artistic director – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Thu, 17 Mar 2022 19:44:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png artistic director – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 Music Theater Works’ ‘La Cage aux Folles’ revival meets actors’ long-held ambitions https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-la-cage-aux-folles-revival-meets-actors-long-held-ambitions/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 12:05:28 +0000 https://acotonline.org/music-theater-works-la-cage-aux-folles-revival-meets-actors-long-held-ambitions/ You could say that by performing in Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles”, Ginger Minj and Dane Strange are making up for missed opportunities. Minj, who plays Albin, an aging drag performer who stars in her husband’s nightclub revue, was slated to play the role years ago in a community theater production […]]]>

You could say that by performing in Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles”, Ginger Minj and Dane Strange are making up for missed opportunities.

Minj, who plays Albin, an aging drag performer who stars in her husband’s nightclub revue, was slated to play the role years ago in a community theater production in Florida. That production was canceled after city officials balked at doing a show about a gay family, said Minj, who was disappointed but admitted that at 18 the role wasn’t suitable.

It’s a perfect fit now.

“At 37, I truly understand history as being fiercely devoted to my family and fiercely devoted to the art of drag,” said the two-time ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race’ finalist.

During his senior year at college, Strange was set to play Jacob, George, and Albin’s butler, but things didn’t work out.


Dane Strange plays Jacob, the butler, in Music Theater Works’ “La Cage aux Folles”.

After 10 years, the Palatine resident – a veteran of Theater Nebula and Music on Stage – finally has the opportunity to play the part.

The Music Theater Works production marks the professional theater debut of the New Jersey native, who began his career at age 7 on the Disney Channel educational series “Out of the Box.” Commercials and TV spots followed. But the moment he began studying theater arts at Somerset County Vocational and Technical High School, Strange decided his place was on stage.

Like Strange, Minj has been performing since childhood. At six months, she played a “Fiddler on the Roof” baby. She grew up doing community theater.


        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

“I liked theater better, but I was more suited to musicals,” said Minj, a veteran of Chicago’s famed Baton Show Lounge, which has featured drag performers for more than 50 years.

“La Cage aux Folles”, which premiered in 1984 – the year Minj was born – was a big part of her life and holds a special place in her heart.



Jason Richards, left, plays Georges and Ginger Minj plays his partner, Albin, in the revival of Music Theater Works "La Cage aux Folles," through April 3 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts.

Jason Richards, left, plays Georges and Ginger Minj plays his partner, Albin, in Music Theater Works’ revival of ‘La Cage aux Folles’, through April 3 at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts.
– Courtesy of Trevor Beaty

Regardless of the audience’s reaction, the tuner “sparks a conversation and gets things done,” she said, adding, “I’ve always thought that art and artists are the ones who really drive change. in the world”.

Despite her fondness for the Jerry Herman-Harvey Fierstein musical, Minj turned down repeated requests to play Albin because she felt theaters did not understand the role of pick-up in the show. But after talking to Music Theater Works artistic director and producer Kyle A. Dougan, she signed on.

“He (Dougan) said the story was about family,” said Minj, who then realized that “we’re coming to this from the same place.”

“I’ve never seen a successful production like this,” Minj said. “It tells the story in a new way while keeping everything you love about the original.”



The revival of Music Theater Works from "La Cage aux Folles" co stars "RuPaul's Drag Race" finalist Ginger Minj.

Music Theater Works’ revival of “La Cage aux Folles” features “RuPaul’s Drag Race” runner-up Ginger Minj.
– Courtesy of Trevor Beaty

Additionally, the musical can be a way to introduce the LGBTQ+ community to people who may not know it, Minj said, showing them “that we’re as much a family as they are with our quirks, with our idiosyncrasies, with our drama and with our love… We are the same.”

For Strange, “La Cage aux Folles” is about acceptance: self-acceptance and acceptance of others. And while things have improved for members of the LGBTQ+ community, the battles remain.

“I had my own personal struggles as a black, gay man,” said Strange, who found Jacob’s role more difficult than he expected until he concluded that he had to accept himself.

“I am what I am,” said Strange, referring to the show’s iconic anthem. “We are what we are.”

• • •

“The Crazy Cage”

When: 8 p.m. Friday; 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday; 1 p.m. Wednesday, until April 3

Where: Music Theater Works at the North Shore Center for the Performing Arts, 9501 Skokie Blvd., Skokie, (847) 673-6300 or musictheaterworks.com

Tickets: $19.50 to $106

COVID-19 precautions: Proof of vaccination or negative COVID-19 test and masks required

]]> A 20th Anniversary Reimagining – KC STUDIO https://acotonline.org/a-20th-anniversary-reimagining-kc-studio/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/a-20th-anniversary-reimagining-kc-studio/ Performers in the Ruby Room at the Music Theater Heritage, left to right: Ron Lackey, Courtney Germany, Misha Roberts, Nate McClendon, Ayana Tribitt, Kadesh Flow, Douglass Walker and Darrell Mayberry. (photo by Jim Barcus) The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm. With a revised name and expanded focus, […]]]>

Performers in the Ruby Room at the Music Theater Heritage, left to right: Ron Lackey, Courtney Germany, Misha Roberts, Nate McClendon, Ayana Tribitt, Kadesh Flow, Douglass Walker and Darrell Mayberry. (photo by Jim Barcus)


The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm.

With a revised name and expanded focus, the Kansas City theater celebrates its 20th anniversary with a full slate of productions and a new Ruby Room performance space

A good story worth repeating: the company now known as Music Theater Heritage began 20 years ago with a live radio broadcast from a Belger Cartage loading dock in downtown city ​​of Kansas City.

Conceived as a way to promote founder George Harter’s longtime radio show, “A Night on the Town,” the nonprofit theater company grew and established itself as a place to enjoy music from classic Broadway shows. For several years the shows were staged as concerts which included theatrical elements, but were not quite full productions. MTH has withstood the COVID-19 pandemic through perseverance and innovation and has now prepared a season to mark two decades of existence.

“You know, this year is unlike any other for a number of reasons,” said Tim Scott, the company’s executive art director. “First of all, it’s our 20th anniversary. But, of course, you’re also trying to plan for the unexpected because of the coronavirus. »

Like any proud art director, Scott is not above indulging in justified bragging. In a press release late last year, he highlighted the company’s success in battling the pandemic. Let the record show: MTH was the first professional theater to produce a live show in 2021 with its rooftop production of ‘Music of the Night’. Since April last year, MTH has produced 14 live productions and served nearly 500 students through educational initiatives; in 2021, nearly 40,000 spectators saw performances at the Crown Center; and the company started the year with three employees but now has nearly 30.

In addition to presenting a few shows on the roof of the Crown Center, the company has also turned to concerts made for video and made available to the public virtually. Scott, who shot and edited the performances, delivered high-quality reviews that wouldn’t have looked out of place on public television.

In all, the company made 14 live productions in 2021.

“We did ‘Hair’ and ‘Camelot’ through the Delta variation,” Scott said. “With ‘Hair’, half the singers wore masks.”

The new season includes musical theater classics, revisited with creative departures from the norm.

Tim Scott, Executive Artistic Director, Music Theater Heritage (photo by Sophia Napoli)

The season:

“STEVIE: signed, sealed, delivered” is scheduled from March 24 to April 10. The production celebrates the music of Stevie Wonder and will be staged in collaboration with 2 Proud 2 Beg, bandleader Ron Lackey’s Motown ensemble.

“Song and Dance” Andrew Lloyd Webber’s rarely produced two-act musical will run May 12-29. Half of the show is told in song, the other half in dance. The arrangements involve a rock band and a cellist. Webber wrote the dance portion of the show for his brother, cellist Julian Webber. It will be a regional first.

“Titanic,” June 16-July 3. The Broadway production of this show, with words and music by Maury Yeston and an accompanying book on the musical by Peter Stone, was a massive physical production with a huge cast and full orchestra. The MTH version of necessity takes a different route with a twist: the music will be performed by a small ensemble on instruments played by musicians on the doomed Titanic – a string quartet and a grand piano.

“Cabaret,” August 11-28. Kander and Ebb’s classic about decadent Berlin and the rise of Nazism before World War II will be staged with cabaret tables and stools arranged closer to the stage than the usual audience seats. “Those seated in this area will have a slightly more immersive experience than those seated in the theater seats,” Scott said.

“Man of La Mancha”, October 6-23. This 1965 musical by composer Mitch Leigh, playwright Dale Wasserman and lyricist Joe Darion is adapted from the classic 17th-century novel “Don Quixote.” Scott said the show will be produced in conjunction with the Kansas City-based Ensemble Ibérica, which performs music from Spain and Portugal. The idea, Scott said, was to adapt the score in a way that gave it a bit more of an authentic Spanish feel.

“A Spectacular Christmas Spectacular”, an original revue and annual tradition at MTH, December 8-23.

“Titanic” and “Cabaret” will be performed at the Grand Theater (formerly the American Heartland Theater). Other productions will be in the traditional MTH space on the third floor of the Crown Center.

Additionally, MTH will be offering what they bill as the Ruby Room Series in a revamped performance space just off the main lobby. The shows focus on artists who made significant contributions to American culture, including Sonny & Cher and other 1960s pop singers: jazz artists Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington and Louis Prima; Nina Simone, Sam Cook and Otis Redding; the Beatles; beat generation writers Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac as well as bebop and cool jazz artists; and songwriters Johnny Mercer and Harold Arlen.

Although a casual observer might not notice it, the name of the theater company is in its third incarnation. What started life as Musical Theater Heritage became simply MTH. From now on, “musical” has been replaced by simply “music” – Music Theater Heritage. It’s a small change but it involves a broader definition of music.

From radio roots to live performance

George Harter said he formed Musical Theater Heritage primarily to fund his radio show, which originally aired for several years on KXTR and later on Kansas Public Radio. The show eventually aired on a number of stations across the country. He said he and tenor Nathan Granner had approached backers to underwrite the show.

“I formed MTH just to fund the radio show,” Harter said. “When I shopped around for funding, local funders weren’t particularly interested in funding something out of town. So Nathan and I decided we needed a local mission and started a (live) series.

At Belger, the band performed a series of shows – “Carousel” (which marked Tim Scott’s first appearance on an MTH show), “On the Town”, “Brigadoon”, “Guys and Dolls” and “The Fantasticks “, including the others. Eventually, Belger needed the loading dock space to prepare his Belger Arts Center, so Harter began looking for other locations.

Before long, MTH was performing live shows in what was then called the Off Center Theater (a former movie multiplex) on the third floor of the Crown Center. Eventually, Harter said, MTH became the most frequent user of the space, leading Crown Center to offer them a contract as a full-time tenant.

“They gave us a great offer on the rent,” Harter said. Many concert productions have been directed by Sarah Crawford, and some of them have been particularly memorable – an effective all-female direction of “1776” and an engaged performance of “Big River”, the show based on “The Adventures of Huckleberry” by Mark Twain. Finnish.”

Chad Gerlt joined the team early on. He had returned from Los Angeles, where he had moved with the idea of ​​becoming a voice-over artist. “I wanted to do cartoons and video games,” he said. But he got by as a singing waiter at a Macaroni Grill in
Thousand Oaks.

“I missed my family and wanted to buy a house,” Gerlt said. “I could never have bought a house in LA”

Gerlt retired from MTH a few months ago to pursue a career in real estate. But he was proud to be part of the team that grew viewership and made MTH a success. From time to time, Gerlt performed on stage.

“COVID has obviously changed a lot of things,” Gerlt said. “It didn’t kill us, and I promise you it won’t kill us. But it changed the dynamic there.

The radio show was retired in 2015. The rise of online streaming services – Spotify etc. al – made all the music Harter had released over the years instantly available. A few stations across the country continued to air reruns of the show.

These days, Harter directs his energies to the theatrical trips he organizes for fans and bands to travel to New York and see Broadway shows.

But the theater’s original mission, he said, was a direct result of the radio show.

“It was about appreciating American musical theatre,” he said. “People realized that rock-and-roll and jazz were uniquely American art forms, but no one thought of the American songbook and musical theater as an original American art form.”

For more information on the Music Theater Heritage season, visit www.mthkc.org.

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Paris concert hall cancels Russian star conductor https://acotonline.org/paris-concert-hall-cancels-russian-star-conductor/ Mon, 28 Feb 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/paris-concert-hall-cancels-russian-star-conductor/ Published on: 02/28/2022 – 18:04 Paris (AFP)- The prestigious Philharmonie de Paris concert hall on Monday became the latest arts institution to ban Russian conductor Valery Gergiev over his close ties to President Vladimir Putin. The concert hall said in a statement that it was revising its program for the coming months “in solidarity with […]]]>

Published on:

Paris (AFP)- The prestigious Philharmonie de Paris concert hall on Monday became the latest arts institution to ban Russian conductor Valery Gergiev over his close ties to President Vladimir Putin.

The concert hall said in a statement that it was revising its program for the coming months “in solidarity with the Ukrainian people” following Russia’s invasion of the pro-Western country.

He said he canceled two concerts in April by Gergiev and the orchestra of the Mariinsky Theater in Saint Petersburg, of which he is the conductor and artistic director.

Gergiev, known to have warm ties to the Kremlin, has yet to issue a statement on the invasion.

Last week, authorities in the German city of Munich told him he risked losing his role as conductor of the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra if he did not condemn the war.

Gergiev was released on Sunday by his agent in Germany, Marcus Felsner.

The agency could no longer represent anyone “who is unwilling, or unable, to publicly end its longstanding support for a regime that has come to commit such crimes,” Felsner said in a statement.

Gergiev was also told last week that he would be fired from performances of Tchaikovsky’s opera “The Queen of Spades” at Milan’s Teatro alla Scala if he did not publicly denounce the war in Ukraine.

Milan mayor and La Scala president Giuseppe Sala said on Monday that Gergiev had “not responded”.

Asked about an upcoming performance on March 5, he replied: “I don’t think he will be there, I think we can rule him out at this stage.”

Gergiev was also barred from concerts by the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra at Carnegie Hall in New York.

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Germany’s renowned concert hall celebrates the transformative impact of its fifth anniversary https://acotonline.org/germanys-renowned-concert-hall-celebrates-the-transformative-impact-of-its-fifth-anniversary/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/germanys-renowned-concert-hall-celebrates-the-transformative-impact-of-its-fifth-anniversary/ Tomorrow (Tuesday 11 January 2022) marks the 5th anniversary of the Elbphilharmonie, Hamburg’s world-renowned concert hall designed by Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron. The occasion will be celebrated with a gala concert as part of a nine-day anniversary festival. Over the past five years, the Elbphilharmonie has exceeded all expectations by attracting 3.3 […]]]>

Tomorrow (Tuesday 11 January 2022) marks the 5th anniversary of the Elbphilharmonie, Hamburg’s world-renowned concert hall designed by Swiss architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron. The occasion will be celebrated with a gala concert as part of a nine-day anniversary festival. Over the past five years, the Elbphilharmonie has exceeded all expectations by attracting 3.3 million spectators and 14.5 million visitors to its Plaza viewing platform, transforming the image of a whole city. Hamburg’s attendance numbers have tripled since 2017, earning Germany’s second-largest city a global reputation as a leading city for culture and travel destinations.

Since its opening in 2017 by former German Chancellor Angela Merkel and Hamburg Mayor Olaf Scholz, the Elbphilharmonie has hosted many of the world’s top orchestras alongside countless greats of classical music and other genres in more of 2,900 concerts – attracting 3.3 million spectators. With a combined annual audience figure of 1.25 million between the Elbphilharmonie and the Laeiszhalle, concert audiences in the city of Hamburg have tripled over the past five years. The Elbphilharmonie’s viewing platform, the Plaza, offering 360-degree panoramic views of Hamburg and the Elbe, has additionally attracted 14.5 million visitors to date, surpassing many top tourist destinations. Germany’s favorites, including Neuschwanstein Castle in Bavaria.

Five years of Elbphilharmonie Hamburg also represent the emergence of Hamburg’s new identity as a city of culture. The Elbphilharmonie fulfills its destiny as a beacon that illuminates the entire cultural landscape of the city comprising more than 300 cultural institutions, including some sixty museums and 45 theatres. The share of international visitors to Hamburg’s largest museum, the Hamburger Kunsthalle, doubled between 2016 and 2019. According to an official cultural tourism survey from October 2019, overnight stays in Hamburg increased by more than 15% between January 2017 and end of 2019. For 22% of German tourists spending the night in Hamburg for the first time, the main purpose of the trip was to attend an event at the Elbphilharmonie or to visit the viewing platform Square.

Hamburg’s Minister of Culture and Media, Dr. Carsten Brosda, said: “Hamburg has always been a great cultural city with a very long tradition. Thanks to the Elbphilharmonie with its inspiring architecture and its varied and high-quality programme, Hamburg’s image as a city of art and culture has been considerably strengthened both nationally and internationally.

Christoph Lieben-Seutter, General and Artistic Director of the Elbphilharmonie and the Laeiszhalle Hamburg, said: “I am absolutely delighted that after a long period of uncertainty, the 5th anniversary concerts can indeed take place with only a few reductions. and in front of a full house. For me and my team, the coming week will be an opportunity to reflect on the exciting times we have shared since opening and to celebrate with our many companions, friends and supporters that the Philharmonie de the Elbe more than lived up to the high expectations that were placed on it.’

For the Elbphilharmonie’s 5th anniversary gala concert (January 11, 2022), the resident orchestra NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchestra and its principal conductor Alan Gilbert will perform an entirely contemporary program by John Adams, Esa-Pekka Salonen as well as the Piano Concerto by Thomas Adès with the dedicate work Kirill Gerstein. The concert will be streamed live and available for free viewing to global audiences at: www.elbphilharmonie.de The gala concert is at the heart of a nine-day anniversary festival (January 9-17, 2022) that reflects the caliber and diversity of the Elbphilharmonie program with a line-up including Sir Simon Rattle, Daniel Barenboim, Jordi Savall, Charles Lloyd, John Scofield: https://www.elbphilharmonie.de/en/5-years-elbphilharmonie.

In cooperation with the Museum of Arts and Crafts Hamburg (MK&G), the Elbphilharmonie has commissioned the internationally renowned Dutch artist duo DRIFT to create an extraordinary light work for the 5th anniversary of the Elbphilharmonie . Entitled “Breaking Waves,” hundreds of illuminated drones flying over the Elbe will be choreographed to Thomas Adès’ Piano Concerto, playfully bringing the concert hall‘s facade to life. ‘Breaking Waves’ will be performed from April 28 to May 1, 2022, kicking off the Hamburg International Music Festival 2022. The light artwork complements MK&G’s major exhibition, “DRIFT: Moments of Connection (January 7 – May 8, 2022), with three unique kinetic sculptures that transform a 350 square meter gallery into a sensual experience.

Read more at https://www.mkg-hamburg.de/en/exhibitions/current/drift-moments-of-connection.html

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See Smash Broadway Hit ‘HADESTOWN’ at Bass Concert Hall, January 11-16, 2022 https://acotonline.org/see-smash-broadway-hit-hadestown-at-bass-concert-hall-january-11-16-2022/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 18:11:33 +0000 https://acotonline.org/see-smash-broadway-hit-hadestown-at-bass-concert-hall-january-11-16-2022/ [ad_1] ‘HADESTOWN’, winner of eight Tony Awards 2019® including Best New Musical and the 2020 Grammy® Award for Best Album in Musical Theater, debuted in Austin as part of Texas Performing Arts’ 2021-22 Broadway season in Austin. “HADESTOWN” will play Bass Concert Hall January 11-16, 2022. “HADESTOWN” is the most honored show of the 2018-19 […]]]>


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‘HADESTOWN’, winner of eight Tony Awards 2019® including Best New Musical and the 2020 Grammy® Award for Best Album in Musical Theater, debuted in Austin as part of Texas Performing Arts’ 2021-22 Broadway season in Austin. “HADESTOWN” will play Bass Concert Hall January 11-16, 2022.

“HADESTOWN” is the most honored show of the 2018-19 season on Broadway. In addition to the show’s eight Tony Awards®, he received four Drama Desk Awards, six Outer Critics Circle Awards, including Outstanding New Broadway Musical, and the Drama League Award for Outstanding Production of a Musical.

The acclaimed new musical is from acclaimed singer-songwriter and Tony Award® winner Anais mitchell and developed with an innovative director and Tony Award® winner Rachel Chavkin. “HADESTOWN” marks the first time in more than a decade that a woman has been the solo writer of a musical: writing the music, the lyrics and the book, and it’s the fourth time in history of Broadway that a woman accomplishes this creative feat.

ON:

Producers Mara isaacs, Dale franzen, Hunter Arnold, and Tom kirdahy jointly said, “Throughout its development, ‘HADESTOWN’ has been deeply influenced by audiences around the world. We are delighted and honored to now share this beautiful story of hope, faith and rebirth – written and performed by two incredibly talented women and hosted by a diverse company of performers – with audiences across North America.

The show originated Mitchell’s independent theater project which toured Vermont, which she then turned into an acclaimed album. With his artistic collaborator Chavkin, “HADESTOWN” was transformed into a new genre-defying musical that mixes modern American folk music with New Orleans-inspired jazz to reinvent an ancient tale.

The North American Touring Production of “HADESTOWN” Drama Desk Award stars® candidate Nicolas barasch like Orpheus, Morgan Siobhan Green as Eurydice, Tony Award® winner Levi Kreis like Hermès, Kimberly marable as Perséphone, and Olivier Award® candidate Kevin Morrow like Hades.

The Fates are played by Belén Moyano, Bex Odorisio, and Shea Rennes. Characteristics of the workers’ choir Lindsey Hailes, Chibueze Ihuoma, Will mann, Sydney Parra, and Jamari johnson williams. Swings for touring production include Kimberly Emmanuel, Alex lugo, Eddie Noel Rodriguez, and Nathan Salstone.

After two intertwined love stories – that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone – “HADESTOWN” invites the public on a hellish journey into the underworld and vice versa. Mitchell’s haunting melodies and Chavkin’s poetic imagination pit industry against nature, doubt against faith, and fear against love. Performed by a dynamic ensemble of actors, dancers and singers, “HADESTOWN” offers a deeply resonant and hopeful theatrical experience.

The Grammy® winner “HADESTOWN” The original Broadway Cast recording is now available on Hadestown.com/music. The album is produced by David Lai, Sickafoose and Mitchell on Sing It Again Records.

TICKETS:

Starting at $ 35. Tickets are available on texasperformingarts.org and BroadwayinAustin.com, by phone at (512) 477-1444, or at the Texas Performing Arts box office at Bass Concert Hall. For groups of 10 or more, call (877) 275-3804 or email Austin.groups@broadwayacrossamerica.com

BIOGRAPHIES:

ANAÏS MITCHELL (Music, lyrics and book) is a Tony and Grammy Award-winning singer-songwriter whose recordings include the original studio album by Hadestown (2010), Young man in america (2012), Bonny Cavalier Light (2019, as Bonny Light Horseman) and Anais mitchell (2022). She was named to the TIME100 list of the world’s most influential people in 2020 and her first book Working on a song – Hadestown lyrics was published by Plume / Penguin the same year. She is featured on shows around the world and her music is regularly featured on “Best-Of” lists, including NPR, The Guardian and The Wall Street Journal. Hadestown is Anaïs’s first musical.

RACHEL CHAVKIN (Director) is a Tony Award-winning director, screenwriter and artistic director of the Brooklyn-based TEAM collective. Hadestown (NYTW, National Theater, London) was one of his greatest joys. Tony and Lortel nominations and Drama Desk Award for Dave Malloy Natasha, Pierre and the great comet of 1812 (Broadway, Ars Nova, ART). London: Mission drift (National Theater), American clock (Old Vic). Select New York and regional: Marco Ramirez’s The royal (LCT; Obie Award, Drama Desk and Lortel nominations), Malloy’s Preludes (LCT3), Bess Wohl’s Small mouth sounds (Ars Nova and national tour), those of Carson Kreitzer and Matt Gould Lempicka (Williamstown Theater Festival), The Royal family (Guthrie Theater) and multiple collaborations with Taylor Mac. His first movie, Call me back, was an official selection of the Venice and Beverly Hills Festivals. 2017 Smithsonian Award for Ingenuity. Proud NYTW Usual suspect and SDC member.

DAVID NEUMANN (Choreographer). Movie: I’m a legend, Marriage story (Noé Baumbach). Choreography: an octoron and Futurity (Representative of Soho); Antipodes (Signature Theater); Underground railroad game (Ars Nova); Hagoromo and Homepage (BAM); The Antipodes (Signature Theater). Collaborator and performer: Laurie Anderson, Big Dance Theater, Mikhail Baryshnikov, Doug Elkins. Director: The lesson of things (NYTW, BAM). Artistic Director, Advanced Beginner Group (PS122, NY Live Arts, The Kitchen, Symphony Space, Abrons Art Center, The Chocolate Factory, The Whitney, Walker Art Center, MASS MoCA). Recipient of the Obie Award 2020, the Chita Rivera Award 2019, three Bessie Awards for dance / performance, Tony nominated for Hadestown, nominated for the Lucille Lortel and Helen Hayes Prize.

HEALTH AND SECURITY:

Texas Performing Arts prioritizes the health and safety of its guests, performers and staff. Changes have been made to sites and protocols developed by University of Texas medical experts in accordance with state laws for public organizations implemented. Health and security plans include improved air circulation and filtration, increased lobby space, contactless ticketing and transactions, increased cleaning and hand sanitizing stations at all sites. Masks are strongly recommended indoors regardless of vaccination status.

Texas Performing Arts is the Performing Arts Presentation Program at the University of Texas at Austin and operates campus venues including the Bass Concert Hall and the McCullough Theater. It is home to the Broadway in Austin series, a curated performing arts program and a host of comedy events and concerts. In calendar year 2019, Bass Concert Hall had the most tickets sold of any theater in Austin, was No. 2 in the state of Texas and No. 22 in the world, according to the publication of the Pollstar industry. Following a nationwide search, Tony Award-winning producer Bob Bursey was named executive director in January 2020.

Broadway Across America (BAA) is part of the John Gore Organization family of companies, which includes Broadway.com, The Broadway Channel, BroadwayBox.com and Group Sales Box Office. Led by 15-time Tony-winner theater producer John Gore (owner and CEO), BAA is the leading presenter of first-class touring productions in North America, operating in 45 markets with over 400,000 subscribers. Presentations include Disney’s The Lion King, Bad, The Book of Mormon, The Phantom of the Opera and Hamilton. Current and past productions include Is not too proud, Beautiful Cats, Chicago, Dear Evan Hansen, Bad girls, Red Mill! and Kill a mockingbird. For more information, please visit BroadwayAcrossAmerica.com and Broadway.com. Broadway Across America provides production services for Texas Performing Arts. Sales tax exempt in accordance with Section 151.3101 (a) (3) of the Texas Tax Code.

LEARN MORE:

www.hadestown.com/tour

www.facebook.com/hadestownofficial

www.twitter.com/hadestown

www.instagram.com/hadestown


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From a Burger King to a concert hall, with the help of Frank Gehry https://acotonline.org/from-a-burger-king-to-a-concert-hall-with-the-help-of-frank-gehry/ Mon, 27 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/from-a-burger-king-to-a-concert-hall-with-the-help-of-frank-gehry/ INGLEWOOD, Calif. – 17-year-old high school student Noemi Guzman usually has to find a spot to practice the violin – the instrument she calls “literally, the love of my life.” But the other Saturday morning, Guzman joined a string ensemble that practiced here on a stage almost as grand and acoustic as the place where […]]]>

INGLEWOOD, Calif. – 17-year-old high school student Noemi Guzman usually has to find a spot to practice the violin – the instrument she calls “literally, the love of my life.” But the other Saturday morning, Guzman joined a string ensemble that practiced here on a stage almost as grand and acoustic as the place where she dreams of performing one day: the Walt Disney Concert Hall, home of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

“It’s beautiful,” Guzman said during a break from a workout at the Judith and Thomas L. Beckmen YOLA Center, his voice muffled by a mask. “To have a space you can call your own. This is our space. It is created for us.

Inglewood, a working-class town three miles from Los Angeles Airport that was once plagued by crime and poverty, is in the midst of a far-reaching economic transformation, largely focused on sports: SoFi Stadium in 70,000 seater, which opened here last year, now the home of the Rams and Chargers, will be the site of the Super Bowl in February and will be used for the 2028 Summer Olympics. Construction is underway on an arena 18,000 seats for the Los Angeles Clippers, the basketball team.

But the transformation of Inglewood, historically one of the largest black communities in that area, is also exemplified by the 25,000 square foot building where Guzman practiced the other morning. The building, which opened in October, is the first permanent home of the Youth Orchestra Los Angeles and is the result of a collaboration between two of the most prominent cultural figures in Los Angeles: Gustavo Dudamel, artistic director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, which oversees YOLA, and Frank Gehry, the architect who designed the Walt Disney Concert Hall.

“It was an old bank,” said Dudamel, a longtime friend of Gehry’s, a classical music lover who can often be spotted in the armchairs of the hall he designed. “Then it was a Burger King – yes, a Burger King! Frank saw the potential. What we have there is a stage the same size as Disney Hall.

The $23.5 million project is a high point for YOLA, the youth music education program that was founded here 15 years ago under Dudamel and which he calls the flagship achievement of his tenure. It hosts 1,500 students, ages 5 to 18, who come to study, practice, and play music on instruments provided by the Los Angeles Philharmonic. It was modeled after El Sistema, the music education program for young people in Venezuela where Dudamel studied the violin as a child.

And it’s one of the most striking examples of the efforts of the nation’s leading arts organizations to roll out youth education programs to communities, rather than concentrating them in inner cities or urban arts districts. . “You can’t just do it downtown,” said Karen Mack, executive director of LA Commons, a community arts organization. “If you really want him to have the impact possible with this program, you have to let the community know about it. It must be accessible. »

Gehry called this idea the “whole game”.

“It’s not the community that should go to Disney Hall,” he said, “it’s Disney Hall that comes to the community.”

For Inglewood, the new YOLA Center is a notable addition to what has been a transformative wave of stadium and arena construction, which has spurred a wave of commercial and residential development (and with it, concerns about subsequent gentrification). often this type of development). Until 2016, Inglewood was primarily known as the home of The Forum, the 45-year-old arena where the Lakers and Kings once played before moving to what was known as Staples Center in downtown Los Angeles. , and Hollywood Park Racetrack, which closed to make way for SoFi Stadium.

“We’ve never been known for cultural enrichment,” said James T. Butts Jr., Inglewood’s mayor. “That’s why it’s so important to us. What’s happening now is a rounding off of society and culture: we won’t be known just for sports and entertainment anymore.

Even before the Beckmen Center opened, YOLA could be a heady experience for a school-age student considering a career in music. Guzman, who joined the youth orchestra seven years ago, has performed bow to bow with members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic under Dudamel’s baton. YOLA musicians have joined the Philharmonic at Disney Hall, the Hollywood Bowl and on tour to places like Tokyo, Seoul and Mexico City.

Christine Kiva, 15, who started playing the cello at the age of 7, now studies with cellists from the Philharmonie. “It helped me develop my sound as a cellist and work on cello repertoire,” she said.

Inglewood is the fifth economically troubled neighborhood where the youth organization has set up an outpost. But in the first four locations, it shares space with other organizations, forced to fit in without full-fledged performance space or practice rooms. “We were running the project in spaces that weren’t specifically designed for music,” said Chad Smith, general manager of the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra.

Now the words “Judith and Thomas L. Beckmen YOLA Center,” named after the philanthropists and vineyard owners who donated the largest amount to the project, span the facade of the renovated building facing South La Avenue. Brea and the old city center. Dudamel has an office there. Members of the Los Angeles Philharmonic show up regularly to observe practices and work with students.

This building has many rooms for students to practice. There are 272 seats on benches in the main hall, which can be retracted into a wall, allowing the hall to be split in two so that two orchestras can practice at the same time. The acoustics were designed by Nagata Acoustics, who also designed the acoustics for Disney Hall.

The building was owned by Inglewood, who sold it to the Los Angeles Philharmonic. “When we first walked in, there was still the greasy smell of a Burger King,” said Elsje Kibler-Vermaas, vice president for learning at the Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra. Gehry, who had previously worked with Dudamel on projects – including designs for the 2012 opera “Don Giovanni” – agreed to take a look at the building, a former bank that opened in 1965.

He said when they brought him there he was struck by the low ceilings from when he was a bank.

“I said, ‘Is it possible to do an intervention?'” recalls Gehry who, even at 92, is involved in a series of design projects across Los Angeles.

By cutting a hole in his ceiling and installing a skylight, and cutting a hole in the floor to deepen the room, he was able to create a performance space with a 45-foot-high ceiling, close to what Disney Hall has . “Children will have a real experience playing in this kind of room,” he said.

It turned out to be a $2 million conversation; the total price, including the purchase of the building and its renovation, was increased from $21 million to $23.5 million to cover the additional cost of raising the roof, installing a well light and the lowering of the floor.

The building was busy the other day. Pupils had come for afternoon music instruction at elementary schools, mostly in Inglewood, and after the snacks – bananas, apples, granola bars – they rushed off for their music reading lessons , percussion and how to follow a conductor.

“Pay attention!” said Mario Raven, guiding his students through a singing and music reading lesson. “Let’s go – one, two, three!”

The brass were outside due to Covid-19 issues (it’s hard to play French horn while wearing a mask). As the planes flew overhead, they performed “High Hopes” from Panic! at the Disco, suggesting that a youth orchestra need not live by Brahms and Beethoven alone.

Students typically take 12 to 18 hours of instruction per week for 44 weeks per year. About a quarter of them end up majoring in music. Smith said this is reflected in the program’s broader aspirations. “Our goal was not to train the greatest musicians in the world,” he said. “Our goal was to provide music education to build students’ self-esteem through music.”

Dudamel said his experience as a boy in Venezuela was formative in bringing the program to Los Angeles. “I grew up in an orchestra where they called us, in the press, ‘the orchestra without a ceiling,'” he said in a Zoom interview from France, where he is now also musical director of the Paris Opera. “Because we had no place to rehearse. We have made a dream come true where young people have the best things they can have. A good room. Great teachers.

“Listen, this is no ordinary music school,” he added. “We don’t claim to be a conservatory. Maybe they won’t be musicians in the future. But our goal is for them to have music in their lives, because it brings beauty, it brings discipline through art.

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CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY arrives at Centennial Concert Hall June 2022 https://acotonline.org/charlie-and-the-chocolate-factory-arrives-at-centennial-concert-hall-june-2022/ Mon, 13 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/charlie-and-the-chocolate-factory-arrives-at-centennial-concert-hall-june-2022/ Showtime Productions Inc. has announced that Roald Dahl’s CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY will perform in Winnipeg at the Centennial Concert hall, June 7-12, 2022. CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY goes on sale Friday, December 17 at 10 a.m. Tickets will be available online at centennialconcerthall.com, by phone at 204.949.3999 or in person at the […]]]>

Showtime Productions Inc. has announced that Roald Dahl’s CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY will perform in Winnipeg at the Centennial Concert hall, June 7-12, 2022.

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY goes on sale Friday, December 17 at 10 a.m. Tickets will be available online at centennialconcerthall.com, by phone at 204.949.3999 or in person at the Centennial Concert Hall box office at 555 Main Street.

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY by Roald Dahl tells the story of Willy Wonka, world famous inventor of the Everlasting Gobstopper, who has just made an astonishing announcement. His marvelous and mysterious factory opens its doors… to a lucky few. This includes young Charlie Bucket, whose life definitely needs some sweetening. He and four other Golden Ticket winners will embark on a fascinating and life-changing journey through Wonka’s world of pure imagination. Get ready for Oompa-Loompas, amazing inventions, the big glass elevator, and more, more, more at this everlasting spectacle!

The hit Broadway musical features songs from the original film, including “Pure Imagination,” “The Candy Man” and “I’ve Got a Golden Ticket,” plus a raucous, ticklish new score from the songwriters of Hairspray.

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY by Roald Dahl is directed by Matt Lenz, based on the original national tour direction by three-time Tony Award winner Jack O’Brien. Original music by Grammy, Emmy and Tony Award winner Marc Shaiman, lyrics by Grammy and Tony Award winner Scott Wittman and Marc Shaiman, a book by the artistic director of the Royal Edinburgh’s Lyceum Theatre, David Greig, based on original choreography by Tony Award-nominated and Emmy Award-winning Joshua Bergasse and includes additional songs by Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley from the Warner Bros. from 1971.

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY by Roald Dahl features original set and costume design by five-time Tony Award nominee Mark Thompson, which has been recreated by Christine Peters; lighting design by four-time Tony Award nominee Japhy Weideman, sound design by Andrew Keister, projection design by Jeff Sugg, puppet and illusion design by Obie and Basil Twist, Drama Desk Award winner, hair design and wigs by Campbell Young Associates/Luc Verschueren and orchestrations by three-time Tony Award winner Doug Besterman.

CHARLIE AND THE CHOCOLATE FACTORY by Roald Dahl is produced by NETworks Presentations.

For more information, visit www.CharlieOnTour.com.

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Sci-Fi Film Festival Plots Hybrid Future For Return In Person: Other Worlds Are Coming To Galaxy Highland And Beyond https://acotonline.org/sci-fi-film-festival-plots-hybrid-future-for-return-in-person-other-worlds-are-coming-to-galaxy-highland-and-beyond/ Sat, 04 Dec 2021 02:58:58 +0000 https://acotonline.org/sci-fi-film-festival-plots-hybrid-future-for-return-in-person-other-worlds-are-coming-to-galaxy-highland-and-beyond/ [ad_1] Hybrids have always been the future. Whether it was Dr. Moreau’s human-animal hybrids, the Terminator with flesh on metal, or Data growing a metaphorical human heart under its synthetic skin, the ability to combine the new and the old has been at the heart of science fiction. As the pandemic continues, it’s no surprise […]]]>


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Hybrids have always been the future. Whether it was Dr. Moreau’s human-animal hybrids, the Terminator with flesh on metal, or Data growing a metaphorical human heart under its synthetic skin, the ability to combine the new and the old has been at the heart of science fiction. As the pandemic continues, it’s no surprise that Other Worlds – Austin’s film festival with an electronic eye on the possible future – keeps the streaming component it launched last year, even if he returns to Galaxy Highland for theatrical screenings.

“We knew we wanted to be in person, no matter what,” said founder and artistic director Rebecca Bears Fonté, “but we also know that it wouldn’t be fair to some people who are immunosuppressed or just don’t feel good. not yet comfortable with must miss the festival. ” The rule for 2021 was therefore simple: each film accepted had to be ready to be screened both in person (December 2 to 5) and as part of the virtual event (December 6 to 12).

“[These films] deal with that tech problem of “Here’s something new, I want to try it” and get over your head. “– Rebecca Bears Fonté

That meant fewer distributor titles and more independent filmmakers, but it didn’t impact the quality, and Fonté noted that Other Worlds lead programmer Dan Repp called it the best programming in the game. festival in eight years of history. Thematically, many titles deal with two or three themes: claustrophobia (“being stuck in a place, either in a house, or on a planet or in a spaceship”) or facing the consequences of a new ubiquitous technology, “and that’s a testament to our current willingness to move on,” Fonté said. However, this was not directly inspired by the pandemic. In fact, only one feature, the selection of horror strands Underworlds Wicked games, was filmed during the pandemic. Instead, the rest were filmed before COVID, and the filmmakers just took the time to hone and refine them. “The visuals are better than we expected,” Fonté said, “and there’s more to it.”

After his horror of hairdressing the stylist starred as part of the Return to the Galaxy festival last May, UT alumnus Brea Grant returns in a double roll – as the co-writer of the opening night sci-fi identity comedy Madeleines, and deliver the virtual opening speech of the festival. At the end of the event in person will be Arcadian residents, which Fonté described as “a film about immigration, made in Canada by an Italian, so it’s not immigration you normally think of, but it’s also about immigrating to a virtual world” . In between, this recurring theme of the dangers of being an early adopter is highlighted in the two flagship selections, the augmented reality thriller. Extended view and smart home cooler Dark cloud. Fonté noted that both films are from first-time directors and both “deal with that technological problem of” Here’s something new, I want to try it “and get past you.”

All of these titles and more (including the winner of the Defender of the Universe retrospective, the classic kids’ 80s space adventure Navigator flight) will be available to badge holders, whether they’re watching everything at home or just wanting to catch up on what they missed at the movies. After all, Fonté said: “You can’t be in three theaters at the same time.” Or maybe someone just needs to work on cloning and time travel …


Other Worlds Film Festival 2021, Galaxy Highland, 6700 Middle Fiskville, December 2-5; streaming via Eventive, from December 6 to 12.


Pass and info on otherworldsfilmfest.com.

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Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos to Light Up the Nightingale Concert Hall with Lincoln Center’s Chamber Music Society https://acotonline.org/bachs-brandenburg-concertos-to-light-up-the-nightingale-concert-hall-with-lincoln-centers-chamber-music-society/ Tue, 30 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/bachs-brandenburg-concertos-to-light-up-the-nightingale-concert-hall-with-lincoln-centers-chamber-music-society/ Apex Concerts and Performing Arts Series at the School of the Arts, University of Nevada, Reno, features the complete Brandenburg Concertos of Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Lincoln Center’s renowned Chamber Music Society. On Thursday, December 9 at 7 p.m., the Nightingale Concert Hall stage will host a line-up of 20 star musicians from the […]]]>

Apex Concerts and Performing Arts Series at the School of the Arts, University of Nevada, Reno, features the complete Brandenburg Concertos of Johann Sebastian Bach, performed by Lincoln Center’s renowned Chamber Music Society.

On Thursday, December 9 at 7 p.m., the Nightingale Concert Hall stage will host a line-up of 20 star musicians from the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society’s multi-generational international roster, performing the complete Bach Brandenburg Concertos. Widely regarded as the greatest examples of Baroque instrumental music, these six masterpieces unfailingly uplift music lovers of all backgrounds and are a perfect vehicle to inspire strength at the end of the year and a vision for the future. more shiny.

“This is a rare and unusual opportunity to hear these Baroque masterpieces performed in their entirety by some of the world’s finest musicians on our own Nightingale stage. It’s a music marathon not to be missed,” said Hyeyeon Park, Co-Artistic Director of Apex Concerts.

The December 9 performance is part of a nationwide tour that will visit many of the country’s most prestigious concert halls, including New York’s Alice Tully Hall. University of Nevada, Reno’s own music teacher, Dmitri Atapine, is on a national tour and will perform at the concert in Reno.

“To be back on stages across the country, alongside dear colleagues and performing some of the most transcendent music is very special,” says Atapine, Co-Artistic Director of Apex Concerts. “It is a testament to the power and importance of the arts – of music – in our lives as the nation begins to emerge from the pandemic. Seeing the public fill our halls, applaud… it’s so humbling and reassuring!

“We are thrilled to partner with Apex Concerts and share this amazing musicianship and music with our community. It’s something we don’t get to experience every day in Reno and a wonderful opportunity for our community to see these masterpieces performed in person and in such an incredible location,” said Shoshana. Zeldner, Program Manager for the Performing Arts Series.

Tickets are available online (unr.edu/pas), by phone through the Lawlor Events Center (775-784-4444) or in person at the Lawlor Events Center box office (10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday , 1500 N. Virginia St. Reno, lower level entrance).

Tickets are $31-$36 (adults), $16 (youth), and $5 (students from the University of Nevada, Reno). University student tickets must be purchased in person at the Lawlor Events Center or at the box office the night of the show (at the event venue, opens one hour before the show).

The Brandenburg Concertos conclude the fall program of Apex Concerts and the Performing Arts Series. Apex Concerts continues on January 26, 2022 with Masters and Apprentices, celebrating the master-apprentice tradition with cellist David Finckel and clarinetist David Shifrin.

The performing arts series continues on February 24, 2022 with renowned Irish ensemble Goitse.

In addition to the Apex Concerts and Performing Arts Series, the School of the Arts presents the Reno Jazz Festival and Lake Tahoe Music Camp as well as world-class visual art exhibits, musical performances, theater productions , dance concerts, and public arts events presented by the Art, Music, and Theater and Dance departments. The School of the Arts, along with the College of Liberal Arts, encourages broad campus and community participation in the arts through numerous performances, lectures, exhibits, core courses, and outreach activities that explore diverse cultures and encourage lifelong learning. The School of the Art’s degree programs provide a solid foundation in a range of artistic disciplines, enabling students to contribute as artists, educators and scholars locally and beyond.

The Performing Arts Series is funded in part by WESTAF (the Western States Arts Federation); the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; and the Nevada Arts Council, a state agency. The Performing Arts Series and Apex Concerts are supported by the University of Nevada Student Associates and the Graduate Student Association. In-kind support is provided by CLM Design, Advertising, Interactive.

The 2021-22 Performing Arts Series is funded in part by WESTAF (The Western States Arts Federation); the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency; the University of Nevada Associate Students and the Graduate Student Association. In-kind support is provided by CLM Design, Advertising, Interactive.

For more information about the School of the Arts, visit the School of the Arts website, call 775-784-4278, or email arts@unr.edu. Event information, news and photos are also available by following the School of Arts Instagram, School of Arts Twitter and the School of Arts Facebook page.

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The festival explores the role of folklore in horror films https://acotonline.org/the-festival-explores-the-role-of-folklore-in-horror-films/ Sat, 27 Nov 2021 08:01:05 +0000 https://acotonline.org/the-festival-explores-the-role-of-folklore-in-horror-films/ [ad_1] When she returned to her hometown to take on the position of Assistant Programmer at the Winnipeg Cinematheque in 2007, Kier-La Janisse brought a bold voice to the film’s already vaunted reputation. Prior to leaving in 2008 to launch her microcinema, Blue Sunshine, in Montreal, she launched, among other things, the Saturday Morning Cartoon […]]]>


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When she returned to her hometown to take on the position of Assistant Programmer at the Winnipeg Cinematheque in 2007, Kier-La Janisse brought a bold voice to the film’s already vaunted reputation.

Prior to leaving in 2008 to launch her microcinema, Blue Sunshine, in Montreal, she launched, among other things, the Saturday Morning Cartoon Cereal Party (the TV cartoon / breakfast food frenzy was a holdover from her days of programmer at Austin ?? s Alamo Drafthouse), Plastic Paper, an animated and illustrated puppet film festival, and cutting-edge documentary festival Gimme Some Truth, that she was planning to showcase the kind of films that left you with the impression of having been struck. the face.??

During her stay here, she worked closely with the late Artistic Director of the Cinémathèque Dave Barber.

?? It’s hard to imagine the Cinémathèque without Dave, ?? she says. ?? It really is his theater. He had such a unique perspective on things, he championed so many Canadian filmmakers, but it was never to fill a quota or meet a funding requirement ?? he really loved canadian cinema and saw all the things that made him idiosyncratic and weird. ??

So it’s fitting that Janisse returns to Winnipeg from her home on Pender Island, British Columbia as headliner at December’s Gimme Some Truth Festival in her new capacity as a documentary maker. Janisse brings her epic three-hour documentary Bewitched Dark and Days Woodlands, a fascinating examination of popular horror in cinema, as the cornerstone of this year’s festival.


Janisse has been working on the film for years now, acknowledging that she had been fascinated by popular horror for a decade.

It was really around 2010 when the term was used in Mark Gatiss ?? s (BBC TV series) A horror story and people started to use it more? Janisse said in a phone interview from her home.

In theaters, a few exciting films have emerged as exciting new variations of the form, both directed by Ben Wheatley: Kill list and A field in England ?? and I started to see the term folk horror popping up a lot in articles, especially in UK magazines. ??

Janisse, 49, had the chance to act on her personal fascination thanks to Severin Films, an American film production / distribution company specializing in the restoration of cult films and their release on Blu-ray. Janisse has been working there since 2017, mainly as a producer and editor, creating additional DVD material for various releases.

?? It really started with the announcement by Severin Films of the film’s release. Blood on Satan’s claw around May 2018, ?? she says. ?? So I suggested to my boss David (Gregory), ?? For an extra, why don’t we do a folk horror documentary ???

?? He said, ?? OK, sure, go do it. ?? So that was it. ??




This mission would take Janisse years, drawing on her many contacts at the Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies, the organization she founded in 2010 dedicated to the serious study of genre films. For Forests, Janisse has interviewed 50 filmmakers, critics and academics, and concocted sequences for more than 200 films.

?? It was really meant to be a short featurette that would go on another Blu-ray, ?? she says. ?? And in a few months, I returned a piece that was over two hours long … so it was longer than Blood on Satan’s claw, ?? she says. So instead of telling me where to cut it to get it down, David said, “You have about half of a feature here. Why not continue ????

While the doc’s lineup of films spans roughly a century of directing, it does seem relevant, Janisse says.

“I think there’s a lot of talk in folk horror movies about community and what community means and the kinds of things people sacrifice to be part of a community,”? Janisse said. Which of these things are good things and which of these things are bad ???

As a bonus, Janisse also worked with Winnipeg filmmaker Guy Maddin, who designed the film’s stunning animated collages.

?? I knew Guy made collages because he had a very active Instagram account where he always posted them ?? Janisse said. “And very early on, I knew I needed some kind of flair for the movie that I wasn’t really capable of.




?? So I asked Guy if he was considering making collages around vague themes ?? occult and nature / landscape ?? that I could animate myself for the film, ?? she says. ?? And luckily for me, he obliged. ??

● ● ●

Woodlands Dark and Days Bewitched: A Popular Horror Story screenings at the Cinémathèque on Saturday December 4 at 7:30 p.m. (with an introduction by Janisse), with additional screenings on Friday December 10 at 9:15 p.m. and Sunday January 2 at 3 p.m.

The film is already available online through services such as iTunes, and will arrive on Blu-ray on December 7, alone and as the centerpiece of a monster 15-disc box set with a total of 19 folk horror films. included. .

Additionally, the juggernaut Janisse will resume much of the Cinematheque’s December programming with additional screenings of folk horror films, including:

Blood on Satan’s claw




Described in Janisse’s film as one of three fundamental folk horror films (alongside Sorcerer General and The wicker man), this 1971 thriller from director Piers Haggard visits an 18th-century rural village where young people seem to be overrun by a demonic presence. It is screened on Tuesday December 7 at 7 p.m., Wednesday December 15 at 9:10 p.m., Thursday December 30 at 9:15 p.m. and Sunday January 2 at 7:00 p.m.

Clear cut

One of the rare Canadian examples of the folk horror form, this 1991 film from director Ryszard B Portugueseki stars Graham Greene (in his favorite role) as a trickster who kidnaps the manager of a logging company. to teach him a hard lesson. in environmentalism. It is screened on Tuesday December 7 at 9:30 p.m., Thursday December 16 at 9:15 p.m., Sunday December 19 at 3:00 p.m. and Wednesday January 5 at 7:00 p.m.

The wicker man

The serene summit of the realm of popular horror, Robin Hardy’s subversive 1973 thriller pits an austere Christian policeman (Edward Woodward) against the charismatic Lord Summerisle (Christopher Lee) on a remote island populated by a pagan population under the influence of Summerisle. . It airs on Friday December 17 at 7 p.m., Wednesday December 22 at 9:15 p.m., Tuesday December 28 at 9:05 p.m. and Thursday December 30 at 7 p.m.

Environment ?? Director’s Cup

Ari Aster reinvigorated popular horror in this Wicker man-esque 2019 film, the sequel to equally impressive Hereditary, with a story of American college students taking a trip to rural Sweden, where they encounter a bizarre pagan cult with deadly inclinations. It will be broadcast on Saturday December 18 at 1 p.m., Sunday December 19 at 7 p.m., Sunday December 26 at 7 p.m., Thursday December 30 at 2:30 p.m. and Wednesday January 5 at 9:15 p.m.

The full Cinémathèque program is online at www.winnipegfilmgroup.com.

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