high school – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:05:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png high school – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 Music Theater Works’ ‘La Cage aux Folles’ revival meets actors’ long-held ambitions https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-la-cage-aux-folles-revival-meets-actors-long-held-ambitions/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:05:28 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-la-cage-aux-folles-revival-meets-actors-long-held-ambitions/ You could say that by performing in Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles”, Ginger Minj and Dane Strange are making up for missed opportunities. Minj, who plays Albin, an aging drag performer who stars in her husband’s nightclub revue, was slated to play the role years ago in a community theater production […]]]>

You could say that by performing in Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles”, Ginger Minj and Dane Strange are making up for missed opportunities.

Minj, who plays Albin, an aging drag performer who stars in her husband’s nightclub revue, was slated to play the role years ago in a community theater production in Florida. That production was canceled after city officials balked at doing a show about a gay family, said Minj, who was disappointed but admitted that at 18 the role wasn’t suitable.

It’s a perfect fit now.

“At 37, I truly understand history as being fiercely devoted to my family and fiercely devoted to the art of drag,” said the two-time ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ finalist.

During his senior year at college, Strange was set to play Jacob, George, and Albin’s butler, but things didn’t work out.


Dane Strange plays Jacob, the butler, in Music Theater Works’ “La Cage aux Folles”.

After 10 years, the Palatine resident – a veteran of Theater Nebula and Music on Stage – finally has the opportunity to play the part.

The Music Theater Works production marks the professional theater debut of the New Jersey native, who began his career at age 7 on the Disney Channel educational series “Out of the Box.” Commercials and TV spots followed. But the moment he began studying theater arts at Somerset County Vocational and Technical High School, Strange decided his place was on stage.

Like Strange, Minj has been performing since childhood. At six months, she played a “Fiddler on the Roof” baby. She grew up doing community theater.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

“I liked theater better, but I was more suited to musicals,” said Minj, a veteran of Chicago’s famed Baton Show Lounge, which has featured drag performers for more than 50 years.

“La Cage aux Folles”, which premiered in 1984 – the year Minj was born – was a big part of her life and holds a special place in her heart.



Jason Richards, left, plays Georges and Ginger Minj plays his partner, Albin, in the revival of Music Theater Works "La Cage aux Folles," through April 3 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts.

Jason Richards, left, plays Georges and Ginger Minj plays his partner, Albin, in Music Theater Works’ revival of ‘La Cage aux Folles’, through April 3 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts.
– Courtesy of Trevor Beaty

Regardless of the audience’s reaction, the tuner “sparks a conversation and gets things done,” she said, adding, “I’ve always thought that art and artists are the ones who really drive change. in the world”.

Despite her fondness for the Jerry Herman-Harvey Fierstein musical, Minj turned down repeated requests to play Albin because she felt theaters did not understand the role of pick-up in the show. But after talking to Music Theater Works artistic director and producer Kyle A. Dougan, she signed on.

“He (Dougan) said the story was about family,” said Minj, who then realized that “we’re coming to this from the same place.”

“I’ve never seen a successful production like this,” Minj said. “It tells the story in a new way while keeping everything you love about the original.”



The revival of Music Theater Works from "La Cage aux Folles" co stars "RuPaul's Drag Race" finalist Ginger Minj.

Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles” features “RuPaul’s Drag Race” runner-up Ginger Minj.
– Courtesy of Trevor Beaty

Additionally, the musical can be a way to introduce the LGBTQ+ community to people who may not know it, Minj said, showing them “that we’re as much a family as they are with our quirks, with our idiosyncrasies, with our drama and with our love… We are the same.”

For Strange, “La Cage aux Folles” is about acceptance: self-acceptance and acceptance of others. And while things have improved for members of the LGBTQ+ community, the battles remain.

“I had my own personal struggles as a black, gay man,” said Strange, who found Jacob’s role more difficult than he expected until he concluded that he had to accept himself.

“I am what I am,” said Strange, referring to the show’s iconic anthem. “We are what we are.”

• • •

“The Crazy Cage”

When: 8 p.m. Friday; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday; 1 p.m. Wednesday, until April 3

Where: Music Theater Works at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie, (847) 673-6300 or musictheaterworks.com

Tickets: $19.50 to $106

COVID-19 precautions: Proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 test and masks required

]]> Segerstrom Concert Hall to Present A BRONX TALE One-Man Show with Chazz Palminteri https://acotonline.org/segerstrom-concert-hall-to-present-a-bronx-tale-one-man-show-with-chazz-palminteri/ Thu, 03 Mar 2022 05:04:05 +0000 https://acotonline.org/segerstrom-concert-hall-to-present-a-bronx-tale-one-man-show-with-chazz-palminteri/ The Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents “A Bronx Tale” One Man Show with Chazz Palminteri on Saturday, April 2, 2022 at 8:00 p.m. at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall. In 1988, before it became a hit Broadway musical or feature film starring Robert DeNiro, Palminteri wrote and performed this A Bronx Tale, bringing […]]]>

The Segerstrom Center for the Arts presents “A Bronx Tale” One Man Show with Chazz Palminteri on Saturday, April 2, 2022 at 8:00 p.m. at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall.

In 1988, before it became a hit Broadway musical or feature film starring Robert DeNiro, Palminteri wrote and performed this A Bronx Tale, bringing 18 characters to life in a gripping tale of his difficult childhood on the streets. from the Bronx. And now Center audiences can see his classic coming-of-age story that started it all for him.

This powerful play describes his murderous youth experiences in great detail – including witnessing gang killings – and by the time it was first produced, it had been shown both in Los Angeles and in New York. An unknown theatrical product at the time, Palminteri had stubbornly refused to sell “A Bronx Tale” (offers were in the seven figures) unless he was part of the package as an actor and screenwriter. This eventually sparked the interest of Palminteri idol Robert De Niro, who was looking to make his film debut. De Niro, who saw the potential in “A Bronx Tale”, became Palminteri’s mentor, supporting him all the way, and the rest is history. The film “A Bronx Tale” (1993) received good reviews, with Palminteri as writer and actor, playing Sonny the mobster, and featuring his actress/producer/wife Gianna Palminteri. Since then, Palminteri has been an actor with more than 50 films to his credit, including “The Usual Suspects”, “Bullets Over Broadway” and “Analyze This”.Single tickets for “A Bronx Tale” One Man Show with Chazz Palminteri at the Segerstrom Center for the Arts start at $39 and are available now online at SCFTA.org, at the box office at 600 Town Center Drive in Costa Mesa or by calling (714) 556-2787. For inquiries about group ticket discounts for 10 or more people, call the Group Services office at (714) 755-0236. Born and raised in the Bronx, Chazz Palminteri was the natural choice to receive the passing of the Italian torch in film. In the tradition established in the 1970s by icons such as director Martin Scorsese and actors Robert De Niro, Al Pacino, John Cazale and Joe Pesci, Palminteri brought grit, muscle and evocative realism to the sidewalks of his neighborhood of New York, violent as they are and were. Chazz was born Calogero Lorenzo Palminteri in 1952 in the Bronx, New York, the son of Rose, a housewife, and Lorenzo Palminteri, a bus driver. He grew up in a tough neighborhood in the Bronx, giving her life lessons that would later prove invaluable to her career. He graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School and began pursuing his craft in 1973, studying at the Actor’s Studio. He appeared off Broadway in the early 1980s, while paying his dues as a bouncer and doorman at nightclubs, among other jobs.In 1986, he headed west and found his ethnic qualifications were well-suited for getting tough guy roles. Clever lawyers, steadfast hoods and hard-nosed cops were all part of his streetwise ethnic persona on TV shows such as “Wiseguy” (1987), “Matlock” (1986) and “Hill Street Blues” (1981) . In film, he began by playing a 1930s-style gangster in Sylvester Stallone’s “Oscar” (1991). Although his roles were sharp, well-acted, and with a distinct edge, nothing about them showed he was capable of stronger lead roles. At 41, Palminteri became a star “overnight”. Other important projects quickly fell on him. He received a well-deserved Oscar nomination the following year for his portrayal of a Runyonesque hitman in Woody Allen’s hilarious jazz-era comedy “Bullets Over Broadway” (1994). He was on the right side of the law both in “The Perez Family” (1995), his first romantic role, and then in the crime classic “The Usual Suspects” (1995). He plays the unfortunate brute in “Diabolic” (1996) and writes a second screenplay, “Faithful” (1996), in which he again plays a contract killer, terrorizing both Cher and Ryan O’Neal.Although Palminteri was invariably drawn into rather tight, often violent typography, it was sure and flashy that continues to work strong into the millennium. True to form, his full-lipped growl was spotted in gritty urban environments playing a “Hell’s Kitchen” cop in “One Eyed King” (2001) with actor/producer Armand Assante; a pool hustler and mentor in “Poolhall Junkies” (2002); a mob boss in “In the Fix” (2005); a dirty cop in “Running Scared” (2006); the titular crook as “Yonkers Joe” (2008); a karaoke-loving Italian psychiatrist in “Once More with Feeling” (2009); and an abusive husband and father in “Mighty Fine” (2012). Other later films include starring appearances in “Body Armour” (2007), “The Dukes” (2007), the conman title as “Yonkers Joe” (2008), and “Once More with Feeling” (2009), as well as prime media in “A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints” (2006), “Push” (2006), “Jolene” (2008), “Once Upon a Time in Queens” (2013), “Legend” (2015) , “Vault” (2019) and “Clover” (2020). TV crime also continues to fill its time, earning series credits such as “Kojak” (2005), “Rizzoli & Isles” (2010) and “Godfather of Harlem” (2019). Once in a while, he’ll relax – like in his recurring role as Shorty on the popular sitcom “Modern Family” (2009).

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Wichita’s young talent at the Music Theater Wichita presents the popular Disney show Frozen Jr on March 4 https://acotonline.org/wichitas-young-talent-at-the-music-theater-wichita-presents-the-popular-disney-show-frozen-jr-on-march-4/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 21:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/wichitas-young-talent-at-the-music-theater-wichita-presents-the-popular-disney-show-frozen-jr-on-march-4/ Cardiovascular health: Improving daily habits 3 hours ago sports 12 hours ago Wichita Wind Surge Career Fair 23 hours ago The sister of an American living in Ukraine fears for her… 2 days ago ‘It’s indescribable’: Andover woman from Kyiv shares… 2 days ago 3 leukemia survivors try to raise $100,000 for LLS 2 days […]]]>

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Music, theater and possibly a regatta planned for this weekend https://acotonline.org/music-theater-and-possibly-a-regatta-planned-for-this-weekend/ Fri, 25 Feb 2022 09:30:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-and-possibly-a-regatta-planned-for-this-weekend/ On this last weekend of February, a variety of theater performances and live music – as well as a sailing regatta if the weather permits – await you on the northern Olympic peninsula. Here is a sample of things to do, see and hear. • “Baskertown”, A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, opens tonight for a three-week […]]]>

On this last weekend of February, a variety of theater performances and live music – as well as a sailing regatta if the weather permits – await you on the northern Olympic peninsula.

Here is a sample of things to do, see and hear.

• “Baskertown”, A Sherlock Holmes Mystery, opens tonight for a three-week run at the Port Angeles Community Playhouse, 1235 E. Lauridsen Blvd.

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s classic “The Hound of the Baskervilles” is translated on stage, with Holmes (Tim Thorn) and Doctor Watson (Peter Stone) investigating a legendary curse on the Baskerville family.

The other 40 or so roles are all played by a handful of actors, all of whom change costumes and characters in public view. Meanwhile, multiple projections provide clues and atmospheric effects.

Performances are at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays, Saturdays and Tuesdays and at 2 p.m. on Sundays until March 13. Tickets — $15 general, $8 student — are available at www.pacommunityplayers.org and at the theater the day of the show. All clients must show proof of full vaccination.

A “Too Hot for Socks” dance is taking place tonight in the Castle Ballroom at 651 Cleveland St., Port Townsend.

Doors open at 6 p.m., swing dance instructor Ben White gives a class from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.; then the dancing continues until 9 p.m.

A ticket is required to reserve the dance class; multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Doyle provides the music. Masks and proof of vaccination required. To reserve tickets, visit www.thecastleinpt.com/events.

• The Big Tango by Astor Piazzolla is the centerpiece of two free performances by the Port Townsend Symphony Orchestra.

Along with cellist Pamela Roberts, the ensemble will take the stage at the Chimacum School Auditorium, 91 West Valley Road, Chimacum, first for the dress rehearsal at 7 p.m. tonight, then for the concert at 2 p.m. on Sunday .

It’s first come, first seated tonight, but reservations are strongly advised for Sunday’s event via [email protected] Spectators aged 12 and over must present proof of vaccination at the door and everyone must wear an effective mask inside the auditorium.

More information can be found at PTsymphony.org.

Sean Rankins’ boat Cito, in the foreground, competed in the 2021 Shipwrights Regatta in Port Townsend Bay. This year’s event is scheduled for Saturday noon. (Port Townsend Sailing Association)

• The 31st Annual Shipwrights Regatta is set for noon Saturday on Port Townsend Bay.

The Port Townsend Sailing Association is hosting the event, with details for boaters on PTsail.org and via [email protected] .

Spectators are welcome to watch the race from the Port Townsend waterfront – unless it’s cleared, organizer Jim Heumann said.

“If the current weather forecast holds, it is likely that we will postpone the race. There are high winds and heavy rain expected,” he said on Thursday, adding that the decision will be made this afternoon.

Live music at Finnriver Farm & Cidery124 Center Road, Chimacum, includes three concerts this weekend.

Jazz singer Sarah Shea sings Gershwin, Ella Fitzgerald and other Great American Songbook classics tonight from 5-7 p.m.; then Jonathan Doyle, Matt Weiner and Eric Eagle play jazz and swing from 6 to 8 p.m. on Saturday, and finally Chris Miller and Matt Sircely prepare Americana from 2 to 4 p.m. on Sunday.

An entrance fee to each of these performances supports the musicians. For details, see https://www.finnriver.com/farm-music-event-calendar.

• Auditions for the showcase of new works at Olympic Theater Arts, 414 N. Sequim Ave., Sequim, will be held from 1-4 p.m. Saturday and 6-9 p.m. Monday.

The showcase, a collection of eight short plays by local playwrights, has roles for actors of all ages and experience levels.

Rehearsal times will be decided by the cast and crew of each play; performances will take place from March 25 to April 3. For more information, visit olympic theatrearts.org or call 360-683-7326.

• “The blues is a woman”, a theatrical concert celebrating the female history of blues music, comes to the Port Angeles High School Performing Arts Center, 304 E. Park Ave., Port Angeles, Saturday night.

Information and tickets are available on the Juan de Fuca Foundation for the Arts website, JFFA.org.

• The last weekend of “Angel Street (Gaslight)”, The Victorian thriller now on the Olympic Theater Arts stage, has three performances: 7.30pm tonight and Saturday and 2pm Sunday.

This tale, which has been made into a movie twice, is directed by Sequim’s Ginny Holladay.

For tickets, which are $18 general and $12 for students, visit olympic theatrearts.org. Clients must show proof of vaccination.

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Jefferson County Senior Reporter Diane Urbani de la Paz can be reached at 360-417-3509 or [email protected]



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Duncan Area Arts Hall of Fame inducts five and honors others | Community https://acotonline.org/duncan-area-arts-hall-of-fame-inducts-five-and-honors-others-community/ Wed, 02 Feb 2022 23:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/duncan-area-arts-hall-of-fame-inducts-five-and-honors-others-community/ Deal of the Year took place on Saturday night in Duncan as the area Arts Hall of Fame recognized true talent within the community with a plethora of awards and the third round of inductions while funding also the modernization of the Simmons Center theatre. Taking place on Saturday, January 29, this year’s Hall of […]]]>

Deal of the Year took place on Saturday night in Duncan as the area Arts Hall of Fame recognized true talent within the community with a plethora of awards and the third round of inductions while funding also the modernization of the Simmons Center theatre.

Taking place on Saturday, January 29, this year’s Hall of Fame Spectacular opened with a pre-show at approximately 5:30 p.m. and the main show at 6:30 p.m. The main show opening began with entertainment from Marc Sutton, accompanied by Penny Sutton and LD Jones hosted the evening.

During the first half of the show, various arts organizations, such as the Chisholm Trail Arts Council, Duncan Little Theater and Heartbeat Elite, recognized those who had contributed greatly to them over their years.

Community members who received awards from these organizations included Arlyn Brantley and Larry Gillette, with CTAC, Rodna Cherry and Lois Wilson, with DLT, and Lisa LeNorman-Freeman, with Heartbeat Dance.

After a brief intermission, the Hall of Fame inductees then received their honors.

This year’s five inductees are Ed Apple, Sharon Burum, Gina Flesher, Donald Grantham and the band Summer Breeze.

First, the late Ed Apple, the idea man behind the Duncan Area Arts Hall of Fame, was inducted after a video honoring him was released.

Ed Apple was a Republican trailblazer from Oklahoma who served four terms in the Oklahoma House of Representatives, representing Stephens County. He served eight years as chairman of the Oklahoma Corporation Commission. Recognized as an organizer, motivator and visionary, he was a tireless and respected community leader. Ed was instrumental in forming the Duncan Leadership and Hall of Fame for the Duncan High Athletic Department and the Duncan Area arts community.

His wife, Betty Apple, accepted the award on his behalf.

“Thank you all for being here tonight,” said Betty Apple. “I love thinking about Ed, I love talking about Ed… We weren’t born or raised here, but we’re Duncanites.”

After Apple, Sharon Burum was then inducted.

Burum studied at the Oklahoma Arts Institute and holds a Bachelor of Arts in Theater Arts from Texas Tech University, as well as an M.Ed. from Cameron University. She taught Spanish and drama in public schools for 28 years. Since 2011, she has directed plays for Hodgson’s Studio. She has been active with Duncan Little Theater and Oklahoma Community Theater Assoc. for over 25 years and was the founder of DLT’s Teen Theater. She has directed over 80 productions and chaired a number of State and Region VI festivals. In 2010, she received an Oklahoma Governor’s Arts Award. In 2012, she received DLT’s Lifetime Achievement Award and OCTA’s Hall of Honor. Sharon also sits on the National Board of Directors for the American Association of Community Theaters and has traveled throughout the South as a festival curator. Sharon recently received a Spotlight Award in 2019.

From there, the third nominee, Donald Grantham, was inducted, although he was unable to attend the evening.

Grantham graduated in 1966 from Duncan High School. He participated in the group led by J. Kenneth Smith, the choir led by Allen Clinkscales and studied piano with Mary Helen Wade. He received his Bachelor of Music from the University of Oklahoma, as well as his Master of Music and Doctor of Musical Arts from the University of Southern California. He began his 45-year teaching career at the University of Texas at Austin in 1975. Donald Grantham’s music has been praised for its “elegance, sensitivity, lucidity of thought, clarity of expression, and fine lyricism” in a Citation awarded by the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. His works have been performed by the orchestras of Cleveland, Dallas, Atlanta and the American Composers Orchestra, among others, and by wind ensembles around the world.

From there, Gina Flesher then received her induction into the Hall of Fame.

Flesher moved to Duncan in 1991 and almost immediately became involved with the Chisholm Trail Arts Council. She volunteered for committee work, such as bringing artists to schools, and served on the board of directors. She is currently serving again on the Board of Directors. In 1998 Gina became involved with the Duncan Little Theater and served on the board for two separate terms. She has served as director and producer on several occasions and has worked diligently in the costume business for countless productions. Gina enjoys researching grants and other donors who support the arts. Her volunteer work was recognized when she received the Governor’s Award for the Arts in 2009. In addition to all of her artistic endeavors, she was a registered nurse for 42 years, 30 of which were at the Duncan Regional Hospital.

And finally, the group Summer Breeze was inducted to conclude the evening.

The group, Summer Breeze, was originally formed in 1976 by five young musicians with varied musical backgrounds. Original members included Gaylon Blankenship, Lynn Wilson, Kenny Stevens and Joy Schreiner. Soon after, Craig Combs and Billy Bob Lipscomb joined the band and began developing a sound that would lead to a four-decade span, performing locally and regionally, winning numerous awards throughout their career, including Oklahoma Country Band of the Year, Texhoma Band of the Year and True Value Country Showdown finalist. Summer Breeze have always been known as one of the top cover bands in the state and have had the opportunity to open for over 75 of Nashville’s top artists throughout their careers. The current band members are Keith Woods, Bill Leyrer, Brian Holland, David Adair, Mark Dressler and Shane McClennan. Summer Breeze celebrated 45 years in the entertainment business in 2021 and remains committed to putting on a quality show every time it performs that all ages can enjoy.

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Kid Rock Drops Buffalo Show Over Vaccination Mandates https://acotonline.org/kid-rock-drops-buffalo-show-over-vaccination-mandates/ Fri, 28 Jan 2022 18:15:19 +0000 https://acotonline.org/kid-rock-drops-buffalo-show-over-vaccination-mandates/ Kid Rock is going on tour again this summer. The tour is called the “Bad Reputation Tour” but it will not go through Buffalo. Kid Rock is making headlines today after responding to some of his fans on Facebook while telling them about the new tour. In the video, he says some fans had contacted […]]]>

Kid Rock is going on tour again this summer. The tour is called the “Bad Reputation Tour” but it will not go through Buffalo.

Kid Rock is making headlines today after responding to some of his fans on Facebook while telling them about the new tour. In the video, he says some fans had contacted him with concerns about the upcoming tour and that they would not be going to shows that would require them to be vaccinated or have mask mandates.

His response was, “If there are money orders by the time I arrive, you’ll get your money back…because I won’t show up either.”

He goes on to mention two shows in particular that had to be dropped from the tour due to warrants and they included Buffalo and Toronto.

Here is the entire video. Be aware that the language is NSFW.

Although he didn’t name the location he crossed off his list, you’d assume the Buffalo location he was referring to would be the Key Bank Center. They have had a full vaccination policy in place for months now. While the mask policy states that “guests over the age of 5 and fully vaccinated will not be required to wear a mask, but wearing a mask is strongly encouraged”.

There are 26 shows on Kid Rock’s upcoming tour which begins in Evansville, Indiana and begins April 6. He will finish on September 16 and 17 in his hometown of Detroit.

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Check out the best-selling album from the year you graduated from high school

Do you remember the best album from the year you graduated from high school? Stacker to analyse Billboard data to determine just that, by looking at each year’s best-selling album since 1956. Sales data is not included until 1992, when Nielsen’s SoundScan began collecting computerized numbers.

In chronological order from 1956 to 2020, we present to you the best-selling album from the year you graduated from high school.

WATCH: The evolution of Slipknot’s terrifying masks over the years

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Any idea where he’s been https://acotonline.org/any-idea-where-hes-been/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 23:23:48 +0000 https://acotonline.org/any-idea-where-hes-been/ It was twenty minutes before the opening night curtain of a production called “Rolling Along”. The public gathered in the lobby of the Signature Theater on West Forty-second Street. A woman took out her iPad and cell phone. “I’m at an event you’d like to attend,” was how she began a call, while scrolling through […]]]>

It was twenty minutes before the opening night curtain of a production called “Rolling Along”. The public gathered in the lobby of the Signature Theater on West Forty-second Street. A woman took out her iPad and cell phone. “I’m at an event you’d like to attend,” was how she began a call, while scrolling through CNN’s website. She stopped for as long as it takes to say “What?”

Bill BradleyIllustration by João Fazenda

“Bill Bradley does a one-man show!”

The one hundred and sixty attendees signed documents acknowledging that they could appear in a documentary that would be filmed during the performance, the first in a four-night series. They marched through the theater to find a business card on each seat, as if the show was a giant dinner party: Katrina vanden Heuvel, Charlie Rose, Bob Kerrey, Phil Murphy.

When the lights went out, the stage was empty except for a table and a chair. Bradley appeared, dressed in pants and a pale blue V-neck sweater over a button-up shirt. He faced the audience with a strange, ambiguous expression that suggested an apology was coming. It is possible that as someone who had lived up to immense expectations for most of his life – who had, as John McPhee said in an article for that magazine, “a sense of place where you are” – he felt a bit lost.

For the next hundred minutes, Bradley told the story of his life, organized around refined anecdotes. He started in Crystal City, Missouri, where he was the only child of a small-town bank president with a bad back, and quickly progressed his rise as a high school athlete, basketball prodigy -college ball, Oxford varsity, failing rookie with the Knicks, a star and a two-time champion. And then a rookie senator from New Jersey, a three-term senator from New Jersey, and, in 2000, a presidential candidate who ran in a primary against Al Gore, after which he became an investment banker – well , “my father’s banker’s son.” And, now, perform in a solo piece.

There was anecdote after anecdote about the life of a basketball star. The time he went to see a Russian teacher at Princeton before facing the Russians in the 1964 Olympics and learned some Russian phrases, which he used to scare the Russians off in the gold medal game . How he first felt in the Knicks locker room because he was making more money than anyone else in the league, for reasons that seemed to be tied to him being white. How fans booed him on the pitch that year, throwing coins at him.

In the Signature lobby a few days later, after the final performance, seventy-eight-year-old Bradley was tired but willing; he runs cool and had energy in reserve. He said the idea for the show started after a reception at Princeton, to which he donated his papers in 2017. The university library had compiled an oral history about him, speaking to more than a hundred people. About seventy showed up at the reception. “I prepared a speech where I mentioned each person,” he said.

His friend Manny Azenberg, a theater producer, was present. “Fifty-year-old friend Manny never gave me a compliment,” Bradley said. “But after my speech he came over and said, ‘That sounds like Hal Holbrook. Why don’t you prepare something? And then I just started doing it. Bradley continued, “I would drive around the country to revise it. I would go to Salt Lake or Chicago, or Austin, Texas, or Marin County, to those little theaters. As part of his research, he said, he looked at the work of Holbrook, Billy Crystal and Spalding Gray. Gray always performed his monologues with an open script in front of him, but Bradley memorized his.

“Discipline is discipline,” he said. “You need discipline to hit twenty-five in a row. And you need discipline to memorize something. There’s probably been three to five days in the last eighteen months that I haven’t did this show, or a version of it. After the start of covid, he repeated during long walks in Central Park.

When he was on the road with “Rolling Along”, he would ask the audience for notes after each performance: “A guy in Salt Lake said, ‘You know, senator, this is interesting, but people want guts out of Put even more guts on the floor.” This could be seen as a valid criticism of Bradley’s behavior as a senator, and especially as a presidential candidate. But his talent is perhaps for consistency and a sense of proportion, to play in space. Even in a one-man show, he thought about teamwork. “The key is to find the balance between frankness and excess”, he said. he said, “You want to say enough but leave enough room for people’s imaginations.” ♦

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From a Burger King to a concert hall, with the help of Frank Gehry https://acotonline.org/from-a-burger-king-to-a-concert-hall-with-the-help-of-frank-gehry/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/from-a-burger-king-to-a-concert-hall-with-the-help-of-frank-gehry/ INGLEWOOD, Calif. – 17-year-old high school student Noemi Guzman usually has to find a spot to practice the violin – the instrument she calls “literally, the love of my life.” But the other Saturday morning, Guzman joined a string ensemble that practiced here on a stage almost as grand and acoustic as the place where […]]]>

INGLEWOOD, Calif. – 17-year-old high school student Noemi Guzman usually has to find a spot to practice the violin – the instrument she calls “literally, the love of my life.” But the other Saturday morning, Guzman joined a string ensemble that practiced here on a stage almost as grand and acoustic as the place where she dreams of performing one day: the Walt Disney Concert Hall, home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

“It’s beautiful,” Guzman said during a break from a workout at the Judith and Thomas L. Beckmen YOLA Center, his voice muffled by a mask. “To have a space you can call your own. This is our space. It is created for us.

Inglewood, a working-class town three miles from Los Angeles Airport that was once plagued by crime and poverty, is in the midst of a far-reaching economic transformation, largely focused on sports: SoFi Stadium in 70,000 seater, which opened here last year, now the home of the Rams and Chargers, will be the site of the Super Bowl in February and will be used for the 2028 Summer Olympics. Construction is underway on an arena 18,000 seats for the Los Angeles Clippers, the basketball team.

But the transformation of Inglewood, historically one of the largest black communities in that area, is also exemplified by the 25,000 square foot building where Guzman practiced the other morning. The building, which opened in October, is the first permanent home of the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and is the result of a collaboration between two of the most prominent cultural figures in Los Angeles: Gustavo Dudamel, artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, which oversees YOLA, and Frank Gehry, the architect who designed the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

“It was an old bank,” said Dudamel, a longtime friend of Gehry’s, a classical music lover who can often be spotted in the armchairs of the hall he designed. “Then it was a Burger King – yes, a Burger King! Frank saw the potential. What we have there is a stage the same size as Disney Hall.

The $23.5 million project is a high point for YOLA, the youth music education program that was founded here 15 years ago under Dudamel and which he calls the flagship achievement of his tenure. It hosts 1,500 students, ages 5 to 18, who come to study, practice, and play music on instruments provided by the Los Angeles Philharmonic. It was modeled after El Sistema, the music education program for young people in Venezuela where Dudamel studied the violin as a child.

And it’s one of the most striking examples of the efforts of the nation’s leading arts organizations to roll out youth education programs to communities, rather than concentrating them in inner cities or urban arts districts. . “You can’t just do it downtown,” said Karen Mack, executive director of LA Commons, a community arts organization. “If you really want him to have the impact possible with this program, you have to let the community know about it. It must be accessible. »

Gehry called this idea the “whole game”.

“It’s not the community that should go to Disney Hall,” he said, “it’s Disney Hall that comes to the community.”

For Inglewood, the new YOLA Center is a notable addition to what has been a transformative wave of stadium and arena construction, which has spurred a wave of commercial and residential development (and with it, concerns about subsequent gentrification). often this type of development). Until 2016, Inglewood was primarily known as the home of The Forum, the 45-year-old arena where the Lakers and Kings once played before moving to what was known as Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles. , and Hollywood Park Racetrack, which closed to make way for SoFi Stadium.

“We’ve never been known for cultural enrichment,” said James T. Butts Jr., Inglewood’s mayor. “That’s why it’s so important to us. What’s happening now is a rounding off of society and culture: we won’t be known just for sports and entertainment anymore.

Even before the Beckmen Center opened, YOLA could be a heady experience for a school-age student considering a career in music. Guzman, who joined the youth orchestra seven years ago, has performed bow to bow with members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Dudamel’s baton. YOLA musicians have joined the Philharmonic at Disney Hall, the Hollywood Bowl and on tour to places like Tokyo, Seoul and Mexico City.

Christine Kiva, 15, who started playing the cello at the age of 7, now studies with cellists from the Philharmonie. “It helped me develop my sound as a cellist and work on cello repertoire,” she said.

Inglewood is the fifth economically troubled neighborhood where the youth organization has set up an outpost. But in the first four locations, it shares space with other organizations, forced to fit in without full-fledged performance space or practice rooms. “We were running the project in spaces that weren’t specifically designed for music,” said Chad Smith, general manager of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

Now the words “Judith and Thomas L. Beckmen YOLA Center,” named after the philanthropists and vineyard owners who donated the largest amount to the project, span the facade of the renovated building facing South La Avenue. Brea and the old city center. Dudamel has an office there. Members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic show up regularly to observe practices and work with students.

This building has many rooms for students to practice. There are 272 seats on benches in the main hall, which can be retracted into a wall, allowing the hall to be split in two so that two orchestras can practice at the same time. The acoustics were designed by Nagata Acoustics, who also designed the acoustics for Disney Hall.

The building was owned by Inglewood, who sold it to the Los Angeles Philharmonic. “When we first walked in, there was still the greasy smell of a Burger King,” said Elsje Kibler-Vermaas, vice president for learning at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Gehry, who had previously worked with Dudamel on projects – including designs for the 2012 opera “Don Giovanni” – agreed to take a look at the building, a former bank that opened in 1965.

He said when they brought him there he was struck by the low ceilings from when he was a bank.

“I said, ‘Is it possible to do an intervention?'” recalls Gehry who, even at 92, is involved in a series of design projects across Los Angeles.

By cutting a hole in his ceiling and installing a skylight, and cutting a hole in the floor to deepen the room, he was able to create a performance space with a 45-foot-high ceiling, close to what Disney Hall has . “Children will have a real experience playing in this kind of room,” he said.

It turned out to be a $2 million conversation; the total price, including the purchase of the building and its renovation, was increased from $21 million to $23.5 million to cover the additional cost of raising the roof, installing a well light and the lowering of the floor.

The building was busy the other day. Pupils had come for afternoon music instruction at elementary schools, mostly in Inglewood, and after the snacks – bananas, apples, granola bars – they rushed off for their music reading lessons , percussion and how to follow a conductor.

“Pay attention!” said Mario Raven, guiding his students through a singing and music reading lesson. “Let’s go – one, two, three!”

The brass were outside due to Covid-19 issues (it’s hard to play French horn while wearing a mask). As the planes flew overhead, they performed “High Hopes” from Panic! at the Disco, suggesting that a youth orchestra need not live by Brahms and Beethoven alone.

Students typically take 12 to 18 hours of instruction per week for 44 weeks per year. About a quarter of them end up majoring in music. Smith said this is reflected in the program’s broader aspirations. “Our goal was not to train the greatest musicians in the world,” he said. “Our goal was to provide music education to build students’ self-esteem through music.”

Dudamel said his experience as a boy in Venezuela was formative in bringing the program to Los Angeles. “I grew up in an orchestra where they called us, in the press, ‘the orchestra without a ceiling,'” he said in a Zoom interview from France, where he is now also musical director of the Paris Opera. “Because we had no place to rehearse. We have made a dream come true where young people have the best things they can have. A good room. Great teachers.

“Listen, this is no ordinary music school,” he added. “We don’t claim to be a conservatory. Maybe they won’t be musicians in the future. But our goal is for them to have music in their lives, because it brings beauty, it brings discipline through art.

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Music / theater review | City topics https://acotonline.org/music-theater-review-city-topics/ Wed, 22 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-review-city-topics/ [ad_1] “EVE’S DIARY”: Theater Intime staged a reading of “Eve’s Diary”, presented on October 10 at the Hamilton Murray Theater. Directed by Anna Allport ’23, the show features Mark Twain’s account of the Creation story. Adam (Ally Wonski, standing left) and Eve (Oriana Nelson, standing right) meet. Seated, left to right, Mel Hornyak, Jill Leung, […]]]>


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“EVE’S DIARY”: Theater Intime staged a reading of “Eve’s Diary”, presented on October 10 at the Hamilton Murray Theater. Directed by Anna Allport ’23, the show features Mark Twain’s account of the Creation story. Adam (Ally Wonski, standing left) and Eve (Oriana Nelson, standing right) meet. Seated, left to right, Mel Hornyak, Jill Leung, Elliot Lee, Madeline Buswell and Sheherzad Jamal. (Photo by Elliot Lee)

By Donald H. Sanborn III

Eve’s Journal is a witty but poignant re-imagining of events in the Garden of Eden. Mark Twain (Samuel Clemens) writes from the main character’s perspective, adding intermittent comments from Adam. First published in 1905, this anachronistic version of Genesis is strikingly relevant in its satire on conflict in relationships between men and women, as well as in its reflection on the search for its identity and its meaning. goal.

Twain’s story first appeared in the Christmas issue of Harper’s Bazaar, then in the anthology Their husbands’ wives. In 1906, Harper and Brothers published it in book form. It is the successor of Excerpts from Adam’s Diary (1893).

On October 10, Princeton University’s Intimate Theater presented a live, in-person, staged reading of Eve’s diary, at the Hamilton Murray Theater. The actors and the audience were masked.

Director Anna Allport reveals in a program note that she performed a story monologue in high school and that she was in love with the “surprising delight and complexity” of the work, as well as the unrelenting curiosity. end of Eve, of her stubborn spirit and unshakeable optimism. ”

Because the presentation is staged reading, the only element of production is Greyson Sapio’s lighting. An apple, placed in the center at the edge of the stage, is the only prop. However, there is enough movement to provide visual interest. Allport keeps the pace tight by avoiding pauses between monologues. Twain’s prose is split between seven actors; four actors share Eve’s lines and three read for Adam.

In the role of Eve, Oriana Nelson opens the show. She gets up and – with a spring in her step – moves to the center of the stage. “Saturday, I have almost a day,” she recites, gesturing expressively. Twain immediately imbues Eve with a mixture of self-confidence and philosophical introspection. “I feel like an experience,” she thinks at the beginning of the story, although she feels that her experiences will “one day be important for the historian.” Nelson boosts Eve’s self-confidence. Following

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Bringing theater to everyone – News https://acotonline.org/bringing-theater-to-everyone-news/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 15:47:03 +0000 https://acotonline.org/bringing-theater-to-everyone-news/ [ad_1] About five years ago, the Clarence Brown Theater at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville embarked on an effort to scale up its community engagement activities with underserved communities and families, including veterans, youth, the deaf and hard of hearing, the homeless and individuals on the autism spectrum. “Theater is about community,” said Tom […]]]>


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About five years ago, the Clarence Brown Theater at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville embarked on an effort to scale up its community engagement activities with underserved communities and families, including veterans, youth, the deaf and hard of hearing, the homeless and individuals on the autism spectrum.

“Theater is about community,” said Tom Cervone, CEO of CBT. “Throughout our history, community has been our driving force and we continue to expand our thoughtful engagement with the greater Knoxville area each year. “

A recent performance of A Christmas Carol included Deaf Night at the Theater, a barrier-free experience for members of the hard of hearing and deaf community. The CBT offers an experience for select performances throughout the season, with performers at the box office, concession stand and opening positions, and up to four performers signing on during the show.

“We had 55 children and families present,” said Cervone. “It was a tremendous success.”

On December 18, it will provide a text display captioned with the words and sounds of the performance. Three years ago, the CBT became the first professional theater in Tennessee to offer in-house open captioning.

“A $ 10,000 grant from the Alliance of Women Philanthropists allowed us to buy the equipment and pay for the training to use it,” Cervone said, “so we could create the captioning. internally. Our goal is to break down barriers and make theater more accessible to everyone.

CBT initiatives flow naturally from its tradition of innovative thinking and design, discovery, problem solving, mentoring, collaboration and community development.

“It was the spirit of volunteerism that Clarence Brown (1910) brought to his career as a Hollywood director and ensured that it was instilled in the theater that bears his name,” said Cervone. “Mr. Brown wanted UT theater students to learn from the professionals who come to work and perform at CBT. Additionally, students learn valuable lessons by connecting with different parts of the community and even showcasing their craft. to middle and high school students.

The performers serve at the Night of the Deaf at the Theater.

The theater’s awareness initiatives are varied:

Military and veteran discount

As a member of Blue Star Theaters, the CBT welcomes U.S. military personnel and veterans, spouses and children with discounted tickets to all productions.

“Pay what you can” preview Wednesday

To help make theater accessible to everyone, at all income levels, CBT offers an evening for each production where people can attend for whatever price they choose.

Penny4Arts

In partnership with the Arts and Culture Alliance, CBT participates in the Penny4Arts program, providing every child in County Knox with a ticket to select shows for a dime when accompanied by an adult. The adult ticket is offered at a 10 percent discount. These performances help promote the creativity and artistic enrichment of children in the local community.

Night of faith, hope and love

During pre-pandemic periods of A Christmas Carol, the CBT partnered with the Helen Ross McNabb Center, the Boys and Girls Clubs of the Valley of Tennessee, Agape Outreach Home and the Autism Society of East Tennessee to provide a free night of theater, complete with cookies and hot chocolate .

Family party

In an initiative currently awaiting a pandemic, the CBT has partnered with the Centro Hispano, the Knoxville Area Urban League and the YWCA to offer families the option to reunite for dinner before a dedicated CBT performance. “The idea was to bring back that feeling of a family meal,” said Amanda Middleton, CBT’s external relations and community development manager.

A $ 10 ticket included a buffet dinner and a few words from a designer or production staff member. “It was available to everyone who attended as a family unit, regardless of their definition family unit“, noted Cervone.

School and youth programs

The CBT offers reduced rates to school groups attending morning performances of age-appropriate plays, including A Christmas Carol. In spring 2022 The curious incident of the dog during the night, about an autistic boy, will be offered to high school students, and She kills monsters, about a woman who lost her parents and younger sister in a car crash, will be available to senior high school and middle school students.

As part of their student outreach, Middleton and CBT Director of Grants and Outreach Hana Sherman attends career fairs at local schools including Austin-East Magnet High School, Karns Middle School, Sarah Moore Greene Elementary and Vine Middle Magnet School. “We show the career paths you can take in theater,” Middleton said.

In a long-standing summer tradition, CBT offers high school students two weeks of intensive musical theater training from faculty and graduate students under the direction of distinguished musical theater lecturer Terry Alford.

Another summer program, Shakespeare in Shades, held at the Vine Middle Magnet School in partnership with Community Schools and Knox County Schools, was launched in 2016 and has been offered every year, with the exception of a pandemic break in 2020.

Undergraduate and MFA theater students serve as teachers in the program, which is designed to ease the transition to college by building confidence and increasing reading skills. Students mix theater games with adapted Shakespearean texts as they prepare and stage a performance. In 2020, participants interpreted shortened versions of The Storm, Twelfth Night, and A Midsummer Night’s dream.

“By engaging and exposing young people to live theater,” said Middleton, “we hope to inspire and build the next generation of theatergoers, patrons and actors.”

Participants in Shakespeare in Shades experienced increased confidence and better reading fluency upon entering college.

Support for local school and community programs
CBT also supports local theater companies and performing arts programs in area schools. Led by Professor Kenton Yeager, director of the Department of Theater’s undergraduate program and its Masters of Fine Arts program in theater lighting, the lighting and set design students put their expertise to work to tackle business challenges. complex lighting.

They helped the dance department at Austin-East Magnet High School, the theater department at Bearden High School, the River & Rail Theater Company, the Flying Anvil Theater, the North Carolina Stage Company in Asheville, the Oak Ridge Playhouse, Pellissippi State Community College, and West High School.

A high school theater called and asked for effects they could use in Annie takes your gun“Yeager said,” and we helped him. Sometimes that includes accessing and upgrading outdated lighting systems.

The CBT also donates used sets to high school theater departments and local theater troupes. All of the Candid, which had many complex elements, was 90 percent recycled.

“Diversity and inclusion in all its forms is part of our mission statement,” said Sherman. “Whether we’re presenting performances to those who are often excluded, introducing children and youth to theater, or supporting local performing arts programs, the Clarence Brown Theater strives to bring theater to life. the widest possible community.

CONTACT:

Brooks Clark (nclark5@utk.edu, 865-974-5471)

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