening of jazz with Fergus McCreadie Trio and Helena Kay’s KIM Trio + NCW on Saturday, April 23.

Perth Concert Hall’s comedy lineup sees a night of grunts and jokes with Josh Widdicome – Bit Much on Sunday 27th February, an observational comedy masterclass from Ed Byrne in If I’m Honest on Wednesday 9th March, antics Julian Clary’s camp on Thursday, April 7 and TV favorite Alan Carr’s Regional Trinket on Thursday, June 9. There’s a rare opportunity to be part of the comedy-making process as Daniel Sloss tries out some new material in Daniel Sloss presents at the Perth Theater on Friday 1st and Sunday 3rd April.

There are dance performances from Strictly favorites Aljaz and Janette at Perth Concert Hall on Friday 25th March and Oti Mabuse on Thursday 5th May. The Night Sky Show at Perth Concert Hall on Saturday 16th April is an entertaining introduction to stargazing for the whole family.

Popular workshops and community groups Horsecross Voices, Perth Youth Theatre, Glee and Little Stars return for regular sessions and there is a full season of films to enjoy from the Perth Film Society.

Most shows and activities are already on sale via the Horsecross Arts website by clicking here.

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Yakima Music and Theaters Begin Planning for Post-Pandemic Reopening | Explore Yakima https://acotonline.org/yakima-music-and-theaters-begin-planning-for-post-pandemic-reopening-explore-yakima/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/yakima-music-and-theaters-begin-planning-for-post-pandemic-reopening-explore-yakima/ Yakima performance venues, which have spent the past 13 months in survival and survival mode, are working on reopening plans to welcome audiences back. The plans, of course, are full of caveats — whether touring artists and businesses are up and running, whether state capacity restrictions are eased enough to let in crowds, whether there’s […]]]>

Yakima performance venues, which have spent the past 13 months in survival and survival mode, are working on reopening plans to welcome audiences back.

The plans, of course, are full of caveats — whether touring artists and businesses are up and running, whether state capacity restrictions are eased enough to let in crowds, whether there’s enough time to take care of all the logistics – but they represent a significant change since the end of last year. Back then, before the availability of the COVID vaccine reached the masses, you couldn’t convince Capitol Theater CEO Charlie Robin to talk about reopening in anything other than hypothetical terms. Deadlines were not part of the discussion. Now, he says the theater, Yakima’s century-old grande dame of the arts and entertainment world, could host performances again as early as November.

“This is where we plant our flag,” he said.

The Seasons Performance Hall, which has kept the Yakima live music flame flickering with live streams throughout the past year and very limited in-person seating for the past two months, is also beginning work for a more complete reopening. Executive Director Pat Strosahl began developing plans to approach other sites in the region to gauge their interest in collaborative programming. That is, he tries to organize a system whereby artists could set up tour routes with multiple venues at once, saving them the trouble of doing it piecemeal.

And the Warehouse Theater Company, Yakima’s long-established community theater troupe, is scrambling to figure out how it could hold shows on its lawn this summer to get back on track before capacity restrictions allow crowds to enter. new in the intimate theatrical space.

“We’re chomping at the bit, trying to figure out what we can do to get back,” said Warehouse executive director Vance Jennings. “We are continually reviewing the guidelines and trying to get into them as soon as possible.”

In addition to the optimism stemming from rising vaccination rates, the outlook for these site operators has been bolstered by a potential injection of federal funds. The $16 billion grant for operators of gated venues, whose applications were due to open last week but were delayed by technical issues, promises the kind of help arts, entertainment and cultural venues need to reopen seriously. With potential grants of 45% of an organization’s gross revenue in 2019 (capped at $10 million), the SVOG program is built for reopening.

“If we do open in November, we need to have the revenue to cover all the ramp-up expenses,” Robin said.

For the Capitol, that means rehiring laid-off staff or hiring new employees. The site generally operates with the equivalent of approximately 20 full-time employees. But the reduced crew working for the organization has only five people left. Plus, there’s the matter of bringing together all the show-specific part-time workers and volunteers; it takes 120 to 150 people to make a traveling Broadway-style production in Yakima.

To do that without the revenue streams it usually has would put the Capitol in a precarious position, Robin said. Its budget is more stable than most venues due to its partnership with the city and collection of revenue from sales tax, lodging tax, and cable tax. But lodging tax revenue fell off a cliff last year, as did facility rentals, which normally account for about 40% of the Capitol’s budget.

A $500,000 SVOG prize, which Robin says is what the venue would qualify for, would go a long way.

“It’s because of the prospect of the closed site operator grant that we’re really seeing how we’re going back up,” he said.

The Seasons has a similar outlook, Strosahl said. Like the Capitol, The Seasons relies on facility rentals for much of its budget. And while it may have remained partially open, first as a livestream location and more recently for limited-capacity in-person seating, it does not make a profit on those shows. An infusion of federal money would be “the support we need to get to the other side,” he said.

Stosahl doesn’t expect live music — which relies on comprehensive, multi-city touring itineraries to make it interesting for artists — to return to 2019 levels for at least a year. But an SVOG grant would allow The Seasons to bridge the gap by continuing its live-streaming model with remote VIP seating. Live streaming adds $1,800 to $2,000 in venue costs per show, he said.

“So the amount of money from this grant could bail us out for 40 or 50 gigs,” Strosahl said.

The Warehouse Theatre, which operates on an all-volunteer model, does not have the staffing costs of other venues. But it still has the maintenance expenses of a large facility, which for over a year has not come cheap. As has been the case with the Capitol and The Seasons, the Warehouse has received vital donations and aid money during the pandemic. But without the cash flow from ticket sales, it could really use up the grant money for gate operators.

“It would allow us to pay for the things necessary for us to reopen,” Jennings said.

And, of course, the new round of federal funding won’t solve all of the venues’ problems. Going dark (for almost two years by the time it’s all over) takes a bite out of a place’s budget. And that $16 billion is going to go fast. But during a Zoom roundtable with site operators last week, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., indicated she understands that. She will continue to work to help them recover, she said.

“I was very happy to hear Senator Cantwell acknowledge that,” said Robin, who was one of the site operators on the Zoom call. “It is understood that there is high demand.”

There is also a broad understanding among site operators that their work means more than money to their community. In Yakima, the Capitol is a symbol of history and resilience as well as a place to see a wide range of diverse programming. The Seasons is the place to see important musicians from genres as disparate as Latin rock and cool jazz. And the Warehouse is a showcase for the theatrical talents of the community itself.

The arts are “how we become human,” Strosahl said, citing prehistoric cave paintings as evidence of how artistic expression is intrinsic to our identity.

“It’s not an economic activity, it’s not a livelihood, it’s not hunting and gathering,” he said. “It’s trying to mirror the human experience and communicate that to other people, and that’s deeply needed.”

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Skylight Music Theater: Ernest Shackleton Loves Me regional premiere postponed for a week due to groundbreaking covid-19 cases https://acotonline.org/skylight-music-theater-ernest-shackleton-loves-me-regional-premiere-postponed-for-a-week-due-to-groundbreaking-covid-19-cases/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 13:17:01 +0000 https://acotonline.org/skylight-music-theater-ernest-shackleton-loves-me-regional-premiere-postponed-for-a-week-due-to-groundbreaking-covid-19-cases/ Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (January 7, 2022) – The Skylight Music Theater has announced a week-long postponement of the regional premiere of Ernest Shackleton loves me due to positive cases of COVID-19 among the fully vaccinated society. The musical will now run from Friday January 21 to Sunday February 6, 2022. The show was previously scheduled for […]]]>

Milwaukee, Wisconsin. (January 7, 2022) – The Skylight Music Theater has announced a week-long postponement of the regional premiere of Ernest Shackleton loves me due to positive cases of COVID-19 among the fully vaccinated society. The musical will now run from Friday January 21 to Sunday February 6, 2022. The show was previously scheduled for performances from January 14 to 30.

Customers with tickets for canceled performances from January 14 to 20 will receive an email with information on how to exchange or refund the tickets.

Ernest Shackleton loves me is a highly inventive off-Broadway musical that travels across continents and time in an unlikely and enchanting love story and won the Best New Musical at the 2017 Off-Broadway Alliance Awards. This romantic and epic adventure connects a struggling modern-day bachelor / violinist; and Ernest Shackleton, an intrepid Antarctic explorer playing the banjo of the early 1900s. Digital projections of actual images from Shackleton’s expeditions are incorporated into the multimedia set design.

Ernest Shackleton loves me is written by Joe DiPietro, (winner of the Tony Award for Memphis), with lyrics by Val Vigoda and music by Brendan Milburn. Jill Anna Ponasik will lead. The musical director is Eric Svejcar. Matt Daniels as Ernest Shackleton and Janice Martin as Kat will make their Skylight debuts.

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION

Ernest Shackleton loves me takes place January 21 – February 6, 2022 at the beautiful Cabot Theater at the Broadway Theater Center, 158 N. Broadway, in Milwaukee’s Historic Third District. Skylight is Milwaukee’s professional Equity musical theater company. Safety requirements are in effect, including indoor masks and proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test.

To purchase tickets or to exchange / refund tickets for canceled performances, contact the Broadway Theater Center box office. Call (414) 291-7800, visit 158 ​​N. Broadway, Monday to Saturday, noon to 6 p.m. or send an email [email protected].

· Please advise the ticket office if accessible seating is required or if customers will have a wheelchair or walker.

· The opening hours of the ticket office are Mondays. – Sat. 12 p.m. to 6 p.m. The ticket office is also open two hours before performances.

Group discounts are available for groups of 10 or more, please contact the box office (414) 291-7800 or [email protected].

For ADA purposes, please contact the box office (414) 291-7800 or [email protected].

Skylight offers a risk-free guarantee to exchange, credit or refund tickets for any canceled performances.

SPECIAL EVENTS

Preview of the skylight. In-depth discussions with directors and special guests take place an hour before Wednesday and Sunday performances.

ASL performance. Ernest Shackleton loves me will be performed in American Sign Language on Thursday, January 27 at 7:30 p.m. To purchase tickets for this show, send an email [email protected] or call the Skylight Music Theater box office at (414) 291-7800. Mention the ASL performance for the seats in the appropriate section. ASL performance support provided by UPAF Connect.

For more information visit www.skylightmusictheater.org, send email [email protected] or call him

Ticket office at (414) 291-7800.

LUMINOUS BAR AND BISTROT

The Skylight Bar & Bistro is open two hours before show time and offers a pre-theater menu from Sabrosa. Conveniently located on the second floor of the Broadway Theater Center, reservations are available online here or at https://sabrosa.cafe or call 773-485-9975.

CAR PARK

Purchase $ 5 parking vouchers at the Broadway Theater Center box office to use in the Historic Third Ward parking garage at 212 N. Milwaukee Street (one block east and one block north). Vouchers are valid between 5:00 p.m. and 11:59 p.m. for evening performances. Matinee vouchers are valid from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays. Not valid for Wednesday mornings. The sale of vouchers ends 30 minutes before the time of the show. Advance purchase recommended so that vouchers can be mailed with tickets. No refund.

A parking meter is available in the street (free after 6 p.m. and on Sundays).

HEALTH AND SAFETY PROTOCOLS

Skylight Music Theater has joined with other performing arts organizations in Milwaukee in demanding proof of vaccination or a negative Covid test within 72 hours of performance for all members of the public aged 12 and over. Additionally, Skylight requires the public to be masked indoors at all times, regardless of immunization status. For up-to-date information, please visit www.skylightmusictheater.org/health.

ABOUT SKYLIGHT MUSIC THEATER

The Skylight Music Theater is proud to be a founding member of the United Performing Arts Fund.

Founded in 1959, Skylight is the professional musical theater company Equity of Milwaukee and the state’s largest employer of Wisconsin actors. Skylight produces the full spectrum of musical theater, from hit Broadway musicals to reimagined operas, and from thrilling world premieres to contemporary Broadway hits. Skylight’s main home is the Cabot Theater in the Broadway Theater Center, which was built by Skylight in Milwaukee’s Third Historic District in 1992. Considered one of Milwaukee’s finest theaters, the Cabot Theater is based on the design of an 18eFrench opera house of the century. With only 350 seats, it offers the public a breathtaking view of the action on stage. Skylight Music Theater marks its 62nd season in 2021-2022.

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BroadwayWorld Austin Awards winners announced https://acotonline.org/broadwayworld-austin-awards-winners-announced/ Wed, 05 Jan 2022 22:28:16 +0000 https://acotonline.org/broadwayworld-austin-awards-winners-announced/ [ad_1] The winners have been announced for the 2021 BroadwayWorld Austin Awards. The 2021 Regional Awards honor productions that had their first performance between October 1, 2020 and September 30, 2021. Streaming productions were eligible this year in categories designated as such. This year, BroadwayWorld also allowed audiences to vote for the theaters they are […]]]>


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The winners have been announced for the 2021 BroadwayWorld Austin Awards. The 2021 Regional Awards honor productions that had their first performance between October 1, 2020 and September 30, 2021.

Streaming productions were eligible this year in categories designated as such. This year, BroadwayWorld also allowed audiences to vote for the theaters they are most eager to return to and the productions they are most eager to see.

The BroadwayWorld Regional Awards are the biggest theater audience awards, attended by more than 100 cities from around the world.

Want to be the first to know about the 2022 BroadwayWorld Regional Awards? Sign up for our local newsletter here.

2021 BroadwayWorld Austin Awards Winners

Best Choreography in a Play or Musical
Anna Joy Jones – GOD – Gaslight Baker – 2021

Best Costume Design for a Play or Musical
Tammy Francois – GOD – Gaslight Baker – 2021

Best Direction in a Musical
A. Jason Jones – GOD – Gaslight-Baker Theater – 2021

Best direction of a part
Trish Ridgon – DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Best direction of a flow
Trish Rigdon – DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Better Editing of a Stream
Kevin Smith – SPOON RIVER PROJECT – City Theater Company – 2021

Best lighting design for a play or musical
Kevin Rigdon – DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Best Musical
GOD – Gaslight Baker – 2021

Best Performer in a Musical
David Kelly – GOD – Gaslight Baker Theater – 2021

Best Performer in a Play
Strange hallie – TWELFTH NIGHT – Central Texas Theater Academy – 2021

Best Performer in a Streaming Musical
Karin Cunningham – idiot – Wimberley Players – 2021

Best Performer in a Streaming Game
Marie Rath – DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Best game
LOST IN YONKERS – Georgetown Palace Theater – 2021

Best production of the year (in person)
DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Best Stage Design for a Play or Musical
Tammy Francois – GOD – Gaslight Baker Theater – 2021

Best Sound Design for a Play or Musical
Dylan Barnes – THE WAR OF THE WORLDS: THE PANIC BROADCAST – Wimberley – 2021

Best Streaming Concert / Cabaret
PALACE PLAYS ON – Georgetown Palace Theater – 2021

Best Streaming Musical
idiot – Wimberley Players – 2021

Best streaming playback
THE WAR OF THE WORLDS: THE PANIC BROADCAST – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Best Supporting Performer in a Musical
Rebecca Smootz – GOD – Gaslight Baker Theater – 2021

Best Supporting Actor in a Play
Jack Garret – TWELFTH NIGHT – Central Texas Theater Academy – 2021

Best Supporting Performer in a Streaming Musical
Melissa May Moncus – idiot – Wimberley Players – 2021

Best Supporting Performer in a Streaming Game
Mary Jane Windle – DRACULA: THE RADIO GAME – The Wimberley Players – 2021

Most anticipated upcoming production of a musical
HADESTOWN – National Tour – 2021

Most anticipated upcoming production of a play
MURDER OF AGATHA CHRISTIE ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS – Gas lamp – 2021

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Parkersburg rewards Barbara Full | News, Sports, Jobs https://acotonline.org/parkersburg-rewards-barbara-full-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 20 Dec 2021 05:02:29 +0000 https://acotonline.org/parkersburg-rewards-barbara-full-news-sports-jobs/ [ad_1] Parkersburg Mayor Tom Joyce, left, discusses the accomplishments of Barbara Full, right, during the production of ‘Elf! The Musical ”on December 11, which he declared Barbara Full Day in the city. (Photo provided) Parkersburg Actor Guild President David Rexroad, right, presents Barbara Full with a bouquet on December 11 at the Guild stage. Parkersburg […]]]>


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Parkersburg Actor Guild President David Rexroad, right, presents Barbara Full with a bouquet on December 11 at the Guild stage. Parkersburg Mayor Tom Joyce, left, declared the day Barbara Full Day and acknowledged Full during the final performance of “Elf!” The Musical ”, for which Full was musical director and Rexroad as director. (Photo provided)

PARKERSBURG – A longtime music teacher and supporter of the arts was recognized at the final performance of the Parkersburg Actors Guild production of “Elf! The musical.

Mayor Tom Joyce took the stage on Saturday December 11 to proclaim Barbara Full Day in the town of Parkersburg.

“Elf” was the fourth Guild production for which Full has served as Music Director since joining the theater company in 1975. She has also performed in over 40 shows and conducted 15.

Full was a music teacher at Neale Elementary School for 36 years, conducting the school choir and producing musical pieces, complete with costumes and sets. She has directed numerous Junior Broadway productions – including “Annie,” “Violin on the roof,” and “Joseph and the incredible Technicolor dream coat” – and worked to ensure that every student in the school could participate.

“I had a wonderfully supportive and creative group of parents who loved helping me create a bit of Broadway at Neale Elementary,” says full. “I loved continuing to work with the kids of the Smoot Theater and the Actors Guild, working with the kids of alumni, meeting new kids and parents, and experiencing magical musical moments over and over again.”

Parkersburg Mayor Tom Joyce, left, discusses the accomplishments of Barbara Full, right, during the production of ‘Elf! The Musical ”on December 11, which he declared Barbara Full Day in the city. (Photo provided)

One of those students who took part in Full’s productions was Joyce himself.

“Ms. Full made me play ‘Fat Elvis’ in fourth grade, and I also played Knute Rockne in a production,” he said. “I once played ‘The Great Pretender’ for one of his shows with my grade school buddies.

“I have been a fan of Ms. Full for a very long time” Joyce said. “She touched a lot of lives and was a champion of the arts here and abroad.”

In 1996, Full and two colleagues founded the Wood County Elementary Honor Choir which continues today. After her retirement in 2010, she formed the Smoot Theater Children’s Chorus, which expanded to include a Boys Ensemble and a Girls Ensemble.

Full served in multiple capacities as a member of the Trinity Episcopal Church for over 40 years. She creates the monthly newsletter of the church and serves in the sacristy.

“On behalf of the Trinity of Barbara Episcopal Church family, we could not be more excited to hear the proclamation from Mayor Joyce,” said Reverend Paul L. Hicks, Rector of Trinity Episcopal. “We know the hard work and dedication she brings to her ministries here at the church and we have no doubts about the positive impact she is having on the community as a whole.”

During the summers of 2017 and 2019, she traveled to England with a Washington, DC area choir, formed and conducted by her sister. The group was the choir in residence at two cathedrals each of those summers.

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Music Theater Works announces the 2022 season of great musicals and buys that special someone a Broadway song written and recorded just for them! | Radio WGN 720 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-announces-the-2022-season-of-great-musicals-and-buys-that-special-someone-a-broadway-song-written-and-recorded-just-for-them-radio-wgn-720/ Thu, 16 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-announces-the-2022-season-of-great-musicals-and-buys-that-special-someone-a-broadway-song-written-and-recorded-just-for-them-radio-wgn-720/ This week, Paul goes behind the curtain with the staff of Music Theater Works. Production Art Director Kyle Dougan and Director of Marketing and Public Relations Aaron Ozee preview a fantastic and exciting 42nd season. The theater company once known as Light Opera Works is now home to the North Shore Center for the Performing […]]]>

This week, Paul goes behind the curtain with the staff of Music Theater Works. Production Art Director Kyle Dougan and Director of Marketing and Public Relations Aaron Ozee preview a fantastic and exciting 42nd season. The theater company once known as Light Opera Works is now home to the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts at 9501 Skokie Boulevard in Skokie. With Billy Elliott closing out the current season, discover the unique productions of La Cage aux Folles, Disney’s The Little Mermaid (an immersive production) and much more online for the new season. Subscriptions and tickets can be purchased at www.musictheaterworks.com or by calling: 847-673-6300.

Next, Paul chats with Broadway star (Book of Mormon and Hello Dolly, among others) Nic Rouleau about his new venture: Broadway Song Shoppe. Born out of the struggles of the pandemic, the store brings together many Broadway stars who personalize a written Broadway-style song and perform it for that special someone in your life. Holidays, birthdays, anniversaries or just to say “I love you” or “I’m thinking of you”, the stars incorporate specific information you provide into the lyrics and the result is a personal song that is sure to bring a to smile. to the recipient. More information and ordering a song can be found at www.broadwaysongshoppe.com along with Broadway star biographies and sample songs. Nic surprises Paul during the show with a song he wrote just for Paul, so listen to him for fun because that’s what he can do for you. And orders placed soon will be able to take advantage of a 10% discount using the discount code: BEHIND THE CURTAIN. Talk about a unique and special gift…you’ll want to check out this fun gift idea!

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