Drafthouse austin – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Sat, 01 Oct 2022 09:21:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Drafthouse austin – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 What did you miss? – Nerds black girls https://acotonline.org/what-did-you-miss-nerds-black-girls/ Fri, 30 Sep 2022 21:35:37 +0000 https://acotonline.org/what-did-you-miss-nerds-black-girls/ Last week, Fantastic Fest returned once again and took the movie community of Austin, TX by storm. Moviegoers and industry leaders from far and wide attended America’s wackiest and biggest genre film festival. Another notable mention and a well-received film is that of Luca Guadagnino bones and all, with Timothée Chalamet and Taylor Russell. bones […]]]>

Last week, Fantastic Fest returned once again and took the movie community of Austin, TX by storm.

Moviegoers and industry leaders from far and wide attended America’s wackiest and biggest genre film festival.

Another notable mention and a well-received film is that of Luca Guadagnino bones and all, with Timothée Chalamet and Taylor Russell. bones and all is scheduled to premiere on November 23, 2022, and the festival screening had an industry leader tweeting:

“I knew I would like it but #BonesandAll became my favorite movie of the year. What a beautifully heartbreaking cinematic experience. Taylor Russell and Timothée Chalamet are exquisite and Luca Guadagnino is a true master storyteller. #FantasticFest

Luckily for you, BGN got the scoop. Check out some of our movie reviews below:

porcine (premieres October 14, 2022)

The Menu (premiering November 18, 2022)

Fantastic Fest officially kicked off on Thursday, September 22, 2022, and yesterday marked the end of the legendary film festival. The quirky and fun event was a perfect fit for Austin’s renowned love of all things weird.

If you’re new to Fantastic Fest, you’re not alone. It was also my first time!

Historically, Fantastic Fest has always been a genre festival. The event usually caters to cult crowds and hosts films from around the world. Whether it’s action, fantasy, sci-fi or horror, Fantastic Fest has advocated for productions large and small. In fact, the festival has even hosted world premieres for huge fans such as John Wick, Zombieland, Bone Tomahawk, and Frankenweenie.

Q&A with Hong Chau from The menu (Photo credit: Jack Plunkett)

How are films selected for screening at Fantastic Fest?

In their own words:

“The festival is dedicated to promoting empowering and thought-provoking cinema, celebrating new voices and stories from around the world, and supporting new filmmakers. We work with various other festivals, archives, film libraries and individuals to shine a light on lesser-known cinematic regions, luminaries and more in an ongoing effort to broaden general knowledge and appreciation of cinema.

“We are committed to supporting cinema in its most provocative, revolutionary and underappreciated forms, and to giving audiences a chance to find new favorites and future classics of the genre. Each year, we bring together fans, guests, industry, press and others in an inclusive and fun environment for a week-long celebration of film in all its forms through carefully curated screenings and events, at inside and outside cinemas.

Although Fantastic Fest has been going on for nearly 20 years, it sometimes goes unnoticed by even the most avid moviegoers. I was surprised that it has historically been housed at the Alamo Drafthouse since 2005.

Why the Alamo Drafthouse?

Well, it turns out that one of the founders of Fantastic Fest is none other than entrepreneur Tim League. Tim is the founder of the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema chain and Drafthouse Movies. As a native and local Austin film producer, it’s no surprise why Fantastic Fest calls Austin home.

Also, can I just say that if you haven’t had the Herb and Parmesan Popcorn at Alamo Drafthouse… you’RE SERIOUSLY MISSING! I mean, was nobody going to say anything until I left??! My God!

Who is Fantastic Fest for and is it worth attending?

If you love movies, ABSOLUTELY!

If you want the opportunity to be one of the first to see specially selected independent films and high-profile productions, YES!

If you want to support promising directors, artists, writers and creatives, HECK YEAH!

If you want to connect with super down-to-earth industry professionals and fellow moviegoers, THIS IS FOR YOU!

If you’re a horror or sci-fi fanatic who wants variety, NEED SAY MORE?

If you’ve been waiting to explore various international films and documentaries without the extra expense of an international flight to attend large-scale festivals, COME ON!

If you couldn’t tell, Fantastic Fest 2022 was a big hit. This first time had an absolute blast! It was quirky, humble, fun and full of wonderful surprises. My favorite movie was The visitor from the future – FINGERS IN THE NOSE! I hate to admit it, but it was actually the movie I had the least expectations for when I walked into the theater to take my seat. However, within three minutes of the movie starting, I was immediately captivated and laughed out loud.

My God, even writing about it right now makes me smile lovingly! It’s safe to say that I’m obsessed with this hilarious French comedy and it was my personal big winner of the event!

Until next time, all of you! 🤠

Christine Nbemeneh

Christine Nbemeneh is a content creator and book editor who loves all things Harry Potter, Marvel, DC, Disney and BTS! Be sure to check out more of his work at starfirepress.com.

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The menu, Piggy takes the honors https://acotonline.org/the-menu-piggy-takes-the-honors/ Tue, 27 Sep 2022 17:20:04 +0000 https://acotonline.org/the-menu-piggy-takes-the-honors/ Another Fantastic Fest is coming to a close, and we’ve got the full list of Fantastic Fest 2022 award winners – including Searchlight Pictures’ upcoming release ‘The Menu’. The film festival, held at the Alamo Drafthouse on South Lamar in Austin, Texas, is one of the nation’s premier genre film festivals and has led to […]]]>

Another Fantastic Fest is coming to a close, and we’ve got the full list of Fantastic Fest 2022 award winners – including Searchlight Pictures’ upcoming release ‘The Menu’.

The film festival, held at the Alamo Drafthouse on South Lamar in Austin, Texas, is one of the nation’s premier genre film festivals and has led to more acquisitions than South by Southwest, which has held in Austin each spring. A joyous celebration of all genres, this year was no different – with hyped titles like Searchlight’s “The Menu” and MGM’s “Bones and All” playing alongside more esoteric fare like “Shin Ultraman”. There was even a high-profile premiere from Marvel Studios in their upcoming black-and-white Halloween special, “Werewolf by Night” (which really knocked the house down).

“We really gave our jury members a hard time this year. We have no idea how they were able to choose between so many amazing films,” festival director Lisa Dreyer said in an official statement. “We are so grateful to all of our filmmakers for sharing their phenomenal films with our audiences, and the jury’s picks truly epitomize the wild and wonderful cinematic excellence that we love to champion at Fantastic Fest.”

In the ‘Main Competition’ feature film category, Eduardo Casanova’s ‘La Pietà’ won Best Picture while Best Director went to Ali Abassi for his chilling ‘Holy Spider’. In the “The Next Wave” category, Léa Mysius’ “The Five Devils” (coming soon on Mubi) won Best Film and Thomas Hardiman won Best Director for A24’s “Medusa Deluxe”. In the “Horror Feature” category, Carlota Pereda’s “Piggy” won Best Picture while Mike Mendez, Demian Rugna, Eduardo Sanchez, Gigi Saul Guerrero and Alejandro Brugués shared the Best Director award for the film. “Satanic Hispanics” anthology.

For “Shorts With Legs,” Kevin Ralston’s “Hubbards” won Best Picture and “Alegrias Riojanas,” directed by Velasco Broca, earned a Special Mention. In the “Short Fuse” category, “Ringworms” directed by Will Lee won Best Picture, while “Gnomes” directed by Ruwan Heggelman received a Special Mention. In the “Fantastic Shorts” section, “The Diamond” directed by Vedran Rupic won the best film award and “A Man Trembles” by Mark Chua, Lam Li Shuen (Emoumie) got the special mention. For “Drawn and Quartered,” Boyoung Kim-directed “A Guitar in the Bucket” won Best Picture and Andrea Gatopoulos-directed “Happy New Year, Jim” earned Special Mention.

Finally, the Audience Award went to Searchlight’s “The Menu,” directed by Mark Mylod. See the full list of winners below and for more information on the award-winning films, go here.

And if you have severe FOMO, Fantastic Fest at Home starts online tomorrow.

“MAIN COMPETITIONS” CHARACTERISTICS

Best film: LA PIETÀ directed by Eduardo Casanova

Best Director: Ali Abassi for HOLY SPIDER

“NEXT WAVE” FEATURES

Best film: THE FIVE DEVILS directed by Léa Mysius

Best Director: Thomas Hardiman for MEDUSA DELUXE

HORROR FEATURES

Best Film: PIGGY directed by Carlota Pereda

Best Directors: Mike Mendez, Demian Rugna, Eduardo Sanchez, Gigi Saul Guerrero & Alejandro Brugués for SATANIC HISPANICS

SHORTS WITH LEGS

Best Film: HUBBARDS directed by Kevin Ralston

Special mention: ALEGRÍAS RIOJANAS directed by Velasco Broca

SHORT WICK

Best Film: RINGWORMS directed by Will Lee

Special mention: GNOME directed by Ruwan Heggelman

FANTASTIC SHORTS

Best film: THE DIAMOND directed by Vedran Rupic

Special mention to A MAN TREMBLES directed by Mark Chua, Lam Li Shuen (Emoumie)

DRAWN AND CUT

Best Film: A GUITAR IN A BUCKET directed by Boyoung Kim

Special mention to HAPPY NEW YEAR, JIM directed by Andrea Gatopoulos

AUDIENCE AWARD

THE MENU directed by Mark Mylod

The Golden Globes are back on NBC - but the stars

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Film critic Leonard Maltin meets his furry namesake at Fantastic Fest 2022 https://acotonline.org/film-critic-leonard-maltin-meets-his-furry-namesake-at-fantastic-fest-2022/ Sat, 24 Sep 2022 22:41:53 +0000 https://acotonline.org/film-critic-leonard-maltin-meets-his-furry-namesake-at-fantastic-fest-2022/ article Film critic Leonard Maltin met his furry counterpart while attending Fantastic Fest at the Alamo Drafthouse in South Lamar. (Austin Pets Alive!) AUSTIN, TX – It’s not every day that you come across a pup named after you, but now film critic Leonard Maltin can say he did! Maltin was attending the 2022 Fantastic […]]]>

Film critic Leonard Maltin met his furry counterpart while attending Fantastic Fest at the Alamo Drafthouse in South Lamar. (Austin Pets Alive!)

It’s not every day that you come across a pup named after you, but now film critic Leonard Maltin can say he did!

Maltin was attending the 2022 Fantastic Fest film festival at the Alamo Drafthouse South Lamar today when Austin Pets Alive! surprised him with a visit from one of their adoptable puppies, also named Leonard Maltin.

Puppy Leonard is a two-month-old parvovirus survivor, along with his sister and kennel mate, Meryl Streep, says Austin Pets Alive. Leonard and Meryl are ready to be adopted at the APA’s Town Lake location.

“Our friends at Fantastic Fest were kind enough to set up the reunion and talk about it. Little Leonard is a really adorable dog, and everyone couldn’t help but fall in love with him,” said said Leonard Maltin. “Hopefully we can get Austin Pets Alive’s attention and find some great homes.”

Puppy Leonard also got to meet Jessie Maltin, who co-hosts a podcast with her dad called Maltin on Movies.

This magical moment happened after friends of Jessie Maltin sent her a TikTok APA video! posted of all of their shelter’s adoptable pets named after famous people, including Leonard Maltin, actor Robert DeNiro, and actors Owen Wilson and Luke Wilson.

“Several friends sent me the video after seeing it on Instagram, and I commented. Suzie Chase contacted me to ask if a photo of Big Leonard/Little Leonard was possible. Glad to oblige,” Jessie Maltin told FOX 7 Austin.

If you’re interested in adopting puppy Leonard, his sister Meryl, or one of the adoptable puppies from APA!’s Town Lake Animal Center, the organization is waiving typical adoption fees through October 3. Adopters can name their own adoption fees for the puppies. at their main location on West Cesar Chavez, not including surgery depots. Foster puppies are not eligible for the promotion.

To learn more about adopting a pet from APA!, click here.

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Diversification – Boulder Weekly https://acotonline.org/diversification-boulder-weekly/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 16:52:42 +0000 https://acotonline.org/diversification-boulder-weekly/ Next time you lament a bad driver in Boulder with a Texas license plate, or see another “Go back to Texas and tell your friends Colorado sucks” bumper sticker, remember that a lot of the good stuff we’re enjoying here comes from the Lone Star State: Alamo Drafthouse, Torchy’s Tacos and Dave Kennedy, founder of […]]]>

Next time you lament a bad driver in Boulder with a Texas license plate, or see another “Go back to Texas and tell your friends Colorado sucks” bumper sticker, remember that a lot of the good stuff we’re enjoying here comes from the Lone Star State: Alamo Drafthouse, Torchy’s Tacos and Dave Kennedy, founder of the local nonprofit Roots Music Project.

Kennedy sold the Texas-based company that became Match.com, which he co-founded in 1996, and has partnered with Alamo Drafthouse since its first branch in Austin in 2004. With his new venture Front Range designed to give musicians and venues locals a boost, the 56-year-old plans to bring small gigs back to Boulder.

The Fox and Boulder theaters keep a real grip on live music here, and local artists are looking for something between the cafe and small bar scene and the big venues. That’s where the Roots Music Project comes in, providing performance space for local musicians and providing a suite of services to help Boulder establishments develop thriving live music programs.

As a student at the University of Texas, Kennedy was obsessed with blues music at the legendary Antone’s, where as a child his parents sneaked him into a Muddy Waters concert. His love of music stayed with him but didn’t become a big part of his professional life until he moved to Colorado in 2004.

“I graduated, had a corporate career, started a business, had kids, and had played a little guitar in high school, but I pretty much put the guitar down. under the bed until I was 40,” Kennedy said. “My kids started rock camp at Dog House Music [in Lafayette] and saw they had a music camp for adults. I wanted to play with other people so I did and met a bunch of people and got a horrible band, but we had fun playing. We rented a practice space and when we finally practiced and were good enough to play gigs somewhere, I started trying to network and say, “How can we get a gig ?”

But the band struggled to find places to play.

“I said, ‘OK, we’re going to start a nonprofit and we’re going to put on concerts, and then we’ll just put on shows, pay the bands, and create opportunities,'” Kennedy said. national numbers, but we always match them with a local support number, that’s part of the philosophy.

That’s why Kennedy founded the Roots Music Project, which secured its current space in 2019 – inside one of the warehouses near Pearl Street and 47th Street – and recently took on its mission “to foster the local scene for musicians, fans and venues” in overdrive with concerts, lessons, rehearsal availability and more.

“The three pillars are the fans, the artists and the places,” says Kennedy. He says he realizes the importance of small venues like Denver’s Hi-Dive, where on their way to headlining big clubs and theaters, bands can grow into a place where people only come through the door to see live music. The tiny Velvet Elk Lounge helps bridge that gap in Boulder, as does Roots.

In addition to hosting concerts, lessons, and rehearsals, Roots offers free songwriting circles and even a service where a backing band learns musicians’ original compositions and helps bring them to life. There is also talk of launching DIY management and advertising workshops.

Muddy Waters guitarist Bob Margolin, once a staple at Boulder’s much-missed Outlook Hotel, will play Roots on Friday, September 30 and host an invitation-only Masterclass Blues Workshop the night before.

Back to form

Managing a space that is both a venue and an incubator, Kennedy draws inspiration from Fort Collins’ strong local music community, particularly the city’s vital music district.

“We are on a smaller scale than them. We try to clarify our purpose and our history,” he says. “We have a big event space, but the mission is really much bigger than that. We aspire to do more things.

Roots also offers local musicians the opportunity to work and volunteer in the space, from sound management to social media. Everyone seems fair care.

During a sold-out show at Roots on a steamy Friday night in July, the venue opened its large garage door to air out and let the music flood the community. It was like one of those unforgettable nights watching music in high school or college when the venue could be anywhere — your parents’ basement, a clothing store, a skate park — and being part of a local scene was all that mattered.

Gasoline Lollipops frontman Clay Rose, who Kennedy says “has deep Boulder roots” (no pun intended), held his first songwriting showcase at Roots on Sept. 21, with others at come on Thursdays of every month in the future.

“It’s been my hope for the past decade that someone would open a small independent listening room in Boulder. Starting in the mid-1990s, they were all systematically taken down due to corporate greed in one form or another,” says Rose. “When I heard that Dave had opened Roots Music Project, I jumped at the chance to pitch him my idea for a monthly songwriter showcase. He seemed equally eager to host the event, as our visions of nurturing Boulder’s declining music scene were seemingly parallel.

As the Roots Music Project continues to expand its offerings for local artists, Rose says the nonprofit’s ultimate value lies in its potential to restore a once-thriving local music scene.

“Boulder was once known nationwide as a town where new artists could flourish,” he says. “I am grateful to Dave. His understanding of Boulder’s history and our current gold mine of talent might be just what this town needs to regenerate its amputated limbs.


On the bill: Raw Chicago Blues with Bob Margolin (Muddy Waters guitarist). Doors 6:30 p.m. and music 7:30 p.m. Friday, September 30, Roots Music Project, 4747 Pearl St., Suite V3A, Boulder. Tickets: $15 to $25 on Eventbrite

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Alamo Drafthouse founder Tim League has resumed his role as the Perfect Host. https://acotonline.org/alamo-drafthouse-founder-tim-league-has-resumed-his-role-as-the-perfect-host/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 09:53:42 +0000 https://acotonline.org/alamo-drafthouse-founder-tim-league-has-resumed-his-role-as-the-perfect-host/ Famous Texas Jewelry Star Kendra ScottThe ability to juggle a work-life balance is truly impressive. The founder of her eponymous billion-dollar brand is a newlywed, a returning guest shark for the next season of shark tank, and she is about to file her first memoirs, Born to Shine: Do good, find your joy, and build […]]]>

Famous Texas Jewelry Star Kendra ScottThe ability to juggle a work-life balance is truly impressive. The founder of her eponymous billion-dollar brand is a newlywed, a returning guest shark for the next season of shark tank, and she is about to file her first memoirs, Born to Shine: Do good, find your joy, and build a life you love.

Between a dizzying schedule of brand management, philanthropic endeavors, a multi-state book tour, shark tank duties and nurturing a new blended family of eight, we wonder when the Austin-based entrepreneur will have time to breathe.

Apparently, queso, margaritas and finding joy in the little things keep the entrepreneur going. Scott also credits her marriage to Thomas Evans (her wedding ring is the only piece of jewelry she never takes off) and the relationship with her family, including three sons – Kade, Beck and Gray – as the foundations of her success.

And while her jewelry has been a go-to accessory for more than two decades, her first foray into the literary world was one of vulnerability and determination.

After kicking off his book tour in Houston earlier this week, Scott will be at the company’s South Congress Flagship in Austin this Saturday, Sept. 17, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Tickets for the event are still available on Eventbrite, and each ticket includes a copy of the book, a meet and greet with Kendra, an exclusive tote bag, and more.

Ahead of the Austin event, Scott sat down with CultureMap in Houston to get an exclusive on his next chapter.

CultureMap: How long did it take you to write Born to shine?

Kendra Scott: It took a little over two years from the time I decided to write the book, but in reality I’ve been writing this book for years. I never realized that my journal notes would one day turn into a book. It’s been a long process, but after 20 years of our business, it was honestly the perfect time to write this book.

CM: How did you juggle writing, running the business, and being a working mom?

KS: You know, it’s always a challenge. If someone tells you it’s easy and they get it, I think they’re lying. I wrote this during the pandemic so I was working from home with the support system of my loved ones with me. All our meetings were virtual, so it allowed me to have time to reflect.

I had also just stepped down as CEO and could just focus on being president, designer, and founder. I was able to focus more on our philanthropic endeavors, like our school at the University of Texas (Women’s Entrepreneurial Leadership Institute), and focus on writing this book. It’s something I’ve always wanted to do.

CM: How do you relate to yourself personally in the book?

KS: I become very vulnerable in the book and I feel there is power in vulnerability. I hope being vulnerable allows other women or people to share their failures, successes, ups and downs and be authentic.

I also hope that the stories of my childhood, my marriage, my divorce, starting a business and failing a business – all of these things are part of what makes me who I am. In the book, I talk about the power of gemstones. Gems all have veins that are considered imperfections, but that’s really what makes them beautiful.

CM: Is there anything you wrote but then changed your mind?

KS: I pulled out the whole first chapter, and I wasn’t going to put it in there. My editor, who is also my editor, told me the chapter was great and she thought it should be the first chapter.

It made me realize that I had to be honest because the book starts out in a tough place but then takes readers on an amazing adventure.

CM: Can fans expect more books in the future?

KS: You know, I thought about it. Now that this book is out in the world, I don’t think it will be the last. It’s a different way of being creative, and I think I have other stories to tell.

I would like to make a children’s book one day. My eldest son was one year old when I started this business; now he’s 20, so he grew up with the business. Now I have a nine-year-old, and I’ve always read to him. I really hope that children’s books will be part of my future.

KS: Why did you decide to start your reading tour in Houston?

CM: Houston is part of who I am. That’s where I became a Texan. I moved here from Wisconsin when I was 16 and graduated from Klein High School. Moving at 16 and as a junior can be tough, but I was adopted to Klein – the community was so welcoming.

Houston made me the woman I am today. It made me realize that there is more to the world than the small town in Wisconsin where I grew up. Houston is such a vibrant city, full of culture and diversity – I felt like it was really important for me to start here because it was my first start in Texas.

CM: You come back to shark tank for Season 14. How was the experience this time around?

KS: I love to be on shark tank. I’ll be flying to Los Angeles for the premiere with all the other guest sharks on September 23, and it’s exciting because there’s never been a live premiere.

Nothing inspires me more than other entrepreneurs. There are long shooting days, but they pass quickly because it motivates me to meet other entrepreneurs. Many of these people had ideas before the pandemic, and the downtime during the pandemic gave them the opportunity to put their ideas into action. I can witness it a bit in the tank – it’s so much fun.

CM: There’s a lot going on, but is there anything else fans can look forward to before the end of the year?

KS: We just launched engagement rings and a whole bridal collection which is so exciting. We’re expanding into other fine jewelry categories, including diamonds and gold, and adding more customization options than ever before.

Scott Brothers, the line I started with my boys during the pandemic, is also expanding. It’s so much fun that our male customers who were here to buy for the women in their lives can now buy something for themselves. We just expanded to watches as well, so there’s a lot going on.

If you think about it, it took Ralph Lauren 25 years to expand into other categories. Our company has been around for 20 years, so I really love that Kendra Scott’s next phase is so fun and exciting. From a philanthropic perspective, we have given more than $50 million since 2010 to charities for women and children. We are, in many ways, a philanthropic organization within a brand. This is how we measure success, so I look forward to announcing our charitable efforts in the years to come.

We have a solid base and know what we stand for and stand for – I feel like the best is yet to come.

Kendra Scott’s first memoir comes out September 20.

Courtesy of Kendra Scott

Kendra Scott’s first memoir comes out September 20.

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Closure of Regal Cinemas in Anaheim Hills, Irvine and Calabasas – Orange County Register https://acotonline.org/closure-of-regal-cinemas-in-anaheim-hills-irvine-and-calabasas-orange-county-register/ Thu, 15 Sep 2022 22:04:29 +0000 https://acotonline.org/closure-of-regal-cinemas-in-anaheim-hills-irvine-and-calabasas-orange-county-register/ Regal theaters in Anaheim Hills, Irvine and Calabasas will close later this month as owner Cineworld Group reorganizes the chain and its leases in bankruptcy court. The London-based company filed a petition on September 7 in US bankruptcy court in Texas, listing a total of 24 Cineworld-owned cinemas to be closed as the company reorganizes […]]]>

Regal theaters in Anaheim Hills, Irvine and Calabasas will close later this month as owner Cineworld Group reorganizes the chain and its leases in bankruptcy court.

The London-based company filed a petition on September 7 in US bankruptcy court in Texas, listing a total of 24 Cineworld-owned cinemas to be closed as the company reorganizes its operations amid a severe downturn. activities.

The action allows the company to reject its leases in the properties. Locally, they include:

— Anaheim Hills 14, 8030 E. Santa Ana Canyon Road, Anaheim Hills (closes Thursday, September 22)

— Westpark 8, 3735 Alton Parkway, Irvine (closed Thursday, September 22)

– Calabasas Stadium 6, 4767 Commons Way, Calabasas (closes Friday, September 30)

An erosion of the industry

The movie theater sector has continued to erode as more consumers turn to Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime and other home streaming services for entertainment – ​​a trend that has been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The pandemic has been an incredibly difficult time for our business, with forced closures of cinemas and huge disruptions to movie schedules that have gotten us to this point,” Cineworld chief executive Mooky Greidinger said in a statement. communicated.

The company was forced to close its cinemas around the world at the start of the pandemic. It reported losses of $2.7 billion in 2020 and $566 million in 2021.

Cineworld says it has secured $1.94 billion in new financing from existing lenders, which will ensure operations continue during the reorganization. It expects to exit Chapter 11 in the first quarter of 2023, but warned that shareholder investments would suffer.

Bankruptcy will give the company a chance to renegotiate with its owners in the United States and ask for better offers.

World No. 2

Cineworld acquired Regal Entertainment Group (now Regal Cinemas) in 2018 for $3.6 billion, making it the second largest cinema chain in the world, with over 500 theaters in the United States alone.

Cineworld’s website shows that as of December 31, it had 751 cinemas worldwide, with 9,189 screens. They operate under several banners, including Regal, Cineworld, Cinema City, Yes Planet, and Picturehouse.

AMC Theaters is the largest chain with more than 1,000 theaters worldwide and more than 11,000 screens, according to Zippia.

Greidinger said Cineworld’s bankruptcy was part of the company’s “ongoing efforts to strengthen its financial position and pursue deleveraging that will create a more resilient capital structure and efficient business.”

A financial restructuring, he said, “is in the interest of the group and its stakeholders, taken as a whole, in the long term”.

The 14-screen Anaheim Hills theater has been in operation since 1998 under a lease agreement between OTR and Edwards Theaters Circuit Inc.

Westpark 8 has been in operation since 1994 under a lease between Irvine Retail Properties Co. and Edwards Theaters Circuit. Calabasas 6 Stadium has been open since 1997 under a lease agreement between Century Investments Inc., CRM Properties Inc. and Edwards Megaplex Holdings LLC.

Other bankruptcy filings

Cineword is not the only cinema chain to file for bankruptcy protection.

Last year, Pacific Theaters Exhibition Corp. chose to close its 16 ArcLight Cinemas and Pacific Theaters locations. The company filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy to liquidate its remaining assets for its creditors, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

In its Chapter 7 filing, Pacific Theaters said it had liabilities of over $69 million.

The leases for those theaters have since been taken over by larger chains, including Regal, which took over the ArcLight at the Sherman Oaks Galleria in 2021.

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Chop & Steele is a documentary that gives thanks for the strengths https://acotonline.org/chop-steele-is-a-documentary-that-gives-thanks-for-the-strengths/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 17:55:03 +0000 https://acotonline.org/chop-steele-is-a-documentary-that-gives-thanks-for-the-strengths/ The latest film from director Ben Steinbauer, Chop & Steele, is “a feature-length comedy documentary about childhood friends turned professional comedians”. For fans of underground video and weird stuff like Everything Is Terrible!, the Found Footage Festival and Steinbauer’s previous film, Winnebago Mankeeps alive a treasure trove of forgotten VHS trash salvaged from thrift stores […]]]>

The latest film from director Ben Steinbauer, Chop & Steele, is “a feature-length comedy documentary about childhood friends turned professional comedians”. For fans of underground video and weird stuff like Everything Is Terrible!, the Found Footage Festival and Steinbauer’s previous film, Winnebago Mankeeps alive a treasure trove of forgotten VHS trash salvaged from thrift stores and garage sales.

However, Chop & Steele is more than the art of finding and organizing Nick Prueher and Joe Pickett videos. It’s also the story of what happens when this pair takes to the airwaves and infiltrates morning news shows with a series of pranks and finds themselves the victims of a lawsuit. As much a story of friendship as of perseverance, Chop & Steele has a surprising heart for a movie that features grown men stomping on wicker baskets.

The documentary screens at Liberty Hall on Thursday, September 15, and we caught up with director Steinbauer and cinematographer Priest Fontaine Batten (both University of Kansas alumni), as well as Prueher of the Found Footage Festival, to discuss the film and how college towns made it all possible.


The pitch: Priest and Ben, you’re both KU alumni. Did you know each other during your stay at KU?

Ben Steinbauer: I knew Priest back then. Priest is a tough guy not to know. It’s like being with the mayor every time you hang out with Priest. He was famous for these epic parties that he threw and planned weeks in advance. One, in particular, that I always referred to was when he buried a bunch of televisions in the backyard, and he had these video installations.

I remember thinking about the party, after being probably like, six or seven Leinenkugels, “I can’t believe the amount of effort that has gone into this college party.” I think there were several wardrobe changes, and he was a DJ, and those are all things you can expect to see on September 15th.

Fountain Priest Batten: Yeah. I remember the cops came, and I finally had a ride, and they were so impressed. They’re like, “You know what? We’re just gonna leave this party alone. We’ve got a lot of noise complaints, but you guys put too much effort into this party, so we’re gonna let it go.

From what I remember, we started watching KU games together. And I just remember thinking, “These are the nicest people in Oklahoma. They’re the nicest, smartest people in town. I love these guys. I want to be friends for life.

Besides, I just admired Ben’s work from afar. Winnebago Man, obviously blew my mind, so it’s been a dream come true after all these years to finally, you know, collaborate on something. I did my thing in New York, so it’s nice to love connecting on this project.

This film also marks Ben working with Nick again, as you had previously worked with him and Joe Pickett on Winnebago Man.

Nick Pruher: When Ben walked up to us and said, “Hey, I’m making a movie about the angry RV guy,” we were like, “Well, we tried to track him down. Good luck.” Ben made the foolish decision to hire a private investigator to find him. It never crossed our minds. We were like, “This kid’s onto something.” I mean, Ben has about two years younger than us, but that kid’s got that moxie, I’m telling you.

We were impressed, above all, that Ben was able to infuse the documentary with something that we lack, namely the heart. So when we were in the middle of a trial and chatting with Ben, he just seemed like, “Hey, maybe this is a good opportunity for you to document this crazy time where our careers were on the line.” It was the genesis of the film.

Ben Steinbauer: Nick and Joe and I have been friends ever since Winnebago Man. I had followed their career, and they would come by Austin and play a show at the Drafthouse, and then we would meet up for a drink or something. We just stayed in touch. I was really fascinated by the pranks on the morning show, and then when the lawsuit happened, I think you contacted me right when the lawsuit was filed, basically. And that was the start of the film.

That’s when I was like, ‘Okay, pranks now have stakes, and there’s real substance here, and I have no idea what’s going to happen as a result .” For a long time it looked like it might be something where they were going to pull one last big prank or they were going to confront the man somehow, but what ended up happening was much more organic and truer and sweeter than anything that looked like a Borator one Yes man kind of approach.

Nick said you gave them heart, which they lacked, but Chop & Steele really shows the heart between you and Joe’s relationship and how you approach that stuff, Nick.

Nick Pruher: Yeah. It’s so natural since Joe and I have known each other since we were 10 years old. We don’t think about our relationship or what we do or anything, and the documentary almost forced us to step back and say, “Oh yeah, it’s kind of weird having a career with your childhood friend”, and “How do we navigate? We just don’t think about it, so it forced us – annoyingly – to face this for the first time.

The film shows your friendship, but what’s also fascinating about this documentary is that Priest and Ben met at KU, and then you and Joe met at the University of Wisconsin Eau Claire. It seems like a very nice synchronicity in all the relationships between the people who made this film.

Nick Pruher: Yeah. It’s also true. Maybe it’s not like that at KU but at University of Wisconsin Eau Claire we didn’t go to UW Madison which is like the big public school so other weirdos went to UW Madison. college with us, but you might do something ridiculous or dumb or start an intentionally bad break-dancing band and make waves.

If we had gone to NYU or Madison, even, it would have been considered kind of pat, but we could actually try some stupid ideas with very low stakes.

I think a lot of our creativity and the genesis of the Found Footage Festival really paid off in college because there just wasn’t much to do in our college town at the time. .

Well, you said that you came to this project because you liked the idea that there were stakes. These stakes play out on camera, and they are big, both legally and personally. How did all of you, as a very intimate group of people making this film, deal with the stress of all of this?

Ben Steinbauer: It was very similar to Winnebago Man that way where I honestly didn’t know what the ending was, and those are my favorite movies to make and watch. I love taking the audience on a ride and feeling like I’m in it with the filmmakers, and it’s really happening right in front of you. That’s how the movie was made.

We’ve had a lot of calls over many years about where the guys are at in their relationship and in their careers, and like I said, there were these ideas: maybe they’d go and pull these pranks more publicized and would deliberately come out and push the supporter and try to get sued again, and that could be the movie. Or were they really going to break up? There was just a lot of uncertainty around the movie the whole time.

The Howie Mandel interview is a good example. It was literally the last thing we shot. Until the end, when he sat in this interview, we didn’t know what he was going to say. We didn’t know if he knew why we were there. We didn’t know if he knew about Nick and Joe. We didn’t know if he would threaten to sue us because we were filming behind the scenes of America’s Got Talentyou know?

These kinds of unknowns are very stressful during production, but I’m lucky to have created a production company with my friends, with Berndt Mader, who is co-director of the film, and then I work with people like Priest and Nick and Joe, and it gives me the ability to work very small and scrappy, but to be able to take creative risks like this. I think it shows in the movie.

I think it’s a unique way of doing things. It’s not the most lucrative way in the world to do it, and probably not the smartest approach, but I think in this case it definitely worked.

Chop & Steele screens at Liberty Hall on Thursday, September 14, followed by a performance by the Found Footage Festival. Details about this event here.

Categories: Culture, Movies
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DIY, ASMR and Body Horror Melt into Disturbance https://acotonline.org/diy-asmr-and-body-horror-melt-into-disturbance/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/diy-asmr-and-body-horror-melt-into-disturbance/ Drafthouse Films knows Collider can’t resist an experimental horror movie, which is why they’ve shared an exclusive trailer for their upcoming film with us. Masking threshold. With a unique take on body horror and a different take on the genre, the film centers on a man who decides to personally examine a ringing in his […]]]>

Drafthouse Films knows Collider can’t resist an experimental horror movie, which is why they’ve shared an exclusive trailer for their upcoming film with us. Masking threshold. With a unique take on body horror and a different take on the genre, the film centers on a man who decides to personally examine a ringing in his ears and makes a gruesome discovery. Drafthouse Films also shared the film’s release date with Collider, which is set for September 30 on Alamo’s top sites, followed by a digital release on October 7.


The trailer for Masking threshold is unlike most horror trailers you’ve seen, and it showcases the experimental nature of the project. It highlights the fact that, in his quest to break down the way sound is perceived by the human ear, the protagonist and data analyst will experiment that involves listening closely to the sounds that everything produces, and how the sound of an object or being is affected by everything around it.

COLLIDER VIDEO OF THE DAY

It’s fun to watch the experiences until the trailer reminds us that we’re getting ready to watch some body horror – and then you have to get ready for the sights and sounds that come next, from dead animals to sharp objects. piercing body parts. And then it gets downright surreal with abstract imagery that we’ll definitely have to watch the movie to understand how they factor into the story.

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Masking threshold is directed by Austrian filmmaker Johannes Grenzfurthner, which is frequently acclaimed at horror and independent film festivals around the world. He has signed titles such as glossary of broken dreams and Trace route. The director created Masking threshold at Fantastic Fest 2021, where it received unanimous critical acclaim.

In an interview with Movie ThreatGrenzfurthner spoke about the inspiration for the film and revealed some surprising areas he drew on to create a disturbing story:

“I wanted to create a horror film that combines the conventions of the genre with the aesthetics of an experimental film. That’s why I use design tools like chamber game, unboxing video, science documentary and the DIY YouTube channel to unveil psychological and sculptural horror. If we look at the history of the horror genre, it has spawned a lot of innovation and the likes of which have never been seen before. I just have to remind you of the expressionist world and frightening of a “Nosferatu”, the spatial trepidation of “Alien” or the almost pornographic body horror of films like “Saw”. Again and again, aesthetic and visual spaces were opened up that were not possible or not yet established in other areas of the film world.At the same time, hardly any other genre is so narratively predictable and draws special power from the eternal return of the same.

Masking threshold opens theatrically exclusively with Alamo Drafthouse Cinemas on September 30 at top Alamo locations including New York, Los Angeles, Austin, San Francisco, Denver, and more. A week later, on October 7, the film becomes available nationwide digitally.

You can watch the trailer below:

Check out the official synopsis here:

Frustrated by a constant ringing in his ears, a paranoid data analyst documents his obsessive attempts to cure his own debilitating tinnitus through a series of home experiments conducted in a makeshift lab. But as his research grows darker and more gruesome, a horrific secret behind his infuriating condition is revealed along with a potential cure more sinister than he could have ever imagined. A deeply philosophical horror film inspired by weird fiction and Lovecraftian cosmicism, experimental filmmaker Johannes Grenzfurthner takes us on a disturbing journey into the paranoia of the human mind to reveal the disastrous consequences of the relentless pursuit of knowledge.

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The Invincible Czars Put A New Twist On A 100-Year-Old Vampire Movie https://acotonline.org/the-invincible-czars-put-a-new-twist-on-a-100-year-old-vampire-movie/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 16:30:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/the-invincible-czars-put-a-new-twist-on-a-100-year-old-vampire-movie/ In 1922, for the first time in history and in a moment of delightful irony, the power of bright light brought a vampire to life. F.W. Murnausilent film classic Nosferatus celebrates its cinematic centenary this year, and whether you’re a fan looking for another chance to see it on the big screen, a movie buff […]]]>

In 1922, for the first time in history and in a moment of delightful irony, the power of bright light brought a vampire to life. F.W. Murnausilent film classic Nosferatus celebrates its cinematic centenary this year, and whether you’re a fan looking for another chance to see it on the big screen, a movie buff booking in to catch up, or just a fan of goth noir anxiously counting the days until October, the Salt Lake Film Society offers you the chance to experience the film like you’ve never seen it, thanks to Josh Robin and Invincible Tsars.

“Being there on tour is weird because I’m working so I can’t go to Dracula’s castle at Lagoon.”

“Nosferatu is pretty much the first vampire movie,” says Robins. The German horror film tells the story of Count Orlok (Max Schreck), a vampire who plagues the city of Wisborg. Invincible Tsars is an instrumental and experimental rock band based in Austin, Texas, where they began developing and performing original music for existing silent film classics. The format was already gaining popularity at the famous Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in the late 90s and early 2000s. “We were part of a second wave of this trend,” says Robins. “Our first performance with a silent film was in the summer of 2006, and we kept adding more titles from there and getting further and further from home. only a few Alamo Drawing Houses, and as they grew, so did we. The band’s eclectic sound can be attributed to influences ranging from Pyotr Illyitch Tchaikovsky and Louis Aromstrong at Frank Zappa and Danny Elfman.

Invincible Tsarit started to turn with Nosferatus before in 2015, although between the combination of the centenary celebration, a revamped score and the chance to perform for live audiences again after an enforced hiatus due to COVID-19 makes 2022 a tour like no other , as the Tsars visit 49 cities across the continent. The current line up includes Robins on guitar, bass, samples and percussion, Phil Davidson on the violin, keyboards and percussion, Louis Landry on drums and keyboards and Zelda Young play the flute and clarinet.

“Nosferatu is pretty much the first vampire movie.”Mark your calendars for a chance to see Invincible Czars breathe new life into the silver screen's oldest vampire, Nosferatu.

Of all the cities that the Tsars are visiting, Salt Lake City is inherently special to Robins, who grew up in Kaysville. “I love coming back to Utah,” Robins says. “Being there on tour is weird because I’m working so I can’t go to Dracula’s castle at Lagoon.” For Robins, the tour is also a chance to introduce new people to Utah. “Salt Lake City is becoming more and more diverse compared to the image most people have in mind,” says Robins, adding that people tend to be surprised that you can actually find places to take A coffee.

Nosferatus: 100 years play in Salt Lake Film Society Center Broadway Theaters Saturday, September 10 at 7:30 p.m., with advance tickets available at slfstix.org. Be sure to mark your calendars, because you are missing the chance to see Invincible Tsars breathing new life into the silver screen’s oldest vampire would just suck. -Patrick Gibbs

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Regal Cinemas parent company files for bankruptcy protection https://acotonline.org/regal-cinemas-parent-company-files-for-bankruptcy-protection/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 19:07:08 +0000 https://acotonline.org/regal-cinemas-parent-company-files-for-bankruptcy-protection/ Cineworld Group, the world’s second-largest cinema operator and the parent company of Regal Cinemas, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy against creditors amid a severe box office downturn. The London-based firm said on Wednesday that the company and its subsidiaries had commenced proceedings in the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas in […]]]>

Cineworld Group, the world’s second-largest cinema operator and the parent company of Regal Cinemas, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy against creditors amid a severe box office downturn.

The London-based firm said on Wednesday that the company and its subsidiaries had commenced proceedings in the US Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Texas in an attempt to reduce its debts. Cineworld said it had secured $1.94 billion in new funding from existing lenders to ensure its continued operations during the reorganization and warned that restructuring its debt would lead to a “very significant dilution” of shareholder investments.

“The pandemic has been an incredibly difficult time for our business, with the forced closure of cinemas and a huge disruption to movie times that has gotten us to this point,” Cineworld chief executive Mooky Greidinger said in a statement. . “This latest process is part of our ongoing efforts to strengthen our financial position and targets deleveraging that will create a more resilient capital structure and an efficient business.”

The filing marks a dramatic retirement for Regal, which has been growing rapidly and has long been an iconic Southern California theater operator and also owns the Edwards and United Artists cinema brands.

But, like other cinema operators, the cinema giant has struggled to navigate the headwinds that have rocked the theater industry amid the COVID-19 pandemic and Hollywood’s rapid march towards streaming and watching movies at home.

Cineworld previously reported that it was exploring strategic options to deal with its substantial debt burden, as a promising start to the all-important summer movie season gave way to dramatically declining box office returns.

Hollywood productions such as “Top Gun: Maverick,” “Jurassic World Dominion,” and “Minions: The Rise of Gru” have brought throngs of patrons back to theaters, giving the industry a much-needed boost of confidence.

Lately, however, theater owners haven’t had much to celebrate.

Ticket sales fell dramatically in August after the lackluster debut of Sony Pictures’ Brad Pitt action flick “Bullet Train.”

There are few, if any, great all-ages movies coming from studios until October’s release of “Black Adam,” starring Dwayne Johnson as the DC Comics antihero. Several factors contributed to the thin release schedule, including COVID-19 production delays, a stall of unfinished films in visual effects houses, and the transition of many films to streaming services.

Theater owners have been hit hard by the pandemic, when government regulations forced movie theaters to close for months.

And Cineworld was facing a heavy debt load. He reported net debt of $10.35 billion as of June 22, or $5.16 billion excluding rental debt, according to the bankruptcy filing.

The company posted revenue of $1.8 billion last year, down from $4.4 billion in 2019, the year before the global public health crisis hit, regulatory filings show.

Cineworld said Aug. 17 that it was in “active discussions” with stakeholders to explore options for finding cash or restructuring its balance sheet.

“Despite a gradual recovery in demand since reopening in April 2021, recent admission levels have been below expectations,” the UK company said at the time. “These lower admissions levels are due to a limited film slate which is expected to continue through November 2022 and is expected to negatively impact trading and the group’s liquidity position in the near term.”

During its restructuring, the company said it plans to continue business as usual, with vendors, suppliers and employees being paid.

Cineworld plans to submit a reorganization plan to the court and exit Chapter 11 in 2023, he said. The plan includes renegotiating the cinema’s rental terms with its US owners, he said.

He said he expected his shares to continue trading on the London Stock Exchange.

This is not the first time that Regal has had problems with its creditors.

Regal Cinemas was founded in 1989 in Knoxville, Tennessee, and rode a wave of megaplex and multiplex construction in the 1990s.

As the industry faced a glut of giant theaters after years of overdevelopment, Regal declared bankruptcy in 2001 amid a wave of consolidation in the exhibition industry. Regal completed its Chapter 11 reorganization and emerged from bankruptcy in 2002 under the ownership of a group of investors led by billionaire Philip Anschutz, an LA Live developer with a state-of-the-art Regal multiplex.

In 2017, Regal agreed to be sold to Cineworld. The deal valued Regal at $3.6 billion.

Cineworld is not the first cinema operator to seek bankruptcy protection since the pandemic, but it is the largest to do so.

Pacific Theaters and ArcLight Cinemas filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy last year to liquidate the holdings. Leases of former ArcLight and Pacific theaters have been taken over by larger chains – including Regal, which took over the ArcLight at the Sherman Oaks Galleria last year.

Austin, Texas-based Alamo Drafthouse has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection, as has Dallas-based Studio Movie Grill. The two specialty channels then emerged from bankruptcy.

The aftermath of the pandemic has disturbed moviegoers in Los Angeles, the cinema capital of the world.

Laemmle Theaters relinquished the lease of its Playhouse 7 location in Pasadena, which was taken over by Landmark Theatres. Famous film destinations, the Cinerama Dome in Hollywood and the Vista Theater in Los Feliz, have been closed since March 2020 but are expected to reopen eventually.

AMC Theatres, the largest movie theater operator, also carries more than $5 billion in debt and faces the same box office climate as Regal.

However, an influx of very enthusiastic retail investors – colloquially known as “monkeys” – helped save Leawood company Kan. AMC strengthened its balance sheet by selling shares at high prices.

Times editor Anousha Sakoui contributed to this report.

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