live music – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 09:17:03 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png live music – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 Welcome to SXSW 2022 Conference & Festivals – Event Guide https://acotonline.org/welcome-to-sxsw-2022-conference-festivals-event-guide/ Sat, 19 Mar 2022 09:17:03 +0000 https://acotonline.org/welcome-to-sxsw-2022-conference-festivals-event-guide/ Hi, all of you! We have a suite of participant resources to help you on your SX journey from March 11-20. At the heart of SXSW, this year’s epic gathering of creatives from the worlds of tech, film, music and beyond is in full swing in Austin and online. SXSW is a whirlwind of inspirational […]]]>

Hi, all of you! We have a suite of participant resources to help you on your SX journey from March 11-20.

At the heart of SXSW, this year’s epic gathering of creatives from the worlds of tech, film, music and beyond is in full swing in Austin and online. SXSW is a whirlwind of inspirational sessions, film screenings, get-togethers, early morning tacos, music showcases, exhibits, competitions, late night tacos, plenty of networking opportunities and more.

“It has been three years since we hosted an in-person SXSW, and we couldn’t be more excited and honored to bring together a lineup that spans the depth, breadth and quality of creativity and leadership that make SXSW the global destination. for creative professionals. – Hugh Forrest, Programming Director

Pick up your badge at check-in located in the Austin Convention Center, Exhibit Hall 1. Before you go, review COVID-19 guidelines, vaccination, testing, and other badge requirements here.

There are there is still time to join us! Visit the SXSW Trolley or buy locally. Can’t participate in the IRL? the SXSW Online Pass grants you full URL access to our robust digital event component.

Explore our quick attendee guide below, including event access, navigation, and ways to log into SXSW. For a full list of event tools and tips for the adventure ahead, visit the Member Services Center.

Overview of the program

SXSW conference programming includes Main presentations and Featured Speakers sessions. Plus, hundreds of sessions spotlighting industry leaders across our 15 tracks, 9 summits and various formats.

With a variety of new, developing and established Present artists, the Music Festival brings together artists and industry professionals from around the world. Listen to live music throughout the city all week.

Rolling out the Film Festival red carpet, explore the set 2022 film lineup across all screening categories and download the movie schedule for a quick timestamp guide to what’s on.

Explore the SXSW Schedule for all announced programming, including Comedy Festival showcases, exhibitions, awards, creative industries exposure, trade shows and parties, networking and beyond.

SXSW Schedule

Watch SXSW online

SXSW 2022 is both in-person and online, simultaneously, for the first time. SXSW online takes place in web, mobile, TV apps, XR environments and mentoring platforms. Content includes 24/7 streaming across three channels, as well as on-demand conference and festival programming.

SXSW Online is open to all SXSW online badges and passes. Learn more about where to watch as well as RSVP mentoring session and movie requirements here.

SXSW online

Select events will be streamed live to the public on SXSW’s official social media channels, including keynote addresses and presentations from featured speakers. Check free live stream program.

Navigating IRL Events

Explore all the ways to experience SXSW 2022 on the go from your device or at home, including the official SXSW GO mobile app, SXSW TV, SXSW Expo and connected TV apps. To download Official mobile and TV apps to start.

Event Status allows you to easily check the current status of a room or the remaining capacity of a place. A Green-yellow-red system appears on the SXSW GO app, the SXSW Scheduleand on digital event status boards located around the Austin Convention Center and other locations.

Take note of special hall bag requirements. Paramount and Stateside theaters have a clear bag policy to minimize the contact that a bag search would require. Clear bags must not exceed 14″x12″x6″ (35x30x15cm). Tote bags from SXSW registrants – received when collecting registration badges – are permitted. Learn more about screening access at person and online from the film festival on the attendee services hub.

Browse our transportation services to easily navigate downtown Austin to your next session, meeting, filming or presenting. the SXSW Shuttle is a free shuttle that runs between the Austin Convention Center and most SXSW festival sites. Browse the shuttle map, schedules and other transportation options on the Getting Around page.

Getting Around Austin

Wear comfortable shoes

Experienced registrants know that SXSW is a marathon, not a sprint. Plan to walk a lot, be weather ready, stay hydrated and expect the unexpected discoveries that make SXSW unique! (Tip: read more tips here. #tips)

Member Services Center

To follow

Stay in the SX know! Follow us for daily event updates and exclusive coverage March 11-20 on Twitter, instagram, Facebook, LinkedInand ICT Tac.

Have a great SXSW 2022, y’all!

Teaser Image: 2022 SXSW Showcasing Artist, Perfume Genius – Photo by Renee Dominguez

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Music, theater and possibly a regatta planned for this weekend https://acotonline.org/music-theater-and-possibly-a-regatta-planned-for-this-weekend/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-and-possibly-a-regatta-planned-for-this-weekend/ On this last weekend of February, a variety of theater performances and live music – as well as a sailing regatta if the weather permits – await you on the northern Olympic peninsula. Here is a sample of things to do, see and hear. • “Baskertown”, A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, opens tonight for a three-week […]]]>

On this last weekend of February, a variety of theater performances and live music – as well as a sailing regatta if the weather permits – await you on the northern Olympic peninsula.

Here is a sample of things to do, see and hear.

• “Baskertown”, A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, opens tonight for a three-week run at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic “The Hound of the Baskervilles” is translated on stage, with Holmes (Tim Thorn) and Doctor Watson (Peter Stone) investigating a legendary curse on the Baskerville family.

The other 40 or so roles are all played by a handful of actors, all of whom change costumes and characters in public view. Meanwhile, multiple projections provide clues and atmospheric effects.

Performances are at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Tuesdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays until March 13. Tickets — $15 general, $8 student — are available at www.pacommunityplayers.org and at the theater the day of the show. All clients must show proof of full vaccination.

A “Too Hot for Socks” dance is taking place tonight in the Castle Ballroom at 651 Cleveland St., Port Townsend.

Doors open at 6 p.m., swing dance instructor Ben White gives a class from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; then the dancing continues until 9 p.m.

A ticket is required to reserve the dance class; multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Doyle provides the music. Masks and proof of vaccination required. To reserve tickets, visit www.thecastleinpt.com/events.

• The Big Tango by Astor Piazzolla is the centerpiece of two free performances by the Port Townsend Symphony Orchestra.

Along with cellist Pamela Roberts, the ensemble will take the stage at the Chimacum School Auditorium, 91 West Valley Road, Chimacum, first for the dress rehearsal at 7 p.m. tonight, then for the concert at 2 p.m. on Sunday .

It’s first come, first seated tonight, but reservations are strongly advised for Sunday’s event via [email protected] Spectators aged 12 and over must present proof of vaccination at the door and everyone must wear an effective mask inside the auditorium.

More information can be found at PTsymphony.org.

Sean Rankins’ boat Cito, in the foreground, competed in the 2021 Shipwrights Regatta in Port Townsend Bay. This year’s event is scheduled for Saturday noon. (Port Townsend Sailing Association)

• The 31st Annual Shipwrights Regatta is set for noon Saturday on Port Townsend Bay.

The Port Townsend Sailing Association is hosting the event, with details for boaters on PTsail.org and via [email protected] .

Spectators are welcome to watch the race from the Port Townsend waterfront – unless it’s cleared, organizer Jim Heumann said.

“If the current weather forecast holds, it is likely that we will postpone the race. There are high winds and heavy rain expected,” he said on Thursday, adding that the decision will be made this afternoon.

Live music at Finnriver Farm & Cidery124 Center Road, Chimacum, includes three concerts this weekend.

Jazz singer Sarah Shea sings Gershwin, Ella Fitzgerald and other Great American Songbook classics tonight from 5-7 p.m.; then Jonathan Doyle, Matt Weiner and Eric Eagle play jazz and swing from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, and finally Chris Miller and Matt Sircely prepare Americana from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

An entrance fee to each of these performances supports the musicians. For details, see https://www.finnriver.com/farm-music-event-calendar.

• Auditions for the showcase of new works at Olympic Theater Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim, will be held from 1-4 p.m. Saturday and 6-9 p.m. Monday.

The showcase, a collection of eight short plays by local playwrights, has roles for actors of all ages and experience levels.

Rehearsal times will be decided by the cast and crew of each play; performances will take place from March 25 to April 3. For more information, visit olympic theatrearts.org or call 360-683-7326.

• “The blues is a woman”, a theatrical concert celebrating the female history of blues music, comes to the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center, 304 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, Saturday night.

Information and tickets are available on the Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts website, JFFA.org.

• The last weekend of “Angel Street (Gaslight)”, The Victorian thriller now on the Olympic Theater Arts stage, has three performances: 7.30pm tonight and Saturday and 2pm Sunday.

This tale, which has been made into a movie twice, is directed by Sequim’s Ginny Holladay.

For tickets, which are $18 general and $12 for students, visit olympic theatrearts.org. Clients must show proof of vaccination.

________

Jefferson County Senior Reporter Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3509 or [email protected]



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Summit Artspace’s March 11 ArtWalk will feature art, live music and theatrical performances https://acotonline.org/summit-artspaces-march-11-artwalk-will-feature-art-live-music-and-theatrical-performances/ Thu, 24 Feb 2022 18:19:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/summit-artspaces-march-11-artwalk-will-feature-art-live-music-and-theatrical-performances/ AKRON, Ohio – Summit Artspace will host Akron Artwalk, a quarterly celebration of learning through the arts, on March 11 from 4-8 p.m. The free event will take place at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., and other venues in Akron’s historic arts district. Featuring the theme “Art Connects Us!”, Summit Artspace’s resident artists and […]]]>

AKRON, Ohio – Summit Artspace will host Akron Artwalk, a quarterly celebration of learning through the arts, on March 11 from 4-8 p.m.

The free event will take place at Summit Artspace, 140 E. Market St., and other venues in Akron’s historic arts district. Featuring the theme “Art Connects Us!”, Summit Artspace’s resident artists and vendors will offer artwork and handmade items for sale and the gallery will be open to visitors.

ArtWalk highlights at Summit Artspace include:

  • An open house with student performances and artwork by visual arts students at Miller South School for the Visual and Performing Arts (Akron Public Schools)
  • Artwork for Sale by Student Artists in the National Art Honor Society Chapter at Akron School of the Arts/Firestone CLC (Akron Public Schools)
  • Artistic activities conducted by students of the University of Akron Art Education Program at the Mary Schiller Myers School of Art
  • Hours of operation for Summit Choral Society’s new studio and classroom space
  • Pop-up theatrical performances by young people from the Genesis Experience Theater
  • Local Andrew Izold will perform live music in the Taylor Main Gallery to complement the “Fresh” exhibit. Local bands Strings Attached, Bout Time and Celtic Flux will also perform throughout the evening on the third floor.

ArtWalk highlights at other locations include:

  • The Akron Art Museum will be open until 8 p.m. and offers a paid workshop with local artist Megan Young inspired by the “More is More” exhibit from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
  • The Akron Summit County Public Library will host a free concert featuring the Joe Augustine Jazz Trio in the main library auditorium from 6:30-8 p.m.
  • The Nightlight Cinema will play “Lunana: A Yak in the Classroom” at 5:30 p.m. and “Writing with Fire” at 8 p.m.
  • In the Northside District, the Northside Cellar will be open until 5 p.m. and Zeber-Martell Gallery and Clay Studio will be open until 6 p.m.
  • From 8:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., Jilly’s Music Room will host the band Mo’ Mojo, who will play Zydeco music infused with American, Cajun, reggae, rock & roll, funk, R&B, African and Latin rhythms.
  • Musica will present a concert featuring Free Black!, JT’s Electrik Blackout and Jean P The MC. Doors open at 8 p.m. and the concert starts at 9 p.m.

Parking for ArtWalk will be available in the lot between Summit Street and Broadway Street, which is accessible from Mill Street (but not Market Street).

Want more information about Akron? Sign up for the Rubber City update from cleveland.coma newsletter sent by e-mail on Wednesdays at 5:30 am.

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Mitski, Dropkick Murphys, Drama, more https://acotonline.org/mitski-dropkick-murphys-drama-more/ Wed, 23 Feb 2022 16:00:23 +0000 https://acotonline.org/mitski-dropkick-murphys-drama-more/ Here are our top picks of live music options in the Austin area from February 24 through March 2. Check venue websites for COVID-19 protocols and any possible pandemic-related postponements or cancellations. Thursday Drama in Mohawk Describing themselves as “happy and sad music handmade in Chicago”, the duo layer the soulful vocals of the Austin […]]]>

Here are our top picks of live music options in the Austin area from February 24 through March 2. Check venue websites for COVID-19 protocols and any possible pandemic-related postponements or cancellations.

Thursday

Drama in Mohawk

Describing themselves as “happy and sad music handmade in Chicago”, the duo layer the soulful vocals of the Austin singer Via Rosa with the expressive dance beats of Na’el Shehade. Together they create easy chillwave vibes that will get your body moving while getting you into your feelings. $20. 7 p.m. mohawkaustin.com. – SSD

Dana Cooper at Cactus Cafe

Originally from Missouri, singer-songwriter Cooper made his solo debut on Elektra in 1973 before moving to Texas and teaming up with Shake Russell for several well-received duet records. A new solo album, “I Can Face the Truth”, was released last week. The Cactus, a historic venue in the University of Texas Student Union Building, had been closed for nearly two years when it quietly reopened recently, with open mics on Tuesdays and occasional performances by local and touring musicians. Free. 7:30 p.m. cactuscafe.org. – PB

Continued: The Foo Fighters lead a lineup of stacked “Austin City Limits” tapings this spring

Friday

‘A Fistful of Tango’ with Montopolis at Esquina Tango

Pianist Justin Sherburn and violinist Leigh Mahoney of Austin’s classical crossover ensemble Montopolis will perform traditional tango arrangements by fellow local musician Glover Gill to accompany “The Toll Gate,” a silent 1920 western, during this unusual event which will also include an introductory tango class. The original film was reinterpreted by comedian Carlos Larotta “in the irreverent style of the Alamo Drafthouse Master Pancake Theater production,” according to the event’s Facebook description. $20. 7 p.m. doors. esquinatango.org. – PB

Saturday

Mitski at ACL Live

In 2019, the 31-year-old singer and master of evocative pop composition spooked her fans by announcing that a performance at Summerstage in New York would be her “last show indefinitely.” To quell the ensuing panic among lovers of her intimate singing, she later took to Twitter to clarify that she was just taking a well-deserved break. Two and a half years later, she has a new album (the last under contract with her label), “Laurel Hell”, which reinforces her ability to weave powerful emotion through breathtaking soundscapes. She will be joined by the Japanese group Chai. 8 p.m. Technically complete. acl-live.com. – SSD

Continued: SXSW Announces Gunna, Young Thug, Shawn Mendes, Kygo For Outdoor Shows At Waterloo Park

Austin Symphony Orchestra presents “West Side Story” at the Long Center

Steven Spielberg’s recent Oscar-nominated remake has revived interest in the classic 20th-century musical theater production that was first adapted for the screen in 1961. The orchestra will show the original film and perform its score iconic live. $19 to $79. 8 p.m. thelongcenter.org. – PB

‘United Vol. 6: A Black History Month Boogie’ at Cheer Up Charlies

After postponing last year’s boogie due to the pandemic, Groove Temple is bringing back its annual Black History Month celebration. While keeping the dance floor hot, the party aims to educate Austin about the black and LGBTQ roots of house music. “We cannot express our excitement about reviving this celebration of darkness, house music culture, women, sisterhood and dance in Austin,” organizers said in a post on Facebook about the event. Houston-based DJ Ms. Melodic will join Chicago-born DJ Shani on the tables. Queen Deelah will be the host. $5. 9 p.m. facebook.com/thegroovetemple. – SSD

Mike Norton Instrument Drive with the Houston Jazz Collective at Antone’s

Norton, a renowned Houston-based booking agent who died in 2016, wanted the guitars he had collected over decades to be donated to young musicians in need. His friend Steve Haas helped make it possible, teaming up with Austin’s Cannonball Instruments and Anthropos Arts to add 20 horns to 20 amps and guitars that will be showcased for Austin-area youth that night. The Houston Jazz Collective, featuring Darrel Lavigne plus Gerry Gibbs & Thrasher People, will perform a Mardi Gras-inspired celebratory set. $20. 8 p.m. antonesnightclub.com. – PB

Continued: Health Alliance for Austin Musicians Gets ‘First Ever Permanent Residency’ in South Austin

Tuesday

Dropkick Murphys at Stubb

St. Patrick’s Day is still weeks away, but the Murphys will ring in March with their decidedly Celtic take on the punk music that has made them a favorite in their native Massachusetts and beyond for more than 25 years. The group released their 10th album, “Turn Up That Dial”, in 2021. $39.50-$45. 5:30 p.m. doors. stubbsaustin.com. – PB

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Yakima Music and Theaters Begin Planning for Post-Pandemic Reopening | Explore Yakima https://acotonline.org/yakima-music-and-theaters-begin-planning-for-post-pandemic-reopening-explore-yakima/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/yakima-music-and-theaters-begin-planning-for-post-pandemic-reopening-explore-yakima/ Yakima performance venues, which have spent the past 13 months in survival and survival mode, are working on reopening plans to welcome audiences back. The plans, of course, are full of caveats — whether touring artists and businesses are up and running, whether state capacity restrictions are eased enough to let in crowds, whether there’s […]]]>

Yakima performance venues, which have spent the past 13 months in survival and survival mode, are working on reopening plans to welcome audiences back.

The plans, of course, are full of caveats — whether touring artists and businesses are up and running, whether state capacity restrictions are eased enough to let in crowds, whether there’s enough time to take care of all the logistics – but they represent a significant change since the end of last year. Back then, before the availability of the COVID vaccine reached the masses, you couldn’t convince Capitol Theater CEO Charlie Robin to talk about reopening in anything other than hypothetical terms. Deadlines were not part of the discussion. Now, he says the theater, Yakima’s century-old grande dame of the arts and entertainment world, could host performances again as early as November.

“This is where we plant our flag,” he said.

The Seasons Performance Hall, which has kept the Yakima live music flame flickering with live streams throughout the past year and very limited in-person seating for the past two months, is also beginning work for a more complete reopening. Executive Director Pat Strosahl began developing plans to approach other sites in the region to gauge their interest in collaborative programming. That is, he tries to organize a system whereby artists could set up tour routes with multiple venues at once, saving them the trouble of doing it piecemeal.

And the Warehouse Theater Company, Yakima’s long-established community theater troupe, is scrambling to figure out how it could hold shows on its lawn this summer to get back on track before capacity restrictions allow crowds to enter. new in the intimate theatrical space.

“We’re chomping at the bit, trying to figure out what we can do to get back,” said Warehouse executive director Vance Jennings. “We are continually reviewing the guidelines and trying to get into them as soon as possible.”

In addition to the optimism stemming from rising vaccination rates, the outlook for these site operators has been bolstered by a potential injection of federal funds. The $16 billion grant for operators of gated venues, whose applications were due to open last week but were delayed by technical issues, promises the kind of help arts, entertainment and cultural venues need to reopen seriously. With potential grants of 45% of an organization’s gross revenue in 2019 (capped at $10 million), the SVOG program is built for reopening.

“If we do open in November, we need to have the revenue to cover all the ramp-up expenses,” Robin said.

For the Capitol, that means rehiring laid-off staff or hiring new employees. The site generally operates with the equivalent of approximately 20 full-time employees. But the reduced crew working for the organization has only five people left. Plus, there’s the matter of bringing together all the show-specific part-time workers and volunteers; it takes 120 to 150 people to make a traveling Broadway-style production in Yakima.

To do that without the revenue streams it usually has would put the Capitol in a precarious position, Robin said. Its budget is more stable than most venues due to its partnership with the city and collection of revenue from sales tax, lodging tax, and cable tax. But lodging tax revenue fell off a cliff last year, as did facility rentals, which normally account for about 40% of the Capitol’s budget.

A $500,000 SVOG prize, which Robin says is what the venue would qualify for, would go a long way.

“It’s because of the prospect of the closed site operator grant that we’re really seeing how we’re going back up,” he said.

The Seasons has a similar outlook, Strosahl said. Like the Capitol, The Seasons relies on facility rentals for much of its budget. And while it may have remained partially open, first as a livestream location and more recently for limited-capacity in-person seating, it does not make a profit on those shows. An infusion of federal money would be “the support we need to get to the other side,” he said.

Stosahl doesn’t expect live music — which relies on comprehensive, multi-city touring itineraries to make it interesting for artists — to return to 2019 levels for at least a year. But an SVOG grant would allow The Seasons to bridge the gap by continuing its live-streaming model with remote VIP seating. Live streaming adds $1,800 to $2,000 in venue costs per show, he said.

“So the amount of money from this grant could bail us out for 40 or 50 gigs,” Strosahl said.

The Warehouse Theatre, which operates on an all-volunteer model, does not have the staffing costs of other venues. But it still has the maintenance expenses of a large facility, which for over a year has not come cheap. As has been the case with the Capitol and The Seasons, the Warehouse has received vital donations and aid money during the pandemic. But without the cash flow from ticket sales, it could really use up the grant money for gate operators.

“It would allow us to pay for the things necessary for us to reopen,” Jennings said.

And, of course, the new round of federal funding won’t solve all of the venues’ problems. Going dark (for almost two years by the time it’s all over) takes a bite out of a place’s budget. And that $16 billion is going to go fast. But during a Zoom roundtable with site operators last week, U.S. Sen. Maria Cantwell, D-Wash., indicated she understands that. She will continue to work to help them recover, she said.

“I was very happy to hear Senator Cantwell acknowledge that,” said Robin, who was one of the site operators on the Zoom call. “It is understood that there is high demand.”

There is also a broad understanding among site operators that their work means more than money to their community. In Yakima, the Capitol is a symbol of history and resilience as well as a place to see a wide range of diverse programming. The Seasons is the place to see important musicians from genres as disparate as Latin rock and cool jazz. And the Warehouse is a showcase for the theatrical talents of the community itself.

The arts are “how we become human,” Strosahl said, citing prehistoric cave paintings as evidence of how artistic expression is intrinsic to our identity.

“It’s not an economic activity, it’s not a livelihood, it’s not hunting and gathering,” he said. “It’s trying to mirror the human experience and communicate that to other people, and that’s deeply needed.”

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City Winery Concert Hall and Restaurant to Open at City Foundry STL | Local company https://acotonline.org/city-winery-concert-hall-and-restaurant-to-open-at-city-foundry-stl-local-company/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:04:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/city-winery-concert-hall-and-restaurant-to-open-at-city-foundry-stl-local-company/ City Winery, a live music venue and restaurant concept with locations nationwide, will open in late 2022 at City Foundry STL. Courtesy of City Foundry STL ST. LOUIS — Downtown entertainment and office district City Foundry STL announced its new tenant, City Winery, an East Coast music venue and restaurant chain, on Thursday. City Winery […]]]>





City Winery, a live music venue and restaurant concept with locations nationwide, will open in late 2022 at City Foundry STL.


Courtesy of City Foundry STL


ST. LOUIS — Downtown entertainment and office district City Foundry STL announced its new tenant, City Winery, an East Coast music venue and restaurant chain, on Thursday.

City Winery will offer live entertainment, private event spaces, a fully functional winery and other events when it opens later this year. It will be located on the west side of the Foundry, next to the Food Hall, and will accommodate 175 people for concerts and 70 for the restaurant, according to a statement.

“St. Louis has always been one of my favorite cities in the country,” City Winery founder and CEO Michael Dorf said in a statement. “It’s where I went to college, and it’s an honor to open in the historic City Foundry STL building.”

Chez Ali Proves City Foundry's Long-Awaited Food Hall Is Worth The Wait

Dorf, who also founded New York’s historic Knitting Factory concert hall, attended the University of Washington, according to his LinkedIn profile.

City Winery was launched in 2008 and has offices in New York, Boston, Washington, DC, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Nashville and Chicago.

“We are thrilled to have another national brand join our community,” said Will Smith, general manager of City Foundry STL, in a statement.

City Foundry STL is a more than $300 million redevelopment of the former Federal-Mogul site. The Alamo Drafthouse cinema, a Puttshack mini-golf concept and other retail businesses are set to join the Fresh Thyme grocery store, which opened in November. The office component of City Foundry opened in 2020.

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Faster Than Sound: A Year’s Headlines in Limbo: A Flurry of Industry Activity in an Intermittent Reopening Scene – Music https://acotonline.org/faster-than-sound-a-years-headlines-in-limbo-a-flurry-of-industry-activity-in-an-intermittent-reopening-scene-music/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:46:01 +0000 https://acotonline.org/faster-than-sound-a-years-headlines-in-limbo-a-flurry-of-industry-activity-in-an-intermittent-reopening-scene-music/ [ad_1] Gary Clark Jr. at the Moody Amphitheater in Waterloo Park in August (Photo by David Brendan Hall) Austin’s music has spent much of the year in limbo, and here we are again – holding our breath as a handful of sets and events cancel each other out because of Omicron. Rather than being defined […]]]>


[ad_1]

Gary Clark Jr. at the Moody Amphitheater in Waterloo Park in August (Photo by David Brendan Hall)

Austin’s music has spent much of the year in limbo, and here we are again – holding our breath as a handful of sets and events cancel each other out because of Omicron. Rather than being defined by an album or show, the local music headlines of 2021 crawl to the beat of national events.

When COVID raged, concerts were canceled, a tedious continuum, over and over again. When an unprecedented frost hit Texas in February, musicians and production workers distributed essential supplies. In April, as vaccines became available, an advocacy group Austin Texas Musicians musicians dosed at Pershing while Austin Musicians’ Health Alliance vaccinated limbs inside Emo’s.

Just in time for the fall of a largely maskless live touring economy to return, many big clubs have struck a ceasefire with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission under sliding protocol: concerts require recent negative COVID-19 tests in all areas and accept proof of vaccination as an alternative, always mentioning the cards in second position in the infographic.

The year of limbo conformed to a quote provided by ACL Live at the Moody Theater General manager Colleen Fischer in March, speaking of rescheduled tours: “It’s a moving target, unfortunately. We do our best to navigate it. We continue to move shows. We continue to book shows. “

Former Music Lab location in Saint-Elme (Photo by John Anderson)

Lost musical spaces

Lost music venues of the year include the BARN on Brodie Lane, the Parish, Dry Creek Café and Boat Dock, and Hazelnut amphitheater (whose owners plan to open a new Round Rock concept). Otherwise, 2021 also closed Groover’s Paradise Record Store, the hi-fi paradise Sound gallery, and Music labthe final location of St. Elmo. An indicator of Elon muskthe growing presence of in Austin, this latest beloved music incubator has become a You’re here showroom and service center.

Asked about the viability of operating a rehearsal space, the secretary of the Music Lab Joe cabela said to the Chronicle: “I think it would be difficult within the city limits. The cost of construction and the market rents make it difficult.”

The parish abruptly closed in October after the owner Matt reppert changed the locks and barricaded the windows without warning, according to a lawsuit filed by the owners of the premises. Seeking more than a million dollars in damages, the lawsuit alleged that the owner “had instigated a plot to requisition the business”. By the lake, Dry Creek Cafe threw one last Halloween party after its longtime owner Jay “Buddy” Reynolds sold the 68-year-old dive bar, despite fan rallying.

Inside the Concourse project in September (Photo by John Anderson)

An influx of openings

With the re-emergence of live music, an influx of new venues has made debuts delayed by the pandemic. The cavernous Competition project started booking big names in dance and electronics near the airport in June. Public green space during the day and a room for 5,000 people at night, Waterloo Park‘s Moody Amphitheater started hosting major tours in August, working with promoters C3 presents.

In other opening updates, Long-term salon established a second location at 1910 E. Cesar Chavez, formerly Stay Gold. Captain Quackenbush’s Cafe opened a 100-seat venue in the former South Austin site house Strange drink. Dance club with murals Outer Heaven nightclub occupies 1808 E. 12th, which once housed dozen street and Club 1808.

Right next to Burnet, North Austin stop Love wheel discs open in April under the ownership of Mike Nicolai, known as the longtime sound engineer at Hole in the wall. The breweries also provided top-notch outdoor stages, including increased bookings to Central machinery works and Meanwhile the brewing.

Astromonde impacts

ScorePlus, an Austin-based production and promotion company owned by Living country, has come under scrutiny following the Astromonde Festival tragedy in Houston. Considered one of the deadliest concerts in US history, the event left 10 people dead and dozens injured. A state task force headed by Texas Bureau of Music Director Anthony brendon – including safety experts, police and fire officials, state agencies like TABC, and unspecified leaders in the music industry – began meeting to produce a report on the safety of concerts.

The virtual convention avenue designed for SXSW Online

Who owns Austin Industry?

Following a virtual edition of the flagship festival in March, South by South-West announced a major new investor in April. Owners of Rolling stone, Billboard, Variety, and more, media umbrella P-MRC took a 50% stake in the Austin company. The partnership bolstered finances while the CEO of SXSW Roland swenson called “an incredibly difficult time for small businesses, including SXSW”.

Austin’s Keeled scales in partnership with the important Illinois footprint Polyvinyl in May, opening of a joint local office. By purchasing a 25% stake in the local brand, Polyvinyl takes care of direct fulfillment of consumer orders, while Keeled Scales retains creative control. And in June, members of the concert promotion team behind Margin Walker and Transmission events launched a new events company Resonate present below Graham williams‘ ownership.

The places have also changed hands: Ryman Hospitality Properties, owners of Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium and the Grand Olé Opry, renewed its plans to acquire the flagship Austin site ACL Live at the Moody Theater. Spider House Ballroom renamed just “The ballroom“under a new owner by Chris Boulanger, owner of from Arlo herbal restaurants.

The end of a 10-year management contract between KUT / KUTX and UT-Austin leads to the dismissal of Cafe Cactus director Matt Muñoz and executive assistant Amy Chamblesse. The venue has been reduced to anecdotes, open mics, and less than a dozen artists booked this fall semester, mostly curated by a group of students Events + Entertainment.

Funding of local and federal sites

After lobbying throughout 2020, local and federal site relief has been rolled out this year. The city of Austin created Preservation of live music venues The fund has allocated $ 5 million to local concert halls as part of COVID-19 relief efforts. As part of the emergency funding for Phase 1, 74 local sites received upfront payments of $ 20,000, quickly distributed by the city’s partner, the Long center. In phase 2 of the program, 28 clubs received larger ongoing grants.

Many Austin site owners hoped the local fund would complement larger support from the Subsidy for shutter room operators – also known as Save our steps. After many delays, the Small business management awarded more than $ 11.3 billion over the summer, awarding more than $ 130 million to 108 Austin-based live music and performing arts entities. According to data released in October, the top five amounts went to UT-Austin’s Texas Performing Arts, Messina Tourism Group, South by South-West, Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, and Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline.

Chencho Flores (Photo by John Anderson)

In memory

Twelve months have claimed many essential figures in Austin’s music. Alphabetically:

Nanci Griffith on the cover of The Chronicle of Austin in 2005

Austin Music Network Programmer Benjamin kent, former local spouse Chencho Flores, masterful blues guitarist Denny freemanesteemed folk and country songwriter Nanci griffithpoignant punk musician Brandon hamiltongenerous ABGB co-founder Mark Jensen, old Small Longhorn Lounge owner Ginny Kalmbach, renowned jazz drummer Scott Laningham, influential bassist Yoggie Musgrove, sound engineer who shapes the industry Rupert neve, promoter of powerful concerts /Backyard and Austin Music Room owner Tim o’connor, super harmonica Paul Oscher, psychedelic visionary /Janis Joplin group mate Powell St. John, boogie-woogie pianist Gene Taylor, pioneering music journalist Ed ward, and to top it all Broken spoke patriarch Jacques Blanc.

The last time I spoke with White, in July 2020, he reflected on the pandemic, “I don’t want this damn virus to kill live music, whether it’s country or rock or blues or whatever. It’s just a fucking shame … You can listen on TV or radio, but nothing beats being there with live music and letting the music take you where it takes you. can’t be the capital of live music if you don’t have music. It makes sense to me! “

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Things to do in Austin this weekend of December 10-12 https://acotonline.org/things-to-do-in-austin-this-weekend-of-december-10-12/ Fri, 10 Dec 2021 21:44:45 +0000 https://acotonline.org/things-to-do-in-austin-this-weekend-of-december-10-12/ [ad_1] AUSTIN, TX – With the sun shining this weekend for Austin, we can’t help but think of all the things you can do in the metro area. From vacation-themed festivals and events to exploring what is happening in downtown Austin, there is a plethora of things to do for families and young Austinites who […]]]>


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AUSTIN, TX – With the sun shining this weekend for Austin, we can’t help but think of all the things you can do in the metro area.

From vacation-themed festivals and events to exploring what is happening in downtown Austin, there is a plethora of things to do for families and young Austinites who want to explore all that the city has to offer. live music capital of the world has to offer.

Here’s a list of things you can do this weekend in Austin from December 10-12.

Watch “Elf” and “The Office: Christmas” at Globe Drive-In

Globe Drive-In locations will screen “Elf” at 5:30 pm Friday and “The Office: Christmas” at 6:00 pm Saturday. To purchase tickets, visit the Globe website.

“Elf” movie night at Alamo Drafthouse

Saturday 11 and Sunday 12 December

Alamo Drafthouse will host an “Elf” Movie Night on Saturday and Sunday at participating Alamo venues. Movie night will include props and a chance to enjoy the theater vacation-themed menu.

For tickets visit Alamo Drafthouse website.

Participating locations include: Village, Slaughter Lane, Lakeline and Mueller

3rd annual tour of the 12 Christmas bars

The 12 annual Bars of Christmas Crawl in Austin is back and will start from noon to 11 p.m. on Saturday, December 11.

Eight Austin bars on 6th Street will participate in this year’s crawl. Those who attend are invited to don their best holiday onesies, Santa Claus costumes, ugly sweaters, and elf costumes. Tickets range from $ 12 to $ 16. To buy yours, visit event site.

The 4th Annual Austin Christmas Pub Crawl by CrawlWithUs

This Christmas pub crawl at Parlor and Yard, 601 W. 6th Street, will kick off the holidays from 4 p.m. to midnight on Saturday, December 11. Profits from the event will be donated to Toys for Tots.
For more information, see their event here.

See “A Charlie Brown Christmas” at Paramount

The Austin Chamber Music Center will host “A Charlie Brown Christmas” at Paramount on Sunday December 12th. Hear the talented ensemble perform classic songs from the film, then head out to the lobby to take photos with Snoopy. Tickets start at $ 22.

Nightmare Before Christmas Gothic Bal & Bazaar at Elysium Austin

For adults looking for a good spooky holiday party, Elysium Austin will be hosting a Gothic Nightmare Before Christmas Ball & Bazaar from 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. on Saturday, December 11.

The venue will feature vocals, shadow casters, a special drink menu, DJs, and shopping for unique Texas items. Tickets cost $ 17. To buy tickets, go in line.

Explore a herbal holiday market

Need to find the perfect gift for the vegan in your life? Or maybe you just want to choose a more sustainable lifestyle?

Whoever you’re looking for, Wandering Vegan Holiday Market by Wanderlust Wine Collective is probably the best place to go to mark your wishlist.

Bringing together some of Austin’s best herbal sellers, you’ll find a plethora of food and pantry items, along with cruelty-free skin care products, candles, clothing, and more.

This free event will run from noon to 4 p.m. on Sunday, December 12, 702 Shady Lane.

The Jinkx & DeLa Holiday Show at the Paramount Theater

The hugely popular and globally acclaimed Jinkx and DeLa Holiday Show is back with its iconic comedy, brand new songs and a few eternal favorites.

The show is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Sunday, December 12 at the Paramount Theater in Austin. Tickets cost $ 25 and are available online.

A Christmas Drag Queen

“A Drag Queen Christmas: The Naughty Tour” is a magical (and hilarious) evening of holiday entertainment starring contestants from the reality TV show, hosted by Trinity The Tuck and Monet X Change.

Scheduled acts include Alyssa Edwards, Heidi N Closet, Kylie Sonique Love, Shea Couleé, Brooke Lynn Hytes and Crystal Methyd.

The ACL Live show takes place on December 13 at 8 p.m. at the Moody Theater in Austin. Tickets start at $ 72 and are available online.

Events taking place in the Austin subway throughout the month

Austin Trail of Lights

Stay warm in your car and navigate through illuminated displays of all shapes and sizes. Open every evening from November 27 to December 31 (except Christmas Eve and Christmas Day), with a few fun theme nights.

General admission vehicle passes are on sale for $ 30 to $ 40. To learn more about tickets, visit Austin Trail of Lights website.

Peppermint Walk

This driving holiday event was launched last year as a safe way to celebrate during the coronavirus pandemic. Music and millions of Christmas lights take center stage on the kilometer-long course.

The event will run until December 26. Tickets start at $ 35. For more information visit Peppermint Parkway website.

The Nutcracker Ballet by Ballet Austin

From lavish sets and costumes to the colorful characters you adore, Ballet Austin’s annual production of “The Nutcracker” is Austin’s favorite holiday tradition.

The show will take place at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. December 4-5, December 10-12, December 17-19, and December 21-23 at the Long Center, 701 W Riverside Drive, Austin. Tickets start at $ 35 and are available online.

A Christmas Carol at the Zach Theater

The beloved Christmas play will run through Sunday, January 2 at Topfer in ZACH at 202 South Lamar Street in Austin.

Tickets start at $ 25. Student rush tickets are $ 18 one hour before show time (with valid ID). A limited number of Pay-What-You-Will tickets are available on the day of for preview performances on Mainstage only.

Tickets are available online at zachtheatre.org, by phone at 512-476-0541 Monday to Friday from noon to 5 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Pinkmas at the Ice Cream Museum

The Ice Cream Museum will present “Pinkmas” starting November 18 and will run until January 9 at its estate location.

The magical immersive experience will include festive coffee drinks specials and a variety of celebratory activities. Tickets for the “Pinkmas” celebrations start at $ 44 and include vacation-themed frozen treats for guests to savor throughout the experience.

Add on the special “Pinkmas” package for $ 39 to stock up on limited-edition retail items like a headband, piñata plush, MOIC money pin, and sprinkle bag. Limit tickets are available online.

MORE HOLIDAY PLEASURES NOT TO BE MISSED:

Looking for more dining, shopping, or fun things to do on the Austin Metro? Check out our Austin locals guide.

This article originally appeared on the Austin patch

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THIS WEEK IN THE ARTS | Santa, live music, theater and more | Zoned https://acotonline.org/this-week-in-the-arts-santa-live-music-theater-and-more-zoned/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 19:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/this-week-in-the-arts-santa-live-music-theater-and-more-zoned/ [ad_1] Holiday Performing Arts Festival: Manhattan Area Music Teachers Association, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Also B&C Dance Company at 6 p.m. Downtown Manhattan, 100 Downtown Manhattan. Country Christmas and Christkindlemarkt, 10 am-4pm Bakery products, gifts, German cuisine and Santa Claus in one place. Lazy T Ranch, 2103 Zeandale Road. Holiday workshop, 1:30 p.m. to […]]]>


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Holiday Performing Arts Festival: Manhattan Area Music Teachers Association, 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

Also B&C Dance Company at 6 p.m.

Downtown Manhattan, 100 Downtown Manhattan.

Country Christmas and Christkindlemarkt, 10 am-4pm

Bakery products, gifts, German cuisine and Santa Claus in one place.

Lazy T Ranch, 2103 Zeandale Road.

Holiday workshop, 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m.

Create seasonal themed cards and decorations.

Tickets: $ 5 supply fee, $ 2.50 for Blue Star military families.

Saturday Craftermidi, 1:30 p.m.

Also DIY glass and wood engraving workshop at 2 p.m. Sunday, charcuterie and test workshop at 6 p.m. Thursday, Friday Workshop to choose your project at 6.30 p.m. Friday and Saturday evening Workshop to choose your project at 6 p.m. December 11.

Council and Brush, 311 Fort Riley Blvd.

Santa is coming to town from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Christmas tree lighting, vendors, shows and more. Father Christmas will be at the Library from 5.30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Island of Lights, 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Drive through the bright holiday displays.

Santa will be available for free photos from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.

Cost of donation: $ 10 per vehicle, cash only.

Milford State Park, 3612 State Park Road, Milford.

Open day and tram ride, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.

Christmas cookies, photos with Santa Claus and walks on the Festival of Lights.

Katie Way, 720 Poyntz Ave.

Walnuts / crushed nuts and other delicacies, 7:30 p.m.

The Nutcracker, but with a twist.

Mark A. Chapman Theater, Nichols Hall.

Live Theater: And then there was none, 7:30 p.m.

The Agatha Christie shows a dozen strangers with wicked pasts brought to the local scene.

Masks compulsory for unvaccinated spectators, and encouraged for vaccinated spectators.

Also at 2 p.m. on December 5 and 12 and at 7:30 p.m. on December 10 and 11.

Manhattan Center for the Arts, 1520 Poyntz Ave.

The Christmas Story of a Finn, 8 p.m.

Funtabi, Derek Calvin and the All Nighters and The Box Turtles will be performing.

Finn’s Neighborhood Pub, 317 Poyntz Ave.

Live music: Sally and the Hurts, 8 p.m.

Fraternal Order of Eagles 2468, 312 S. Fourth St.

Live music: Austin Meade, 8:30 p.m.

The Hat, 1315 Laramie St.

Local vendors will be set up in the indoor event center to facilitate the purchase of gifts. Free entry, but freebies, wine, and food will be available for purchase.

Liquid Art Winery, 1745 Wildcat Creek Road.

Recital: Little Apple Clarinet Quartet, 2 p.m.

Kirmser Hall, McCain Auditorium.

K-State Choirs Festival of Holiday Music, 3 p.m.

Songs performed by the K-State Concert Choir; Collegiate choir; Collegium Musicum; In-A-Accord; Advance and University Trebel Choirs: tenor-bass choir; and Ensemble Madrigal and Motet. Gospel singer Curtis Gulledge will be in attendance.

KC Bhangra will host dance workshops and wow the crowds. Light snacks and refreshments provided.

Grand Ballroom, K-State Student Union.

Holiday Destresser board game, 6-8 p.m.

Board games will be available for everyone, along with themed treats and crafts. Pajamas encouraged, shoes compulsory.

Fireside Lounge, K-State Student Union.

Blood drive, 9 am-4:30pm

Also 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Thursday at the K-State Student Union.

Holiday Inn Manhattan on campus, 1641 Anderson Ave.

K-State Women’s Basketball at Omaha, 5 p.m.

Watch, Listen, Live Stats: Mavs All-Access, K-State Sports Network, kstatesports.com.

A Canadian Brass Christmas, 7:30 p.m.

From renaissance to Dixieland via ragtime, the famous brass group returns to Manhattan.

K-State Men’s Basketball vs. Marquette, 8 p.m.

Christmas music SINGO, 7 p.m.

Teams of up to four can compete for prizes. No cost to play.

Manhattan Brewing Company, 406 Poyntz Ave.

First Infantry Division Holiday Concert, 7 p.m.

Free concert of holiday classics. First come, first served seats.

Also at 7 p.m. on December 11 and 2 p.m. on December 12.

CL Hoover Opera House, 135 W. Seventh St., Junction City.

It’s a wonderful life, 7:30 p.m.

The classic holiday movie brought to life on stage.

Also 7:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday. Additional shows at 7:30 p.m. on December 16, 17 and 18 and at 2 p.m. on December 19.

The Colombian Theater, 521 Lincoln Ave., Wamego.

K-State Track and Field v Carol Robinson Women and Attila Zsivoczky Men Winter Pentathlon, TBD.

K-State Fall 2021 begins, 1 p.m.

Graduation ceremony of the higher school.

K-State Women’s Basketball in South Dakota, TBD.

Watch, Listen, Live Stats: Midco Sports, K-State Sports Network, kstatesports.com.

Breakfast with Santa Claus, 8:15 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

Hot breakfasts, family photos with Santa, take-out decorations and more.

Two staggered sessions, from 8.15 a.m. and 9.15 a.m.

Flint Hills Discovery Center, 315 S. Third St.

K-State Fall 2021 Launch Schedule, 8:30 a.m.

Arts and Sciences, 8:30 a.m.

Business administration, 11:30 a.m.

Health and Human Sciences, 2:30 p.m.

Downtown farmer’s market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Third and Leavenworth Streets.

Santa at the Eagles holiday event, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Photos with Santa Claus with a donation to Toys for Manhattan.

Shop for Christmas gifts, cookie decorations, and a gift for a Kitchenaid blender.

Fraternal Order of Eagles 2468, 312 S. Fourth St.

Manhattan Festival of Lights.

Blue Earth Plaza, Third and Colorado streets.

Benefiting the Flint Hills Bread Basket.

Items needed include: instant mashed potatoes, canned pumpkin, canned sweet potatoes, canned stuffing, and evaporated milk.

Drop off point: Andrews and Associates Counseling, 1506 Browning Place, Ste. 107.

Manhattan Public Library online story times, all day.

Watch previously recorded story times for children.

Wrap It Up art exhibition and sale.

Tuesday-Friday: 12 p.m.-5.30 p.m.

Manhattan Center for the Arts, 1520 Poyntz Ave.

Exhibition: Discoveries of dinosaurs.

Flint Hills Discovery Center.

Exhibition: Two by two: Pairs of animals.

Unique associations of animals from the permanent collection, from Pueblo pottery to international artists.

Beach Art Museum, 701 Beach Lane.

Exhibition: Gordon Parks: Homeward to the Prairie I Come.

Beach Art Museum, 701 Beach Lane.

Exhibition: Doug Barrett: Find Your Voice.

Beach Art Museum, 701 Beach Lane.

Exhibition: Sunrise over Kansas: John Steuart Curry.

Beach Art Museum, 701 Beach Lane.

Room: Lisa Grossman: Outdoors.

SNW Gallery and Custom Frames, 406 ½ Poyntz Ave.

Exhibition: Exhibition gallery.

SNW gallery and personalized frames, 406 ½ Poyntz ave.

Country dance class, 7:30 p.m.

Grab boots and learn new moves. Everyone from beginners to experts is welcome.

RC McGraws Bar and Grill, 2317 Tuttle Creek Blvd.

Held in the Bluehills Room next to RC McGraws. First hand distributed at 7 p.m.

RC McGraws Bar and Grill, 2317 Tuttle Creek Blvd.

Car seat checks, 11 am-1pm

Call for more information: 587-4504.

Manhattan Fire Department, 2000 Denison Ave.

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Overloaded: Is There Just Too Much Culture? | TV & radio https://acotonline.org/overloaded-is-there-just-too-much-culture-tv-radio/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/overloaded-is-there-just-too-much-culture-tv-radio/ [ad_1] TThere was a time in 2012, oh, when I thought I would be able to keep up with all of this. And by “everything” I meant all the good TV shows, all the good movies, all the good music. From my little studio in Austin, Texas, I would read the Twitter feeds of reviewers […]]]>


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TThere was a time in 2012, oh, when I thought I would be able to keep up with all of this. And by “everything” I meant all the good TV shows, all the good movies, all the good music. From my little studio in Austin, Texas, I would read the Twitter feeds of reviewers I liked and then consume what they told me. I caught some obscure documentaries in one of the local theaters. I have BitTorrented shows that fell under the ever-expanding banner of “quality” television. Spotify meant that, for the first time, I could really listen to the top 100 albums of the year, as advised by Pitchfork. I saw blockbusters on Friday nights in movie theaters full of teenagers. I listened to Top 40 radio. I read the latest Pulitzer winners and the four Twilight books. I was enjoying myself, but not too full yet.

Or, to use a different metaphor: I walked on water in what I saw as a glorious and expanding sea of ​​media, such a contrast to the options of my rural youth, when my choices were severely limited by the options of the video rental store. , extended cable, and the only CD a month I could afford with childcare money. Of course, elements of my access were either illegal (BitTorrent) or very little paid to the artist (Spotify). But I also had the impression, just like when I was 27 years old, that I had finally reached a kind of comfortable ease, one that allowed me to always answer “Yes” when someone asked me. inevitably asked, “Have you seen / read / heard that?”

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Soon the definition and number of TV shows that seemed essential – or “quality” or part of a larger conversation – began to increase. It wasn’t enough to have watched The Wire and The Sopranos and be caught up with Mad Men and Breaking Bad. There were The Americans and The Good Wife, Outlander and The Knick, Game of Thrones and Homeland, Broadchurch and Happy Valley, as well as all the current seasons of shows that previously seemed very important (see: House of Cards) but which looked more and more like a chore.

Maintaining my fluency was getting harder and harder: I was a media studies teacher who could devote hours of my so-called workday to the task of consuming media. I was still far behind, and more every day. As I discuss my struggle to metabolize what seemed like an endless meal, I focus on television. But the television was only part of the bigger, overwhelming feast. Around the time that television options began to expand, the offer (and our access to) of so many other forms of culture, from YouTube to digital mixtapes, also expanded.

House of Cards looked like a chore. Was this the tipping point for this home entertainment? Photography: Netflix / Kobal / Shutterstock

In 2009, for example, 7 million people worldwide were using Spotify, with its seemingly endless music access; by 2014, that number had climbed to 60 million. Also in 2009, the teen YouTuber known as “Fred” became the first to see his channel reach a million subscribers. In 2014, a new YouTube channel was reaching this milestone every day. In 2012, 10 hours of music and audio were uploaded every minute to SoundCloud, going beyond traditional methods of production and distribution. In 2010, approximately 1,500 podcasts were released on iTunes each month. In 2015, it was almost 6,000. But something about the way television consumption standards have risen made it more overwhelming.

Maybe it had something to do with how difficult it was to have a shared conversation about a show: with my friends, who all seemed to be going down different paths; or with my students, who seemed to watch nothing at all; or even online, where the cherished art of episode recapping seemed less and less useful. Part of this could be blamed on Netflix, which in 2013 began its now common practice of releasing an entire season at once. Another factor has been the continuing and slowing decline of the media monoculture, first sparked with the broadcast of cable in the 1980s. Technology has made it possible to make more television and, thanks to demand, people. watch more. Index: 389 scripted TV shows aired in the US alone in 2014 – up from just 182 in 2002.

It was around this time that critics began to ask us if we had reached the “peak of television”. From the Guardian, in 2015: “Four hundred shows and no time to watch them: is there too much TV on television? From the New York Times: “Are there too many TV choices? And from NPR: “Is there really too much TV? A survey commissioned by Hub Entertainment Research found that 42% of viewers who watched five or more hours a week thought there was too much television in 2014.

But this survey also found something fascinating: 81% of viewers said the time they spent watching TV they spent watching shows they really liked. For anyone who grew up sharing a TV with their family and choosing between three and 15 great options, this is a real change. Instead of spending your Thursday night watching a rerun of a sitcom you never really liked just to have something before Friends started, you watch something you chose and, at least theoretically, keep watching. Choose.

There are, however, limits to the pleasures of choice. When Hub Entertainment Research asked the question again in 2017, only 73% said they spent their time watching shows they really liked – while the percentage of people who thought there was ” too much television ”fell from 42% to 49%. The survey did not ask respondents to delve deeper into their reasoning, but perhaps they felt something similar to what I was feeling at the time: like half of the things I was looking at, I was looking at a strange full trend; and the other half I was watching because I felt like I ‘should’, especially if I wanted to continue to be part of an imaginary online cultural conversation.

Law & Order: Special Victims Assistance Unit
The 500th episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit, our correspondent’s essential comfort watch. Photograph: NBC / NBCU / Getty Images Photo Bank

The result was a mixture of resentment and paralysis. I would watch two episodes of a show and get out on bail, just because I didn’t want to commit to the whole season. Going through the streaming menus was like babysitting hundreds of little kids, all clawing at me, desperate for my attention. Every time I saw a poster on the subway for another new show that I had never heard of, I wanted to graffiti it. How dare these networks produce so much, in so many forms, with so many seasons! How dare they produce so much content!

Of course, this feeling was totally irrational and totally wrong. “Peak TV” meant more TV shows, but it also meant more shows aimed at people who weren’t me, AKA people who weren’t straight, middle-class white women. The history of television is, in some ways, the history of executives who find out that people other than white people can spend. Black people spend money, for example, and would you believe gay people spend money too?

But the problem with Netflix is ​​that – unlike, say, a network – it wasn’t trying to attract a type of viewer that it could then sell to an advertiser, because there was no advertisers. Instead, Netflix was just trying to have enough content, meeting enough interests, to be able to convince as many people as possible that they should keep paying for its services every month. To make itself ever more valuable for ever more people, Netflix has started using its massive datasets, gleaned from the watch histories of millions of customers, to give struggling consumers a way to stay afloat. When you logged in, instead of feeling overwhelmed, you were meant to be comforted that the screen was showing you what was popular, and what other viewers like you were watching and what you were watching. He was supposed to feel organized but abundant; content but endless appealing.

Maybe that’s what you felt. It is certainly not what I felt. Back then, I was burning energy in my work, working in the ground trying to find the kind of stability I hadn’t really felt from that studio in Austin. Back then, I was ending my day of writing with a movie, or a few hours of the last show I had torrented, or even live music. It was like a bookend, like an exhale, like a real break. In 2017, all that media seemed like another item on my endless to-do list, as obligatory and joyless as doing dry cleaning.

So I did what I did when it comes to so many causes that fuel a larger sense of burnout: lowered the bar, then lowered it again. I stopped listening to most podcasts except the ones that I really, really like. When I watch TV it’s a mix of things that I actually enjoy and comfort me, regardless of how fresh or how cool (Law & Order: Special Victims Unit), shows that rekindle anticipation and glory of the day before the weekly meeting (Succession), and shows that I arrive a week, a month or a year late. I hate the Spotify algorithm, but I love music that comes to me the old-fashioned way: by people I know who tell me about it. I feel like getting away from a movie theater and will be back soon – but I have also stopped feeling guilty of a pandemic aversion to movies. This love and hunger will return. Feeling bad about it won’t make it happen any faster.

If someone were to do this poll to me today, asking me whether or not there is too much television, or even just too much media, I would say no. I’m glad there is so much to do to push other people’s buttons, to get them to watch and review, to make them feel seen and celebrated. Hope there are more weird, esoteric, and experimental stuff that challenges our understanding of what art can do, and I hope there are more shows like Ted Lasso that remind us of our constant thirst for tenderness. I hope, in other words, that there is more, even if it is not always more for me.

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