austin texas – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:39:13 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png austin texas – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 🌱 $1 Corn Dogs on National Corn Dog Day + Visit AmptUp at SXSW https://acotonline.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-1-corn-dogs-on-national-corn-dog-day-visit-amptup-at-sxsw/ Tue, 15 Mar 2022 12:39:13 +0000 https://acotonline.org/%f0%9f%8c%b1-1-corn-dogs-on-national-corn-dog-day-visit-amptup-at-sxsw/ Hey, neighbors! It’s me again, Gabriela Couvillion, your host of the Austin Daily. First, today’s weather forecast: Sunny, pleasant and warm. High: 83 Low: 53. Here are today’s top stories in Austin: Saturday, March 19 is National Corn Dog Day and in celebration, “Lightlife, a leading provider of certified vegan and non-GMO plant-based protein products,” […]]]>

Hey, neighbors! It’s me again, Gabriela Couvillion, your host of the Austin Daily.


First, today’s weather forecast:

Sunny, pleasant and warm. High: 83 Low: 53.


Here are today’s top stories in Austin:

  1. Saturday, March 19 is National Corn Dog Day and in celebration, “Lightlife, a leading provider of certified vegan and non-GMO plant-based protein products,” and the food service establishment Corn Dog Guy will be selling corn dogs. classic corn for $1 in Austin. Corn Dog Guy representatives said, “Our food truck is all about offering something appealing and ready-to-use and Lightlife helps us achieve that with an alternative protein that comes from simple, plant-based ingredients that tastes good.” The $1 hot dogs will only be available in person at The Corn Dog Guy Food Truck, located at The Ballroom at Spider House at 2906 Fruth St. For more information about Lightlife, visit www.lightlife.com and to check out The Corn Dog Dude, go to www.thecorndogguy.com. More details on the event on: (VEGWORLD Magazine)
  2. A new booking platform called AmptUp “joined Austin Texas Musicians at a launch event” on Monday, March 14 at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin. The new platform “works to help independent artists, women, and people of color succeed” by “making it easier to book and pay for musicians” and working to “level the playing field so that musicians of color, women, LGBTQIA+ and musicians with disabilities have a better chance on stage.” This week, “independent artists and venue owners can connect with AmptUp” during SXSW. Click here for more information on AmptUp and visit: (KEYE TV CBS Austin)
  3. Bobby Cannavale and Rose Byrne were at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema South Lamar in Austin on Sunday, March 13. The celebrities were on a date to attend the premiere of “Seriously Red” during the SXSW Conference and Festivals event at the cinema. For this and more celebrity info at SXSW 2022 Tour: (Wonderwall)

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Today in Austin:


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All right, all is well for today. I’ll be back in your inbox tomorrow morning with your next update!

Gabriela Couvillion

About me: I am a working mother of two adult sons and a lifelong resident of San Antonio. I received a BA in Spanish from the University of Texas at San Antonio, and in my free time I immerse myself in creative writing. Thanks for reading Patch, and please let us know if you have any news and events that our readers might enjoy!

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Daniel Radcliffe on What to Expect From the ‘Weird Al’ Yankovic Biopic (Exclusive) https://acotonline.org/daniel-radcliffe-on-what-to-expect-from-the-weird-al-yankovic-biopic-exclusive/ Mon, 14 Mar 2022 22:04:21 +0000 https://acotonline.org/daniel-radcliffe-on-what-to-expect-from-the-weird-al-yankovic-biopic-exclusive/ By Jackie Willis, ETOnline.com. 2 hours ago Daniel Radcliffe is ready for the world to see his transformation into “Weird Al” Yankovic for the upcoming biopic about the comedian’s life. Last month, fans received a glimpse of Radcliffe in character, and although his Yankovic incarnation required some time in the hair and makeup chair, part […]]]>

By Jackie Willis, ETOnline.com.

2 hours ago

Daniel Radcliffe is ready for the world to see his transformation into “Weird Al” Yankovic for the upcoming biopic about the comedian’s life.

Last month, fans received a glimpse of Radcliffe in character, and although his Yankovic incarnation required some time in the hair and makeup chair, part of his look was his. “I grew the mustache, so the mustache was mine because I didn’t want to wear a fake one every day,” the 32-year-old actor told ET’s Cassie DiLaura during the talk and talks. SXSW 2022 “Lost City” premiere in Austin, Texas, adding that the wig was “pretty quick” to put on and take off.

Radcliffe said Evan Rachel Wood, who plays Madonna in the biopic, had “a much more complex process” to make her look proper. “We really had an amazing hair and makeup team. I don’t know how they did what they did in 18 days. It was all up to them,” he said.

As for what fans can expect from this biopic, Radcliffe joked that it was “the 100% true story of Al’s life.”

“I’m going to keep doing this for as long as I can,” he mused before adding, “because it’s crazy. I hope it’s going to be a lot of fun.”

“Weird: The Al Yankovic Story” will air on The Roku Channel, but a release date has yet to be announced.

Daniel Radcliffe
— Photo: Background grid

Along with playing “Weird Al,” Radcliffe was also excited to talk with ET about portraying a villain in “The Lost City” alongside Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum. The ‘Harry Potter’ star plays Fairfax, who kidnaps novelist Loretta Sage (Bullock) to help her locate a treasure in the jungle she mentions in her book. Things only get funnier when Alan (Tatum), the cover model of Loretta’s romance novel, rushes in to try and save her.

“If you have a scenario where they were like, ‘Do you want to be the villain of Sandra Bullock and Channing Tatum’s heroes?’ You’d be like, ‘Yeah sure. I love them both and I loved the script,” he said of his role. “The script is really, really funny. [Directors] Adam and Aaron [Nee] did an amazing job of doing it. It was a very easy choice.

As for Bullock and Tatum’s on-screen chemistry, Radcliffe witnessed it firsthand. “I think chemistry mostly comes down to openness and openness and being curious about the other person you’re working with, and both Channing and Sandra are,” he told the praise of his co-stars. “I think they’d both be really difficult people not to have chemistry, they’re both incredibly nice and fun. I mean Channing can throw a party on his own in the room, so I I feel like it was very easy for them to find that.

Adam Nee agrees. “It was hard to argue them because it was so much fun,” the director told ET. “I mean, Channing and Sandy’s chemistry on set…they really giggled and giggled all day. They are wonderful, truly amazing.

“The Lost City” hits theaters on March 25.

RELATED CONTENT:

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A kickin’ Michelle Yeoh and a movie called ‘B—A—.’ Yes, SXSW is back. https://acotonline.org/a-kickin-michelle-yeoh-and-a-movie-called-b-a-yes-sxsw-is-back/ Sat, 12 Mar 2022 11:52:07 +0000 https://acotonline.org/a-kickin-michelle-yeoh-and-a-movie-called-b-a-yes-sxsw-is-back/ AUSTIN, TEXAS – MARCH 11: Michelle Yeoh attends the ‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ Opening Night Premiere during the 2022 SXSW Conference & Festivals at Paramount Theater on March 11, 2022 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images for SXSW) Photo: Rich Fury, Staff/Getty Images for SXSW Just like the martial arts mom in […]]]>

AUSTIN, TEXAS – MARCH 11: Michelle Yeoh attends the ‘Everything Everywhere All At Once’ Opening Night Premiere during the 2022 SXSW Conference & Festivals at Paramount Theater on March 11, 2022 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images for SXSW)

Photo: Rich Fury, Staff/Getty Images for SXSW

Just like the martial arts mom in “Everything Everywhere All at Once,” the time-traveling action-fantasy flick starring Michelle Yeoh and Jamie Lee Curtis that had its world premiere at the 2022 edition of Austin’s South by Southwest on Friday night, the festival reappears on its feet after fighting for its life.

The annual spring of music, film, culture and tech-palooza, which in 2019 reportedly drew more than 280,000 people to Austin during its 10-day run, was dropped at the last minute in 2020 due to the looming COVID crisis, then migrated online in 2021. Were thong-wearing swarms of 6th Street now an extinct species?

It had been three years since Austin resonated with the strong SXSW buzz, and as of Friday, things were looking a little subdued at the Austin Convention Center — the registration site and location for many presentations and panels — compared to the opening days of the past. But, in the late afternoon – when a long line of moviegoers braved the cold, windy weather for two hours to enter the crowded screening of “Everything, Everywhere, All At Once” at the Paramount Theater of a capacity of 1300 people – the crowds were ready to party like it was 1999, or at least 2019.

While SXSW’s opening night audience is almost always ecstatic – even when the movies aren’t particularly good – there was an extra spark of electricity on Friday night, as if everyone was at both relieved to enjoy a movie together again and determined to return to the way things were through sheer force of fandom and willpower.

South by Southwest

South by Southwest runs until March 20. For more information, sxsw.com

The film opens March 18 in New York and Los Angeles and across the rest of the country over the following two weeks.

SXSW Vice President and Director Janet Pierson and the film’s lead cast were greeted with loud, sustained applause as they took the stage and there was a standing ovation for Yeoh after the film. Pierson and Yeoh both echoed that sentiment in their opening remarks ahead of “Everything Everywhere All at Once.” “I’m so excited to be here,” Yeoh said. “Films are shared experiences.”

As for the movie itself, directed by the duo who work as Daniels (Daniel Kwan and Daniel Scheinert, the guys behind the flattering “Swiss Army Man”), critics seemed to be as jazzed up as audiences.

“Here is an orgiastic work of slaphappy genius that functions not so much as a narrative film as a particle accelerator – or perhaps a cosmic washing machine – that two 12-year-old psychotics have devised in the hope of reconciling the anxiety of what our lives could be with the beauty of what they are,” David Ehrlich sang in his A-grade review in Indie Wire while Variety’s Peter Debruge was only slightly less impressed when he said: ‘There are enough ideas in ‘Everything Everywhere All at Once’ to fuel a dozen films, or even a TV series in its own right, but the Daniels have turned it all into 139 explosive and emotionally draining minutes.

One such moment is the SXSW peak, when a movie (or band or app) that few outside the cloistered quarters of SXSW have even heard of becomes an utter obsession. No doubt there will be several more this year – including the horror comedy “Bodies Bodies Bodies” starring Pete Davidson, Lee Pace and Amandla Stenberg and the highly anticipated “Apollo 10 1/2: A Space Age Childhood”. by Richard Linklater. memory of having grown up in Houston at the time of this famous giant leap for humanity.

But all is not enough as it was at SXSW, when the festival enveloped attendees in a seemingly hardened, hermetically sealed cocoon against the outside world and the most important thing in your life was to make your way to a screening of “Bitch Ass (yes, a real title for a real movie this year).

According to the Austin American-Statesman, Austin is in stage two of its five-stage COVID alert system, and was in the dreaded stage five just two weeks ago. For SXSW attendees, that means masking at screenings, a testing site at the Convention Center, and encouragement to use the CLEAR Health Pass app for those who are vaccinated.

And the unfolding terror of the Ukrainian invasion manifests in SXSW donating to humanitarian relief efforts and hosting a Ukrainian showcase on March 19 featuring Igor Grohotsky, KAZKA and SpivOberta while also hosting panels such as “Ukraine, a world in flux and the EU’s response” and “Ukraine for peace: supporting creators and innovators.” (Edited to add: There were pro-Ukrainian protesters at the Alamo Drafthouse on South Lamar on Saturday.)

On Twitter, SXSW went after Governor Greg Abbott for supporting an investigative order into transgender care.

While politics has long been a part of the debates — former Democratic President Barack Obama and current Republican Senator from Kentucky Rand Paul have appeared here — it can be increasingly difficult for attendees to ignore what’s going on. on the rest of the planet, even if only for a few days.

Still, welcome back, SXSW. It’s been too long. Now excuse me while I stand in line for “Bitch Ass”.

cary.darling@chron.com




  • cary darling

    Cary Darling joined the Houston Chronicle in 2017 where he writes about arts, entertainment and pop culture, with a focus on film and media. A native of Los Angeles and a graduate of Loyola Marymount University, he was a reporter or editor at the Orange County Register, the Miami Herald and the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. Additionally, he has freelanced for a number of publications, including the Los Angeles Times and the Dallas Morning News.

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Lecturer Kitty Dubin Celebrates 25th Anniversary of Playwriting Donated to OU – 2022 – School of Music, Theater & Dance – News – OU Magazine https://acotonline.org/lecturer-kitty-dubin-celebrates-25th-anniversary-of-playwriting-donated-to-ou-2022-school-of-music-theater-dance-news-ou-magazine/ Wed, 09 Mar 2022 16:07:21 +0000 https://acotonline.org/lecturer-kitty-dubin-celebrates-25th-anniversary-of-playwriting-donated-to-ou-2022-school-of-music-theater-dance-news-ou-magazine/ Kitty Dubin is celebrating her 25th birthday this year by teaching playwriting classes at Oakland University. She established the first class in 1997 and now teaches beginner and advanced classes, which are offered through both the School of Music, Theater and Dance and the Creative Writing program, which is part of the Department of English. […]]]>

Kitty Dubin is celebrating her 25th birthday this year by teaching playwriting classes at Oakland University. She established the first class in 1997 and now teaches beginner and advanced classes, which are offered through both the School of Music, Theater and Dance and the Creative Writing program, which is part of the Department of English.

“There were no playwriting classes at Oakland University in 1997,” Dubin said. “I thought the OU could benefit from such a class, and I was convinced that I was well suited for the position, but first I had to convince Michael Gillespie, then President of the School of Music , theater and dance (SMTD) that I was up to the task.

Kitty Dubin

At the time, Dubin had a master’s degree in English, a year-long graduate course in playwriting, and several of his own plays had been produced at Michigan equity theaters, including The Purple Rose and The Jewish. Ensemble Theatre, as well as The Live Oak Theater in Austin, Texas.

“I felt I had a solid grasp of the craft of playwriting, plus a decade of experience as a professional playwright,” she said.

After several tries, Dubin was finally able to convince Gillespie to allow him to teach his first playwriting class in the winter of 1997. At first, the class was only worth two credits and met one evening a week. Eighteen theater students signed up for the course, and it was an immediate success.

“These students saw that there was a connection between playwriting and their other theatrical studies like acting and directing,” Dubin said.

Due to the initial success, playwriting was expanded to a four-credit class, and then it was cross-listed to the English department. Subsequently, an advanced class was added as there was a demand for those who wanted to continue studying playwriting.

“I received another significant increase in enrollment in 2011 when the English department developed a new major in creative writing,” Dubin said. “The playwriting classes now met the requirements for this major, which brought additional students into my classes.”

Dubin brings both his passion and decades of experience as a playwright to his class. She emphasizes the importance of creating solid structure, relatable characters, and natural-sounding dialogue. It also replicates the development process followed by professional playwrights after completing a first draft in that plays are read aloud by classmates and a feedback session follows that focuses on what works and what needs to be improved.

Students then write a second draft and maybe even a third. Dubin also invites established playwrights as guest speakers to share their experiences of pursuing an interest in playwriting after graduating from college.

Dubin frequently uses his theater contacts to find opportunities to perform his students’ plays. She also created opportunities here in Oakland.

For several years, she partnered with Professor Tom Suda, who taught directing, to present a showcase where student directors each staged a play written by the students.

Dubin resumed this partnership with Professor David Gram and his directing students this year to present an evening of student-written plays that showcased the talents of student actors, playwrights and directors.

Dubin continues to mentor his students long after graduation, introducing them to the local theater network, encouraging them to submit their work to various playwriting competitions, and continuing to help them refine their work. It is a measure of his success that nearly 130 of his students’ plays have received awards, readings, or full productions at theaters in Michigan and beyond.

Although there are too many students to name who have been successful in their work, Dubin said there are a number of students who deserve major recognition:

• Anetria Cole and Franco Vitella both won MaTilDa awards in playwriting. The Complete Cole Game, Bronzeville Gold, has received numerous readings and full productions and has been selected for inclusion in the National Black Theater Festival. Cole and Vitella also performed plays at the American College Theater Festival.

Vitella and Kassandra Dunaj had their complete plays produced by the School of Music, Drama and Dance. Vitella was also selected to participate in the Kennedy Center Playwright Initiative.

Matt Bell became an accomplished, nationally known fiction writer who now teaches creative writing at Arizona State University. His one-act plays have been performed in Heartlande Theater’s Play by Play and have been included in two of OU’s staging showcases.

Martin McArthur’s play, The moment he hears ithad a staged reading at OU in 2016, directed by David Gram, and a staged reading afterwards at Theater Nova in Ann Arbor.

Lauren Knox Mounsey teaches acting and is artist-in-residence at the Purple Rose Theater Company. She also had one of her own plays produced at the Purple Rose.

Jacquelyn Priskorn Floyd was a student in the first playwriting class at OU in 1997 and returned to take the advanced class in 2014. During that time she had 14 readings, received 4 awards, and had 62 productions of his short plays.

Recent students whose plays have been performed for the public include: Emily Nichter, Alessia Fionda, Xochi Rios-Ellis, Kaye Hoffmeyer and Lucas Jeffrey.

“A lot of times people talk about a project they created and grew as their baby,” Dubin said. “Certainly, this term applies to me. I love watching my students grow and develop their talent, and I’m thrilled to be able to help them transition from the classroom into professional theater.

“Each year I teach my classes a little differently because I’ve changed, the students have changed, and the world has changed,” she added. “The plays we study, as well as the plays students write, must reflect these changes. My goals are always to keep my classes fresh and current, and to maintain a high degree of student engagement.

Over the past 25 years, Dubin said his enthusiasm for teaching playwriting has never wavered.

“I’m as excited to teach a class now as I was on the very first day,” she said. “I can’t imagine a job that would be more personally fulfilling and I’m grateful to Oakland for giving me that first opportunity and supporting me every step of the way.”

To learn more about playwriting classes at Oakland University, visit the School of Music, Theater and dance and creative writing websites.

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Conclusion: Bernadette Peters delivers a concert worthy of a legend at Lied on Saturday | Arts and theater https://acotonline.org/conclusion-bernadette-peters-delivers-a-concert-worthy-of-a-legend-at-lied-on-saturday-arts-and-theater/ Sun, 27 Feb 2022 04:35:38 +0000 https://acotonline.org/conclusion-bernadette-peters-delivers-a-concert-worthy-of-a-legend-at-lied-on-saturday-arts-and-theater/ Engaging and highly entertaining, Broadway legend Bernadette Peters captivated a packed house at the Lied Center for Performing Arts on Saturday with a beautifully paced concert that showcased her always stunning voice, stagecraft and, subtly, musical acting. actor who won him Emmy and Tony awards. Accompanied by her trio and an eight-piece Lincoln orchestra, Peters, […]]]>

Engaging and highly entertaining, Broadway legend Bernadette Peters captivated a packed house at the Lied Center for Performing Arts on Saturday with a beautifully paced concert that showcased her always stunning voice, stagecraft and, subtly, musical acting. actor who won him Emmy and Tony awards.

Accompanied by her trio and an eight-piece Lincoln orchestra, Peters, dressed in a dress and heels, flew through the 80-minute show, singing and dancing on stage to some songs, working spectacularly on the microphone standing on top of others and, to a sultry version of Peggy Lee’s classic “Fever,” she climbed onto the piano, lay down and kicked her legs.

Peters’ show could easily be called a tribute to Stephen Sondheim, as eight of its 15 songs were from Sondheim musicals. This is hardly a surprise. Peters appeared in eight Sondheim productions and was a close friend of Sondheim, who died last year.

She’s also the main performer of her music – as could be heard from the opening “Let Me Entertain You” to the closing “Being Alive” and, most importantly, on the show stopper of the night, a “Send in the Clowns” quietly touching.

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Along the way, she visited the Rodgers and Hammerstein catalog for songs from “Carousel,” “State Fair” and “South Pacific” for a jaw-dropping revamp of “There’s No such thing as a dame” to bump and grind drums, get this, original Mouseketeer Cubby O’Brien.

Peters, who told a few jokes, says she usually sings just for the audience. But – that’s where the acting comes in – you can see her slip into the character of Sally Plummer from Sondheim’s “Follies” as she sang “In Buddy’s Eyes” and “Losing My Mind” and become Dolly Levi as she spelled out the story to “Hello Dolly,” then strutted and danced through “Before the Parade Passes By” and “So Long Dearie.”

Fittingly, Peters’ first Lincoln show in more than a decade ended with “Kramer’s Song,” a lullaby she wrote to accompany a children’s book to benefit Broadway Parks, her charity. charity for the adoption and rescue of animals. She will return home to her dogs on Sunday, leaving about 2,000 Nebraskans with memories of a sight worthy of a legend.

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Best beer in Austin Texas at best https://acotonline.org/best-beer-in-austin-texas-at-best/ Mon, 31 Jan 2022 09:39:15 +0000 https://acotonline.org/best-beer-in-austin-texas-at-best/ Best Beer in Austin Texas. Mark a special occasion by slashing giant bottles of deus, served in champagne flutes. 1208 w 4th st, austin, tx 78703. Best Beer Gardens in Austin, TX Unpakt Blog from blog.unpakt.com Another newcomer to Austin’s craft beer scene, zilker brewing’s flagship ipa is one of the smoothest and silkiest ipas […]]]>

Best Beer in Austin Texas. Mark a special occasion by slashing giant bottles of deus, served in champagne flutes. 1208 w 4th st, austin, tx 78703.

Best Beer Gardens in Austin, TX Unpakt Blog from blog.unpakt.com

Another newcomer to Austin’s craft beer scene, zilker brewing’s flagship ipa is one of the smoothest and silkiest ipas on this list. You have to try it if you like chocolate stouts. In a nutshell, hold the rocks – pure and simple.

Best Beer Gardens in Austin, TX Unpakt Blog

Sudden death beer glasses. It’s one of the few places I’ve taken a flight and haven’t” more. 4112 medical pkwy (42nd st), austin, tx. Best beer selection in Austin, TX.

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Why is every Pixar movie sent directly to Disney+? https://acotonline.org/why-is-every-pixar-movie-sent-directly-to-disney/ Wed, 26 Jan 2022 14:48:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/why-is-every-pixar-movie-sent-directly-to-disney/ As the world slowly but surely returns to some form of normalcy, cinematic releases are following suit. Spider-Man: No Way Home brought people back to the cinema in droves, and it seemed like the days of early streaming releases were over, especially for entertainment giant Disney. But, alas, this is not the case for a […]]]>

As the world slowly but surely returns to some form of normalcy, cinematic releases are following suit.

Spider-Man: No Way Home brought people back to the cinema in droves, and it seemed like the days of early streaming releases were over, especially for entertainment giant Disney.

But, alas, this is not the case for a specific part of the Disney empire. Pixar’s next film, Turning Red, has been confirmed to get a Disney+ streaming release on March 11, 2022, with no plans for the film to hit theaters.

This is partly understandable given the global increase in cases of the Omicron variant. However, Disney didn’t even offer a dual movie and streaming release like it did for Black Widow. Instead, the film will only be available on the streaming service. Timing seems even less of a factor when you consider that Turning Red isn’t the first Pixar movie to skip theaters — the studio’s last two features, Soul and Luca, suffered the same fate.

The decision came as a shock to many Pixar employees, according to Insider. An anonymous staff member said, “We all thought ‘Turning Red’ would be our return to the big screen, and everyone at the studio was so excited that it was that particular movie. It was quite a blow.”

It’s even more striking when you consider that Disney gave theatrical releases to Encanto and Raya and the Last Dragon – both of which were created by Walt Disney Animation Studios, another in-house studio separate from Pixar. This begs the question: why does Disney treat Pixar films any differently than its other animated productions?

Encanto

2021 has been a successful year for Disney+. The platform regularly hosted near-back-to-back Marvel shows, brought back a second season of The Mandalorian, and offered movies that weren’t otherwise accessible to people who couldn’t make it to the theaters.

But 2022 might be more of an uphill battle for Disney+. The next Marvel series won’t debut until March, and with lukewarm reception for The Book of Boba Fett and rising prices for other platforms looming on the horizon, Disney is no doubt looking for ways to entice subscribers to stay.

In a quote to Variety, Jeff Bock, media analyst at Exhibitor Relations, believes Pixar movies help keep subscribers from filming, saying, “The fact that they’ve done it with three movies in a row makes me wonder. believe it really helps.”

The same article also points out that it’s significantly more expensive for Disney to push a movie into theaters than it is to put it on the streaming service, with the studio’s average film costing around $100 million to promote.

With marketing costs so high, it’s vital that theatrical releases make their money. But, as The Washington Post points out, families with young children are less likely to go to the movies during the pandemic than adults.

Encanto only managed to pocket $200 million worldwide in theaters and then went to Disney+ after just a month. To give some perspective, previous Walt Disney Animation Studios films such as Moana and Coco managed between $500 million and $800 million before the pandemic.

Moana

Forbes notes that by sending these films to Disney+ early and making them available ‘for free’ (rather than Premier Access), the average watch time of these films increased, which could help generate and retain more viewership. subscriptions. This additional commitment to the streaming service may be worth more to Disney than the relatively meager box office returns its animated features are currently recouping.

In that case, it might not just be Pixar’s problem – Walt Disney Animation Studios’ next film, Strange World, might not make it to theaters either, especially if Turning Red succeeds on Disney+.

The icing on the cake is that Nielsen reports that Luca was the most streamed movie in the US last year – though it’s worth noting that this survey didn’t include HBO Max titles. Either way, the film still managed to beat out some stiff competition, proving there’s plenty of appetite for Pixar to stream.

Lucas

Soul received similarly positive reception, with a source telling Insider, “Disney was ecstatic about the numbers,” when the film was initially released on Disney+. This release was largely out of necessity at the time, as many countries were in total lockdown and therefore cinemas were closed.

Pixar films also have the advantage of being evergreen films. It’s a safe and comfortable watch for a night curled up on the couch. They don’t need a giant IMAX screen or a revolutionary sound system to be enjoyed – they’re family fun movies for rainy days.

Plus, with the exception of the occasional sequel, they don’t require any prior knowledge of other movies to enjoy. That’s something that can’t be said for new releases from the MCU and Star Wars, two of Disney+’s other key properties.

With classics like Toy Story, Monsters Inc. and Up, it’s no wonder Pixar continues to attract the streaming service.

Streaming releases for movies have become rarer in 2022. With HBO Max now forgoing its new movie releases, Disney is one of the few services that still offers the ability to watch new movies from the comfort of home. , and this is something that can entice viewers to stay subscribed.

light year

So what does this mean for Pixar’s future on Disney+? It depends on three things: Turning Red’s reception, the subscriber trend on the platform, and the state of theaters during COVID.

The next Pixar film on the books is Lightyear, a spin-off from the wildly popular Toy Story franchise. Currently, the release is scheduled for June 17, 2022, but the release strategy has yet to be revealed.

With Chris Evans in the lead role and an action-packed plot, this Pixar movie would lend itself to a run at the movies. However, if Disney+ finds further streaming success with Turning Red, the argument for not making this film exclusive to the platform will be a tough sell.

What I’m watching this week

Queer Eye is back for a sixth season, and if you need heartwarming TV and a good shoutout, then The Fabulous Five has you covered. Karamo, Tan, Bobby, Antoni and Jonathan travel to Austin, Texas to transform other people’s lives.

Interestingly, this season got caught up in the whirlwind of the pandemic – but the show managed to go on, even with one of the guests caught in the middle.

You can watch Queer Eye season six on Netflix – subscriptions start from £5.99/$9.99 per month.

]]> Sarah Brightman soars with the help of a dedicated design team and ChamSys https://acotonline.org/sarah-brightman-soars-with-the-help-of-a-dedicated-design-team-and-chamsys/ Mon, 24 Jan 2022 08:57:36 +0000 https://acotonline.org/sarah-brightman-soars-with-the-help-of-a-dedicated-design-team-and-chamsys/ Sarah Brightman soars with the help of a dedicated design team and ChamSys United States – The Strathmore Music Center is a modern multi-disciplinary arts space in glass and steel. Well-appointed with excellent acoustics, it resembles many other performance halls in American suburbs. But in the past month, this fairly typical space has become, in […]]]>

Sarah Brightman soars with the help of a dedicated design team and ChamSys

United States – The Strathmore Music Center is a modern multi-disciplinary arts space in glass and steel. Well-appointed with excellent acoustics, it resembles many other performance halls in American suburbs. But in the past month, this fairly typical space has become, in the words of one reviewer, “a place of paradise.”

It happened when Sarah Brightman took the stage as part of her A Christmas Symphony tour. The world’s most renowned classical/crossover soprano brought her transformative magic to Strathmore and 16 other venues across the United States during the tour, enchanting audiences with her angelic three-octave voice, as she weaves a range of music from Puccini to John Lennon in its two-hour show (plus an intermission).

Supporting famous artists as his voice soared to the skies was elegantly shimmering lighting and show design by Nathan Taylor. The timecoded light show was programmed by Plymouth, UK-based LD Jason Hyne using the NEG Earth suite, and performed during the US tour by Austin, Texas-based LD Ruby Leigh. of Allume Live Productions.

Traveling with the team on the tour was the ChamSys MagicQ 250M stadium, an ideal choice for many reasons according to Hyne. One of the most obvious, he says, given the relentless month-long touring schedule, is the console’s compact, foldable design.

“Portability was critically important given the travel schedule,” Hyne said. “I visited ChamSys in the UK for a demonstration of the 250M at the end of July 21. Straight away I knew this was the desk for me. I used the Chamsys 250M desk during my autumn in the UK with the Kaiser Chiefs festival shows and Roger Taylor’s ‘The Outsider’ tour, and it has been an eye opener to me just how powerful this compact music stand can be when programming and operation of shows.

Hyne is quick to point out, however, that portability couldn’t come at the expense of performance on the Brightman tour. In that regard, he was extremely happy that the console came with the full ChamSys Stadium suite, an invaluable asset in helping Leigh run the timecoded show across the wide range of venues on the tour.

For her part, Leigh described how the powerful MagicQ MQ250 with its large, intuitive user interface, plus features like motorized faders and easy-to-navigate Cue Stack tracks helped her on the tour.

“Most of the time we’ve played in theaters with a capacity of 2,500 or more with varying stage sizes,” she said. “The platform itself was quite adaptable, so it worked well in larger, tighter spaces. I had to update the different positions during the tour. ChamSys allowed us to very easily adjust the position pallets to fit the space of each room.

“Making sure the timecode really syncs up is crucial in any timecoded show and this tour is certainly no different,” Leigh continued. “Every intensity and color fade has to be precise, otherwise the effect of the mood can be ruined for the audience, so the precise control the console gave me was very important.”

With all the lighting elements brought together smoothly, the design team was able to reflect the deeply moving power of Brightman’s performance. “All of the scenes that we’ve set for the different songs are dynamic in their own way,” Leigh said. “Some are much more dramatic while others are extremely subtle and ethereal. Our goal as a team was to help the audience be impressed with Sarah and the impact of her voice without being distracted by a clack of finger.

Seemingly minor tweaks, like changing a two-second intensity fade with a single device into a single benchmark inside a playback page, made a big difference during the holiday tour, noted Leigh.

It’s doubtful that fans who came to Sarah Brightman’s tour knew the steps necessary to accomplish this feat, but when the great entertainer wrapped up her final show on Dec. 21 in New Orleans, it was that kind of attention to detail that had helped them have a memorable vacation experience.

January 24, 2022

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Any idea where he’s been https://acotonline.org/any-idea-where-hes-been/ Sun, 23 Jan 2022 23:23:48 +0000 https://acotonline.org/any-idea-where-hes-been/ It was twenty minutes before the opening night curtain of a production called “Rolling Along”. The public gathered in the lobby of the Signature Theater on West Forty-second Street. A woman took out her iPad and cell phone. “I’m at an event you’d like to attend,” was how she began a call, while scrolling through […]]]>

It was twenty minutes before the opening night curtain of a production called “Rolling Along”. The public gathered in the lobby of the Signature Theater on West Forty-second Street. A woman took out her iPad and cell phone. “I’m at an event you’d like to attend,” was how she began a call, while scrolling through CNN’s website. She stopped for as long as it takes to say “What?”

Bill BradleyIllustration by João Fazenda

“Bill Bradley does a one-man show!”

The one hundred and sixty attendees signed documents acknowledging that they could appear in a documentary that would be filmed during the performance, the first in a four-night series. They marched through the theater to find a business card on each seat, as if the show was a giant dinner party: Katrina vanden Heuvel, Charlie Rose, Bob Kerrey, Phil Murphy.

When the lights went out, the stage was empty except for a table and a chair. Bradley appeared, dressed in pants and a pale blue V-neck sweater over a button-up shirt. He faced the audience with a strange, ambiguous expression that suggested an apology was coming. It is possible that as someone who had lived up to immense expectations for most of his life – who had, as John McPhee said in an article for that magazine, “a sense of place where you are” – he felt a bit lost.

For the next hundred minutes, Bradley told the story of his life, organized around refined anecdotes. He started in Crystal City, Missouri, where he was the only child of a small-town bank president with a bad back, and quickly progressed his rise as a high school athlete, basketball prodigy -college ball, Oxford varsity, failing rookie with the Knicks, a star and a two-time champion. And then a rookie senator from New Jersey, a three-term senator from New Jersey, and, in 2000, a presidential candidate who ran in a primary against Al Gore, after which he became an investment banker – well , “my father’s banker’s son.” And, now, perform in a solo piece.

There was anecdote after anecdote about the life of a basketball star. The time he went to see a Russian teacher at Princeton before facing the Russians in the 1964 Olympics and learned some Russian phrases, which he used to scare the Russians off in the gold medal game . How he first felt in the Knicks locker room because he was making more money than anyone else in the league, for reasons that seemed to be tied to him being white. How fans booed him on the pitch that year, throwing coins at him.

In the Signature lobby a few days later, after the final performance, seventy-eight-year-old Bradley was tired but willing; he runs cool and had energy in reserve. He said the idea for the show started after a reception at Princeton, to which he donated his papers in 2017. The university library had compiled an oral history about him, speaking to more than a hundred people. About seventy showed up at the reception. “I prepared a speech where I mentioned each person,” he said.

His friend Manny Azenberg, a theater producer, was present. “Fifty-year-old friend Manny never gave me a compliment,” Bradley said. “But after my speech he came over and said, ‘That sounds like Hal Holbrook. Why don’t you prepare something? And then I just started doing it. Bradley continued, “I would drive around the country to revise it. I would go to Salt Lake or Chicago, or Austin, Texas, or Marin County, to those little theaters. As part of his research, he said, he looked at the work of Holbrook, Billy Crystal and Spalding Gray. Gray always performed his monologues with an open script in front of him, but Bradley memorized his.

“Discipline is discipline,” he said. “You need discipline to hit twenty-five in a row. And you need discipline to memorize something. There’s probably been three to five days in the last eighteen months that I haven’t did this show, or a version of it. After the start of covid, he repeated during long walks in Central Park.

When he was on the road with “Rolling Along”, he would ask the audience for notes after each performance: “A guy in Salt Lake said, ‘You know, senator, this is interesting, but people want guts out of Put even more guts on the floor.” This could be seen as a valid criticism of Bradley’s behavior as a senator, and especially as a presidential candidate. But his talent is perhaps for consistency and a sense of proportion, to play in space. Even in a one-man show, he thought about teamwork. “The key is to find the balance between frankness and excess”, he said. he said, “You want to say enough but leave enough room for people’s imaginations.” ♦

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Faster Than Sound: A Year’s Headlines in Limbo: A Flurry of Industry Activity in an Intermittent Reopening Scene – Music https://acotonline.org/faster-than-sound-a-years-headlines-in-limbo-a-flurry-of-industry-activity-in-an-intermittent-reopening-scene-music/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 22:46:01 +0000 https://acotonline.org/faster-than-sound-a-years-headlines-in-limbo-a-flurry-of-industry-activity-in-an-intermittent-reopening-scene-music/ [ad_1] Gary Clark Jr. at the Moody Amphitheater in Waterloo Park in August (Photo by David Brendan Hall) Austin’s music has spent much of the year in limbo, and here we are again – holding our breath as a handful of sets and events cancel each other out because of Omicron. Rather than being defined […]]]>


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Gary Clark Jr. at the Moody Amphitheater in Waterloo Park in August (Photo by David Brendan Hall)

Austin’s music has spent much of the year in limbo, and here we are again – holding our breath as a handful of sets and events cancel each other out because of Omicron. Rather than being defined by an album or show, the local music headlines of 2021 crawl to the beat of national events.

When COVID raged, concerts were canceled, a tedious continuum, over and over again. When an unprecedented frost hit Texas in February, musicians and production workers distributed essential supplies. In April, as vaccines became available, an advocacy group Austin Texas Musicians musicians dosed at Pershing while Austin Musicians’ Health Alliance vaccinated limbs inside Emo’s.

Just in time for the fall of a largely maskless live touring economy to return, many big clubs have struck a ceasefire with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission under sliding protocol: concerts require recent negative COVID-19 tests in all areas and accept proof of vaccination as an alternative, always mentioning the cards in second position in the infographic.

The year of limbo conformed to a quote provided by ACL Live at the Moody Theater General manager Colleen Fischer in March, speaking of rescheduled tours: “It’s a moving target, unfortunately. We do our best to navigate it. We continue to move shows. We continue to book shows. “

Former Music Lab location in Saint-Elme (Photo by John Anderson)

Lost musical spaces

Lost music venues of the year include the BARN on Brodie Lane, the Parish, Dry Creek Café and Boat Dock, and Hazelnut amphitheater (whose owners plan to open a new Round Rock concept). Otherwise, 2021 also closed Groover’s Paradise Record Store, the hi-fi paradise Sound gallery, and Music labthe final location of St. Elmo. An indicator of Elon muskthe growing presence of in Austin, this latest beloved music incubator has become a You’re here showroom and service center.

Asked about the viability of operating a rehearsal space, the secretary of the Music Lab Joe cabela said to the Chronicle: “I think it would be difficult within the city limits. The cost of construction and the market rents make it difficult.”

The parish abruptly closed in October after the owner Matt reppert changed the locks and barricaded the windows without warning, according to a lawsuit filed by the owners of the premises. Seeking more than a million dollars in damages, the lawsuit alleged that the owner “had instigated a plot to requisition the business”. By the lake, Dry Creek Cafe threw one last Halloween party after its longtime owner Jay “Buddy” Reynolds sold the 68-year-old dive bar, despite fan rallying.

Inside the Concourse project in September (Photo by John Anderson)

An influx of openings

With the re-emergence of live music, an influx of new venues has made debuts delayed by the pandemic. The cavernous Competition project started booking big names in dance and electronics near the airport in June. Public green space during the day and a room for 5,000 people at night, Waterloo Park‘s Moody Amphitheater started hosting major tours in August, working with promoters C3 presents.

In other opening updates, Long-term salon established a second location at 1910 E. Cesar Chavez, formerly Stay Gold. Captain Quackenbush’s Cafe opened a 100-seat venue in the former South Austin site house Strange drink. Dance club with murals Outer Heaven nightclub occupies 1808 E. 12th, which once housed dozen street and Club 1808.

Right next to Burnet, North Austin stop Love wheel discs open in April under the ownership of Mike Nicolai, known as the longtime sound engineer at Hole in the wall. The breweries also provided top-notch outdoor stages, including increased bookings to Central machinery works and Meanwhile the brewing.

Astromonde impacts

ScorePlus, an Austin-based production and promotion company owned by Living country, has come under scrutiny following the Astromonde Festival tragedy in Houston. Considered one of the deadliest concerts in US history, the event left 10 people dead and dozens injured. A state task force headed by Texas Bureau of Music Director Anthony brendon – including safety experts, police and fire officials, state agencies like TABC, and unspecified leaders in the music industry – began meeting to produce a report on the safety of concerts.

The virtual convention avenue designed for SXSW Online

Who owns Austin Industry?

Following a virtual edition of the flagship festival in March, South by South-West announced a major new investor in April. Owners of Rolling stone, Billboard, Variety, and more, media umbrella P-MRC took a 50% stake in the Austin company. The partnership bolstered finances while the CEO of SXSW Roland swenson called “an incredibly difficult time for small businesses, including SXSW”.

Austin’s Keeled scales in partnership with the important Illinois footprint Polyvinyl in May, opening of a joint local office. By purchasing a 25% stake in the local brand, Polyvinyl takes care of direct fulfillment of consumer orders, while Keeled Scales retains creative control. And in June, members of the concert promotion team behind Margin Walker and Transmission events launched a new events company Resonate present below Graham williams‘ ownership.

The places have also changed hands: Ryman Hospitality Properties, owners of Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium and the Grand Olé Opry, renewed its plans to acquire the flagship Austin site ACL Live at the Moody Theater. Spider House Ballroom renamed just “The ballroom“under a new owner by Chris Boulanger, owner of from Arlo herbal restaurants.

The end of a 10-year management contract between KUT / KUTX and UT-Austin leads to the dismissal of Cafe Cactus director Matt Muñoz and executive assistant Amy Chamblesse. The venue has been reduced to anecdotes, open mics, and less than a dozen artists booked this fall semester, mostly curated by a group of students Events + Entertainment.

Funding of local and federal sites

After lobbying throughout 2020, local and federal site relief has been rolled out this year. The city of Austin created Preservation of live music venues The fund has allocated $ 5 million to local concert halls as part of COVID-19 relief efforts. As part of the emergency funding for Phase 1, 74 local sites received upfront payments of $ 20,000, quickly distributed by the city’s partner, the Long center. In phase 2 of the program, 28 clubs received larger ongoing grants.

Many Austin site owners hoped the local fund would complement larger support from the Subsidy for shutter room operators – also known as Save our steps. After many delays, the Small business management awarded more than $ 11.3 billion over the summer, awarding more than $ 130 million to 108 Austin-based live music and performing arts entities. According to data released in October, the top five amounts went to UT-Austin’s Texas Performing Arts, Messina Tourism Group, South by South-West, Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar, and Alamo Drafthouse Lakeline.

Chencho Flores (Photo by John Anderson)

In memory

Twelve months have claimed many essential figures in Austin’s music. Alphabetically:

Nanci Griffith on the cover of The Chronicle of Austin in 2005

Austin Music Network Programmer Benjamin kent, former local spouse Chencho Flores, masterful blues guitarist Denny freemanesteemed folk and country songwriter Nanci griffithpoignant punk musician Brandon hamiltongenerous ABGB co-founder Mark Jensen, old Small Longhorn Lounge owner Ginny Kalmbach, renowned jazz drummer Scott Laningham, influential bassist Yoggie Musgrove, sound engineer who shapes the industry Rupert neve, promoter of powerful concerts /Backyard and Austin Music Room owner Tim o’connor, super harmonica Paul Oscher, psychedelic visionary /Janis Joplin group mate Powell St. John, boogie-woogie pianist Gene Taylor, pioneering music journalist Ed ward, and to top it all Broken spoke patriarch Jacques Blanc.

The last time I spoke with White, in July 2020, he reflected on the pandemic, “I don’t want this damn virus to kill live music, whether it’s country or rock or blues or whatever. It’s just a fucking shame … You can listen on TV or radio, but nothing beats being there with live music and letting the music take you where it takes you. can’t be the capital of live music if you don’t have music. It makes sense to me! “

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