Austin theatres – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ Wed, 13 Oct 2021 08:33:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://acotonline.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-4-120x120.png Austin theatres – Acotonline http://acotonline.org/ 32 32 New York Stage and Film Announces Founders Award and Pfaelzer Award Winners https://acotonline.org/new-york-stage-and-film-announces-founders-award-and-pfaelzer-award-winners/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 18:45:27 +0000 https://acotonline.org/new-york-stage-and-film-announces-founders-award-and-pfaelzer-award-winners/ New York Stage and Film announced today that Jeremy O’brian is the recipient of the 2021 Founders Award, a prestigious award that provides financial and administrative resources, as well as access to the NYSAF artist community. This year’s finalists for the Founders’ Award were Troy Anthony, Zeniba Now, Banna Desta, Gethsemane Herron-Coward, Katie Madison and […]]]>

New York Stage and Film announced today that Jeremy O’brian is the recipient of the 2021 Founders Award, a prestigious award that provides financial and administrative resources, as well as access to the NYSAF artist community. This year’s finalists for the Founders’ Award were Troy Anthony, Zeniba Now, Banna Desta, Gethsemane Herron-Coward, Katie Madison and Marcus Scott.

The Founders ‘Award recognizes an exceptional generative artist, in honor of the founders’ enduring commitment to nurturing emerging voices. The Founders Award is now selected by recent award recipients. This year’s committee included Ngozi Anyanwu, Keelay Gipson, Kirya Traber and Max Vernon. Recipients are offered $ 2,500, an extended NYSAF summer season residency in the Hudson Valley, and financial and administrative support for a project for which they are the sole curatorial voice. Jeremy o’brian will be hosting several events in the vicinity of World AIDS Day, including a conversation that demonstrates the multiplicity of available stories from black, gay and HIV-positive artists, which will be available as a live event and podcast audio for streaming. Jeremy will also offer a reading from his play Boys Don’t Look at Boys as a compliment to the previous conversation.

New York Stage and Film also announced that Elisa Bocanegra has been named the 2021 recipient of the Pfaelzer Award, created in honor of production manager Johanna Pfaelzer’s 20-year commitment to nurturing artists and their developing stories at New York Stage and Film.

The Pfaelzer Prize is selected in consultation with Johanna Pfaelzer and the recipient receives artistic and administrative support for projects of their choice throughout the year, culminating in a residency during the NYSAF summer season. The residency is supposed to include a reading, workshop, or other development activity that best supports the artist and their work. The recipient will be actively involved in NYSAF’s rich community of artists and artistic staff and will have the opportunity to benefit from Ms. Pfaelzer’s project mentorship.

“I am delighted to be working with New York Stage and Film,” said Founders Laureate Jeremy O’brian. “Boys don’t watch boys is a game of great importance, highlighting my deepest hope for a world where we normalize black boys by prioritizing vulnerability, gentleness and a deep esteem for self and the other. My time with NYSAF will be spent developing this play, and I’m excited to introduce myself to the New York theater community at a time that feels both new, exciting, and booming in their awareness of what might be. look like a true inclusion and representation. “

“I know firsthand the power of a great mentor. Olympia Dukakis was mine, and she encouraged me to start HERO Theater,” said Elisa Bocanegra, Pfaelzer recipient. “This new chapter in my career concerns the commissioning and development of new works. I am very honored to receive mentorship from Johanna Pfaelzer. fortunate.”

BIO OF THE FOUNDER’S AWARD WINNER:

Jeremy O’Brian is a first generation Mississippi-born penman. He received his Bachelor of Arts in English from Tougaloo College before attending and graduating from the University of Texas at Austin with a Master of Arts in African and African Diaspora Studies. He is the author and producer of the short film Sky blue (2021). He is the recipient of the Black Queer Fellowship of the Birmingham Black Repertory Theater Company (2020), the Liberation Theater Playwriting Residency Fellowship (2019), the Athena Theater’s Athena Writes Playwriting Fellowship (2018) and the Lambda Literary Emerging LGBTQ Voice in Playwriting Fellowship (2016). His pieces include: Egg; or anything dipped in a softened egg (Development: Athena Theater), a curious thing; or the k’ain’t fly superheroes (Workshop Production: JAGProductions), under one roof; or at home in mississippi (Development: Liberation Theater Co.), and boys don’t watch boys (Semi-finalist: Writing Scholarship from the Kingdom of the Playwright).

BIO WINNER OF THE PFAELZER PRIZE:

Elisa Bocanegra is a producer and actress who has now added directing to her credit. She is the founder of HERO Theater in Los Angeles. Elisa received a TCG Leadership U grant, which allowed her to serve on the Oregon Shakespeare Festival executive team for two seasons. His directing credits include TROIE, where she teamed up with homeless shelters around Los Angeles to raise awareness about the crisis. Other directing credits include The floating island plays by Eduardo Machado and a new project called Nuestro Planet. This ten-year New Multimedia Works initiative focuses on educating Latinx audiences about environmental justice in the Americas. Elisa was part of the NEXUS initiative at New York Stage and Film. As a performer, she has worked in numerous theaters including The Goodman Theater, Roundabout Theater Company, South Coast Rep, Center Theater Group, Hartford Stage, Oregon Shakespeare Festival and The Williamstown Theater Festival. His film debut was in the winner of the Sundance Film Festival, A battle between girls.

BIOS FOUNDER AWARD FINALIST:

Troy Anthony is a New York-based, Kentucky-born songwriter, director, and director practicing black queer joy. He has presented works at The Shed, Joe’s Pub, Musical Theater Factory (MTF), Rattlestick Playwright’s Theater, Prospect Theater Company and 54 Below. Commissions include The Public Theater, The Shed, Atlantic Theater Company and The Civilians. Troy has been seen in Hercules, Twelfth Night and As You Like It by the Public Theater. He is the founding director of The Fire Ensemble, where he focuses on the intersection of musical theater, community practice and social justice. He is also a 2019-2020 MTF maker and current MTF board member.

Banna Desta is an Eritrean and Ethiopian-American playwright and screenwriter who creates stories about and for the African Diaspora. For the stage, her short play Pining, a tragicomedy that explores the thrills and flaws of attraction, premiered at the Rattlestick Playwrights Theater and was released by Samuel French in 2019. For the screen, she is currently screenwriter for the BET + First Wives series. Club. Most recently, she wrote a short film for the Disney Discovers 2021 showcase, collaborating with the next wave of up-and-coming actors and directors in New York and Los Angeles. Previously, she wrote and co-produced the feminist and comedy short Akinyi + Yvonne, which made the official selection of many festivals. She received the John Golden Prize for Excellence in Drama Writing at NYU, where she received her MFA in Drama Writing.

Gethsemane Herron (she / she) is a playwright from Washington, DC She has developed work with JAG Productions, The Hearth, Magic Time @ Judson, The Ice Factory Festival at the New Ohio Theater, Playwright’s Playground at the Classical Theater of Harlem, The Fire This Time Festival, Roundabout Theater Company, WP Theater, Ars Nova and the Playwright’s Center, where she is Jérôme Fellow 2021-2022. Member of Ars Nova 2020-2022 playgroup and member of WP 2020-2022 theater lab. Additional residencies of The Liberation Theater Company, Virginia Center of the Creative Arts, VONA, Tofte Lake and Millay Colony, where she received the Yasmin Fellowship. Columbia award winner @ Roundabout 2020. Samuel French Off Off Broadway Short Play Festival winner. Finalist for the Van Lier alouette scholarship. MFA: Columbia University. Proud member of the Playwright’s Guild.

Katie Madison is a songwriter, writer, director, producer and musical theater artist currently based in Canarsie and Munsee Lenape, also known as Brooklyn. She is the recipient of a New York City Artist Corps Grant in 2021 and was chosen by The Downtown Alliance in conjunction with En Garde Arts and The Tank to reopen New York City in their first performance in direct after the pandemic. She was a resident of Critical Breaks with Hi-Arts in April 2021 and her work was commissioned by the Department of Musical Theater at the University of Michigan, Crossroads Theater Company, The American Opera Project, The Civilians, Milwaukee Skylight Theater, The Tank and Judson Memorial. Church. His show [ taking ] space was a 2019 Sundance Theater Lab finalist, and was one of three National Black Theater Soul Producting Residency finalists that same year. Find his digital work online // instagram: @kvmad // sound cloud:kvmad // www.kvmadison.com

Zeniba Now (her / Z) is an award-winning designer whose writings, musicals, songs and performances have been seen all over the world and on the internet. She describes herself as a musical storyteller and art scientist working in a variety of mediums on subjects ranging from liberating quantum science fiction to gynecological slapstick. Connect with Z’s work via www.zenibanow.com

Marcus Scott is a playwright, musical theater writer and journalist. selected works: Sibling Rivalries (Long-listed for the 2020 Theater503 International Playwriting Award; finalist for the 2021 Seven Devils Playwrights Conference and the 2021 ATHE-KCACTF Judith Royer Excellence In Playwriting Award; semi-finalist for the 2021 Blue Ink Playwriting Award and the 2021 New Dramatists Princess Grace Fellowship Award), Tumbleweed (Bay Area Playwrights Festival 2017 finalist; New Dramatists Princess Grace Fellowship Award 2017 semi-finalist), Cherry Bomb (2017 Drama League First Stage Artist-In-Residence recipient) and Sundown Town (Abingdon Theater Company’s Virtual Fall Festival of Short Pieces). His articles have appeared in Architectural Digest, Time Out New York, American Theater Magazine, Playbill, Elle, Out, Essence, The Brooklyn Rail, among others. Follow her: New Game Swap. Learn more about her on her blog: http://writemarcus.tumblr.com.



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Movies like the event M. Night Shyamalan fans must watch https://acotonline.org/movies-like-the-event-m-night-shyamalan-fans-must-watch/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 16:28:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/movies-like-the-event-m-night-shyamalan-fans-must-watch/ One of the most maligned films on this list, “Knowing” by Alexander Proyas is worth revisiting. Despite his critical beating, he received praise from Roger Ebert, who called “Knowing” “creepy, suspenseful, clever and, when needed, pretty awesome.” Nicolas Cage plays John Koestler, professor of astrophysics at the renowned MIT. After the unveiling of a time […]]]>

One of the most maligned films on this list, “Knowing” by Alexander Proyas is worth revisiting. Despite his critical beating, he received praise from Roger Ebert, who called “Knowing” “creepy, suspenseful, clever and, when needed, pretty awesome.”

Nicolas Cage plays John Koestler, professor of astrophysics at the renowned MIT. After the unveiling of a time capsule from 50 years ago at his son’s elementary school, Koestler discovers a strange series of numbers. The numbers reveal dates, coordinates and death tolls from disasters throughout history, all perfectly accurate. Two entries have yet to take place, which sends Koestler on a mission to see if he can change the course of action to prevent these tragedies from happening.

“Knowing” is worth seeing for its bravery performance of Cage, its unique sci-fi angle and its fascinating take on spirituality. Plus, “Knowing” has a pretty shocking ending and is a real conversation starter. While not all of the pieces fit together satisfactorily, there is something spectacular about the way “Knowing” goes about it in a way few Hollywood blockbusters dare.


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12 things to do in Toronto this week: October 12-17 https://acotonline.org/12-things-to-do-in-toronto-this-week-october-12-17/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 14:22:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/12-things-to-do-in-toronto-this-week-october-12-17/ With Thanksgiving out of the way, it’s time for the spookiest vacation of the year. Toronto loves Halloween, and there are a ton of things to do that will get you on your mind. Discover a haunted house, start preparing your costume, and have a drink at a themed bar. Here’s what’s happening for Toronto […]]]>

With Thanksgiving out of the way, it’s time for the spookiest vacation of the year. Toronto loves Halloween, and there are a ton of things to do that will get you on your mind.

Discover a haunted house, start preparing your costume, and have a drink at a themed bar.

Here’s what’s happening for Toronto this week:

Take a haunted tour of Fear Farm

The spookiest time of the year is fast approaching, and with it, the reopening of Toronto’s legendary haunted farmhouse. Fear Farm, located about an hour and a half outside of Toronto, welcomes guests for the spooky season. Courageous visitors can embark on four different haunted tours, including the Hillbilly Hike, which takes you through an eerie swamp full of chainsaw maniacs.

When: Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from September 25 to October 31
Or: 36685 Blenheim Road, Bright, Ontario

Face your fears at Martino Manor Haunted House

Are you looking for a haunted house that is not recommended for the faint of heart? Head west to Toronto and explore the neighborhood’s spookiest haunted house. Tickets are on sale for October, and it’s sure to scare you.

When: Until October 31
Or: 7 McIntosh Ave

Explore the city’s most haunted places

Beyond the ornate exteriors of Toronto’s oldest buildings lie gruesome tales of torture, murder and betrayal. From hanged maids to angry soldiers and faceless nuns, the city is teeming with ghosts. They are found in restaurants, theaters and on college campuses. With Halloween just a few weeks away, what better time to explore some of Toronto’s spookiest sites?

When: For the scary season
Or: Through the city

Get in the mood for Halloween at Canada’s Wonderland

Halloween Haunt is back and ready to scare. The event runs until October 31, so be sure to go to see the monsters for yourself and ride the roller coaster at night. Be ready for new scares this season, as the Monsters have had the whole pandemic to prepare for new ways to bump into the night.

When: Until October 31
Or: Canada’s Wonderland

Socially Distanced Sound Experience Now Open at Mirvish

Blindness, a physically distant sound experience, began on September 24 and will run until October 24. This is your chance to enjoy Toronto’s return to the indoor theater since the start of the pandemic. You can attend the show at different times from Tuesday to Sunday. The show lasts approximately 75 minutes. Customers should be prepared for loud noises and bright lights.

When: Until October 24
Or: Princess of Wales Theater

Venture into the horrors of Screemers

Toronto’s most terrifying haunted attraction returns next month with a new location and even spookier monsters. After failing to function last year due to COVID-19, the infamous Screemers are back with seven spooky themed mazes, over 120 spooky actors, and a Midway of Horrors.

When: Select dates from October 8 to 31
Or: 80 Interchange Lane, Vaughan

Be afraid of the horror legends of Casa Loma

Casa Loma, the elegant castle overlooking Toronto, has summoned the living dead and will bring back its annual Legends of Horror event this month. Throughout the month of October, fear and horror will pervade the castle grounds and guests can finally be afraid. The annual event is now in its sixth year, and tickets are now on sale.

When: October 1 to 31
Or: Casa Loma, 1 Austin Terrace

Discover the Black Lagoon Halloween pop-up bar

The ultimate Halloween pop-up bar is coming to Toronto just in time for a spooky vacation with all the themed drinks, spooky shows and nightly shows imaginable. Black Lagoon will be located on the second floor of 866 Bloor Street West and features a mix of goth, metal, and plenty of horrors bundled together in one immersive and fun space.

When: October 14 to October 31 from 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
Or: 866 Bloor Street West

Check out the seasonal activities at Fall n ‘Leaves 2021

Fall n ‘Leaves returns to Toronto for its second year. The outdoor event at a physical distance runs from October 1 to 17, celebrating all that falls. Soak up the warm weather while munching on delicious dishes like wood-fired pizza, Thanksgiving poutine served in a pumpkin, and more.

When: October 1 to 17, Monday to Friday 5 p.m. to 11 p.m., Saturday and Sunday noon to 12 a.m.
Or: 621 Richmond Street West

Dive into a cranberry swamp

A cranberry swamp near Toronto has just welcomed its first harvest. You can wade with the berries and later enjoy a cheese plate. Located at Muskoka Lakes Farm & Winery, Johnston’s Cranberry Marsh is the place to be for cranberry lovers, who can don a pair of waders and take the plunge with thousands of pounds of cranberries.

When: Until October 24
Or: 1074 Cranberry Road, Bala, Ontario

Get lost in the halls of horror

If you like to scare you, check out the Horror Hallways in Richmond Hill. “Enter if you dare”, and lose yourself in the abysses of hell. It might not sound alluring, but it is definitely exciting if you like everything there is to do with Halloween. Horror Hallways is so terrifying that it is not recommended for children.

When: Until October 31
Or: 9350 Yonge Street

Watch a live music show from a boat

This is the last week to see a live musical performance from a canoe on the Humber River. Paddle to see popular Toronto artists perform from the shore. Music season on the river is almost over, so grab this rental canoe while there is still time.

When: Until October 15
Or: Humber Paddling Center


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Moontower Comedy Festival: Jacqueline Novak wows the audience with the headliner “Get on Your Knees” https://acotonline.org/moontower-comedy-festival-jacqueline-novak-wows-the-audience-with-the-headliner-get-on-your-knees/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 22:55:26 +0000 https://acotonline.org/moontower-comedy-festival-jacqueline-novak-wows-the-audience-with-the-headliner-get-on-your-knees/ This article contains references to adult humor. After purchasing a ticket to Jacqueline Novak’s headlining show for the Moontower Comedy Festival, I had a few days to think about it and a lot of questions to ask. Namely, “Who is Jacqueline Novak?” And why is his comedy special called “Get on Your Knees”? I didn’t […]]]>

This article contains references to adult humor.

After purchasing a ticket to Jacqueline Novak’s headlining show for the Moontower Comedy Festival, I had a few days to think about it and a lot of questions to ask. Namely, “Who is Jacqueline Novak?” And why is his comedy special called “Get on Your Knees”?

I didn’t answer any of these questions before the show. It was partly procrastinating, and also because a lot of the reviews I tend to read come from commentary sections on social media, traditionally hotbeds of hypersexualization in female comics, whatever their routine.

When I finally walked into Paramount’s State Theater at around 9 p.m. on September 25, long strides and arm strokes along the theater-style flagstone steps took me down a hallway of fleeting memory of childhood film journeys. , then in my row. I took my seat and reflected on the spotlights shining in the center of the stage. It was so bright and so unswervingly intense on the microphone that, oddly enough, my the nerves began to heat up.

It was my first time taking part in a live comedy show. I had no idea what I was going to watch. In the seat to my right was a man in a Wu-Tang shirt, and immediately to my left was a couple in disguise sipping wine from plastic cups. Was I in the right place? “WHO IS JACQUELINE NOVAK?”. AND, WHY IS HIS COMEDY SPECIAL TITLE Get on your knees??

The theater has died out. Like a spectral hoop skirt, the spotlight pierced the darkness and Madonna’s “Like a Prayer” twinkled through the speakers. With a series of fun muscle flexes, Jacqueline Novak confidently turned to the microphone and tore it from the holder.

She greeted the crowd with a gentle introduction, commenting on the people still arriving and finding their place. She had obviously not started her set yet but her improvised performance was almost overactive, which I, a novice comedy lover, had to get used to quickly (but I ended up enjoying). After most of the spectators entered, she seemed ready to start the show. But, the man in the Wu-Tang shirt stood up, and in a voice that could have been honestly disheartened, Novak asked him where he was going: “Explosive diarrhea,” he said, in which could have been an honest answer.

I managed to understand a fragment of Jacqueline Novak. Now it was time to understand why the show is called “Get on Your Knees”:

It’s about blowjobs. So much so that, according to Novak, one reviewer called it tedious.

Through Novak’s words, she recounts how her courage as a young woman never ceased to blossom, even when the penises she met bloomed then withered, bloomed then withered. Her theatrical and exuberant stage presence keeps your eyes moving as what you hear takes you from sex education with her friend’s older sister to carpeted basements with a high school boyfriend. Finally, after recounting how pseudo-reading Russian novels and sitting on a window sill reflecting on her philosophy classes in college helped her vocabulary, she has a conversation in a restaurant with one of her high school buddies, the other half of her first blowjob.

This is where his oral history takes a turn. The boyfriend reveals that his confidence may have been for nothing. His enthusiasm may have been misplaced. His pipes were to the fullest. On stage, she collapses, literally lying on the stage and talking to the ceiling, wondering why she made such a big mistake.

But, like a penis, after she withered to the ground, it was time to bloom again. She stood up and her voice grew bolder as she relived the dinner conversation. Her message to her ex-boyfriend became clearer: the teeth were the key to the pipe. Teeth were the only reason any man could even distinguish a pipe from any other sexual act. Contrary to what others believed, for her, the teeth were poetic: which enriched the experience. The teeth were amazing, and because they were amazing, she’s amazing. Jacqueline Novak is the queen of the pipe.

Now … was I in the right place? When I arrived, maybe. The crowd was a bit older than me and sometimes laughed when I didn’t. A few burps of wine also made their way into my nostrils. When I thought about it a bit more, however, there was so much to love about this show.

Whether you were part of a blowjob or not, at “Get on Your Knees” you will feel like part of the crowd anyway and be able to witness some of the most concise, confident and creative concerts. . -stories that could exist on this planet. There were stimulating metaphors and abstract imagery around every corner, and with each deeper punchline throughout Novak that she gets, you’ll dig deeper into your seat.

Was I in the right place? Yes. This show was tedious, toothy and I enjoyed every second of my blown mind.

Note: 5 out of 5 goats


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New Manifest Theater Company Celebrates Dramatic Writing with Third Annual Short-Piece Festival, MANIFEST MINIFEST https://acotonline.org/new-manifest-theater-company-celebrates-dramatic-writing-with-third-annual-short-piece-festival-manifest-minifest/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 15:22:51 +0000 https://acotonline.org/new-manifest-theater-company-celebrates-dramatic-writing-with-third-annual-short-piece-festival-manifest-minifest/ The new Manifest theater company will be back with the third annual Manifest Minifest short piece festival October 13-16, 2021. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s event will be streamed for free on YouTube. Donations are accepted. This year’s event highlights the work of four playwrights and features two new panel discussions. The […]]]>

The new Manifest theater company will be back with the third annual Manifest Minifest short piece festival October 13-16, 2021. Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, this year’s event will be streamed for free on YouTube. Donations are accepted.

This year’s event highlights the work of four playwrights and features two new panel discussions. The festival kicks off on October 13 with Ezequiel González Camaño’s play, Freshwater Grass. Immediately afterwards, artists Ang Bey and Toni Robinson will host “Curating Inclusive Creative Spaces”, a panel discussion on the importance of diversity in theater.

On October 14, New Manifest will feature Sandy Lam’s drama, Twitter Feed. Afterwards, the actors Oktavea LaToi and Taji Senior will host “Solo Show: Page To Stage”, a panel on the creation of individual shows.

The New Manifest Theater Company will also present Principal’s Office by Cris Eli Blak and Love is a Rollercoarster by Rita Anderson. Participants have the opportunity to watch reruns of two previous panels of the Minifest: the early-career production workshop of Rudy Ramierez and Iyvon Edebiri and the playwriting discussion of Idris Goodwin and Kristiana Rae Colón.

All four plays were professionally filmed at the Ground Floor Theater in Austin, Texas. Although actors often miss the thrill of a live audience, Simone Alexander champions the importance of virtual performances.

“I hope we can continue to take advantage of this accessibility even when it is safe to meet in large groups,” Alexander said.

Supported by the Ensemble Theaters Network, Manifest Minifest continues to strengthen the mission of the company as a whole. And even though theater has stalled across the country, Alexander believes inspiration and community are always close at hand.

“Through our panels, we are able to bring together regional artists to share their experiences in cultivating artistic communities and creating works during a pandemic,” said Alexander.


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Animation Is Film reveals jurors and special events https://acotonline.org/animation-is-film-reveals-jurors-and-special-events/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 20:02:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/animation-is-film-reveals-jurors-and-special-events/ Animation is a movie (AIF) has announced the festival’s jury and special event lineup for its fourth edition, which will take place in person October 22-24, returning to her home at the TCL Chinese 6 Theaters in Hollywood. The festival kicks off the opening night with the North American premiere of the highly anticipated Netflix […]]]>

Animation is a movie (AIF) has announced the festival’s jury and special event lineup for its fourth edition, which will take place in person October 22-24, returning to her home at the TCL Chinese 6 Theaters in Hollywood. The festival kicks off the opening night with the North American premiere of the highly anticipated Netflix feature film, The Summit of the Gods, followed by an in-person question-and-answer session with award-winning director Patrick Imbert (The big bad fox and other tales).

On October 23, the festival will present the West Coast premiere of GKIDS ‘ Beautiful, directed by Oscar nominated Mamoru Hosoda (Mirai) who will also do an in-person question-and-answer session after the premiere. The West Coast Premiere of the Award-Winning NEON Film To flee, directed by Jonas Poher Rasmussen, will close the festival on October 24.

Tickets for Animation Is Film are now on sale at animationisfilm.com.

Also announced are the jury members for this year’s festival, special events and the hugely popular Annecy International and Women in Animation program. LAIKA will also host a showcase of the five award-winning animation studio feature films presented in an exhibition in the TCL Hall; characters include: Coraline, Paranormand, Boxtrolls, Kubo and the two strings and Missing link.

“This year’s Animation Is Film jury is made up of a panel of outstanding industry professionals whose uniqueness and diversity match the programming of the competition itself,” said festival director Matt Kaszanek. “They are a really wonderful group, and we are honored to have them.”

JUROR 2021

  • Myke Chilian – Los Angeles-based animator, screenwriter, writer, voice actor, and musician. He is the creator and executive producer of the HBO series Max, Tig is not looking, which is produced by Cartoon Network Studios.
  • Deborah Cook – Originally from England, Cook designed and made costumes for every LAIKA movie (Coraline, Paranormand, Boxtrolls, Kubo and the two strings and Missing link).
  • Peter Debruge – Variety’s chief international film critic and graduate of the Film Studies program at the University of Texas at Austin.
  • Sandra Equihua – Graduated from IBERO University with a BA in Graphic Design, she has worked as a graphic designer, illustrator and character designer alongside her husband, Jorge Gutierrez, at companies such as WB, Disney, Nick JR and Nickelodeon. She continues her career as a character designer for the animated film The book of life and she is currently working for Netflix on the animated series Maya and the Three.
  • Dan Krall – An Emmy and Annie award-winning artist, producer and artistic director, he is currently a consultant producer on Gremlins: Secrets of the Mogwai, the upcoming animated series produced by Warner Bros. Animation and Amblin Television. Previous credits include popular titles such as Dexter’s lab, Super girls, Jack Samurai, Chowder, Coraline, and Scooby Doo! Incorporated mystery.
  • Kristin Lowe – Creative Director, Features for DreamWorks Animation, Lowe oversees feature film development, casting and artistic management for the studio’s renowned feature film division. DreamWorks Animation’s next 2022 feature list includes The villains, and The puss in boots: the last wish, the sequel to the 2011 Oscar nominated blockbuster.
  • Erick Oh – Oscar nominated Korean filmmaker based in California, Oh’s films have been screened and awarded at numerous film festivals including the Oscars, Annie Awards, Annecy Animation Festival, Film Festival from Zagreb, SIGGRAPH, Anima Mundi and more. Erick became an animator at Pixar Animation Studios from 2010 to 2016. Erick’s last film Opera was nominated for the Oscar and his next project Namoo premiered at the Sundance Film Festival this year.
  • Ray Pride – Longtime film critic of Chicago arts monthly Newcity and editor of Filmmaker magazine. His Chicago story “Ghost Signs” in words and pictures will be published in 2022.
  • Raye Rodriguez – Creator and Executive Producer of the upcoming Crunchyroll Original series Elevated Guardian Spice. He graduated from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and began his career as a director, screenwriter, and character designer at Fox Animation Domination High-Definition (Fox ADHD).
  • Charles Solomon – Respected animation critic and historian, Solomon has written on the subject for The New York Times, Newsweek (Japan), Rolling Stone, Los Angeles Times, The International Herald Tribune, Variety, Manchester Guardian and National Public Radio. His books include “The Art of Frozen”, “The Art of Disney’s Guest Books”, “The Toy Story Movies: An Animated Journey”, “A Tale As Old As Time: Art and the making of the Disney animated classic Beauty and the Beast ”,“ The Art of Toy Story 3 ”,“ Enchanted Cartoons: The Story of Animation ”.
  • Ramin Zahed – Editor-in-chief for Animation Magazine, Zahed is an LA-based author and journalist who specializes in animation, visual effects, pop culture and independent films. He has written for Variety, The Hollywood Reporter, Los Angeles Times, Sight and Sound, and others.

BEST OF ANNECY: FOCUS ON WOMEN CINÉASTES

The start of an international showcase of animated short films for women in 2021, organized in partnership with WIA and Annecy. This program offers a wide range of beautiful and vibrant storytelling experiences that cover a wide variety of topics and artistic styles – a concise yet compelling presentation of the vision and voice of women in the global animation community. today.

  • No leaders please – directed by Joan Gratz (United States)
    The inspired works of artists Basquiat, Banksy, Haring and Ai Weiwei represent the self-invented theme of Bukowski’s poem.
  • Art business – directed by Joanna Quinn (UK, Canada)
    Beryl is back Art Affairs, which showcases a family’s quirky yet endearing obsessions with everything from screw thread drawing and pet taxidermy.
  • It is raining (Lluève) – directed by Carolina Corral Paredes and Magali Rocha Donnadieu (Mexico)
    Is this what mass graves look like, one body over another and nothing else? In the rain, Oliver sends signals to his mother to help her uncover the truth.
  • How to be at home – directed by Andrea Dorfman (Canada)
    Lean into solitude – and know that you are not alone. Filmmaker Andrea Dorfman reunites with poet Tanya Davis to create tender and deep isolation-themed animation, providing a wise and lyrical sequel to their viral success. How to be alone.
  • What Resonates In The Silence (What resonates in the silence) – directed by Marine Blin (France)
    Hiding death does not make it disappear. A young girl suffers from the silences of adults and feels dispossessed of her right to mourn. As an adult, she describes the tender gestures that bind her to the dead.
  • The Awakening of Insects (The awakening of insects) – directed by Stéphanie Lansaque (France).
    Mr. Lam is an old man, losing his memory since the death of his wife. On the last day of the “insect hibernation”, he receives an unexpected visit from Ms. Meng, a Taoist exorcist determined to drive demons from his head.

ANIMATION IS A FILM: VIRTUAL PROGRAM

Free and available for viewing on AnimationIsFilm.com during the festival.

Baobab Studios’ Namoo: A conversation with Eric Darnell and Erick Oh

  • Join Baobab Studios Creative Director Eric Darnell and Erick Oh, the Oscar nominated director of their latest animated short, Namoo, talking about their respective backgrounds within major studios such as DreamWorks Animation and Pixar, embracing new technologies and working in the world of independent cinema. They will discuss their creative freedom from an artistic perspective, as well as the biggest challenges they faced along the way. They will eventually immerse themselves in the creation of the studio’s latest animated short, Namoo, simultaneously for theatrical and VR platforms. Using one of the latest cutting edge animation tools, Quill, along with real-time technology, Namoo – translated as ‘tree’ in Korean – is a handmade narrative poem that follows the beautiful and heartbreaking moments in a man’s life from start to finish.

Animation in video games

  • As video games continue to push the boundaries of narrative animation, Slate’s Allegra Frank leads a discussion about the importance of 2D character design and development in video game storytelling.

Mamoru Hosoda: In conversation with Leonard Maltin

  • On the occasion of the West Coast premiere of his latest film, BeautifulOscar-nominated Mamoru Hosoda chats with critic Leonard Maltin for an in-depth discussion about his career and the new film.

Tale as old as the world: The beauty and the Beast 30 years

  • To celebrate the 30th anniversary, producer Don Hahn hosts a chat with directors Gary Trousdale and Kirk Wise about making a modern animated classic and its legacy 30 years later.

Source: Animation is a movie

Dan Sarto's photo

Dan Sarto is publisher and editor-in-chief of Animation World Network.


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New cinemas, VOD and streaming: October 8-10, 2021 https://acotonline.org/new-cinemas-vod-and-streaming-october-8-10-2021/ Fri, 08 Oct 2021 10:22:11 +0000 https://acotonline.org/new-cinemas-vod-and-streaming-october-8-10-2021/ Including the Lamb, No Time to Die, Rescue, and the events before, after and during a high school basketball game Lamb (Valdimar Jóhannsson) You won’t be surprised to learn that Lamb is the latest high genre image from US distributor A24, who has built a reputation on the bespoke weirdness of projects like Ari Aster’s […]]]>

Including the Lamb, No Time to Die, Rescue, and the events before, after and during a high school basketball game


Lamb

(Valdimar Jóhannsson)

You won’t be surprised to learn that Lamb is the latest high genre image from US distributor A24, who has built a reputation on the bespoke weirdness of projects like Ari Aster’s Hereditary and Midsommar and A Ghost Story and The Green Knight by David Lowery, among others. . Lamb is a Scandinavian import that fits right on this hand-carved craft shelf, a folk tale in modern costume about childless farmers (Noomi Rapace, -Hilmir Snær Guðnason) welcoming an unlikely newborn baby and l ‘raise like theirs. The nature of this newborn is hidden from us for a good 40 minutes, as Jóhansson – who co-wrote the screenplay with Björk Sjón’s frequent collaborator – slowly and cautiously draws us into his story, Rapace and Guðnason selling the effect. long before we see it. this. Lamb is a tightrope walker between the sublime and the absurd, achieved with a mixture of puppets, CG and tone. And while the whole thing ultimately looks like a short stretched over a feature film, the accomplishment is impressive. 106 minutes Subtitled. Now playing in theaters. NNN (Norman Wilner)

No time to die

(Cary Joji Fukunaga)

The 25th official James Bond film is Daniel Craig’s fifth and final outing in the role. I love Craig’s Bond – the actor captures the brutality and cruelty so central to Ian Fleming’s character design – but his films don’t know what to do with him. James Bond has become an ambitious figure, trapped in the same superhero narrative as any Marvel or DC character: he can’t really change or grow, because that would stop everything. And across five films, the odd insistence that what this dead-eyed assassin really wants is to be part of a family – whether it’s the working family he built at MI-6, or other elements hanging all over the place – pushed against Craig’s performance in an interesting and frustrating way, as if the actor, rather than the character, were rejecting the premise. Additionally, the plot details of this film are both too familiar and incomprehensible: No Time To Die wants to be a high Bond film, but that sort of stance shows some contempt for the company; maybe, just maybe, focus on making a Bond movie that moves, that rocks, that doesn’t keep all of its bolder choices for the last five minutes, and it’ll rise. 163 minutes Some subtitles. Now playing in theaters. NN (NO)

The rescue

(Elizabeth Chai Vasarhelyi, Jimmy Chin)

Free Solo directors Vasarhelyi and Chin follow this Oscar-winning documentary with this look at the 2018 Tham Luang rescue, in which a handful of British cave divers came to Thailand to retrieve a trapped football team and coach. a system of flooded caves. Given the access to the divers and the hours and hours of footage filmed during the effort, Vasarhelyi and Chin compress a three-week operation into two crisp hours, reflecting both the terrifying scale of the challenge and the sheer scale of the challenge. ingenuity required to achieve it. all the work. (If you’re claustrophobic, you probably stopped reading this review as soon as you figured out what the movie was about, but if you’re still around, yeah, it’s intense.) I could have done without the use liberal reenactments; Towards the end, when The Rescue shows us a diver struggling to keep his young protege alive while talking about their utter loneliness, recreating that moment for a camera that couldn’t have been present seems almost obnoxious – but it’s a minor blow against an otherwise brilliantly orchestrated film. 114 minutes Some subtitles. Playing at the Ted Rogers Hot Docs Cinema. NNNN (NO)

Events that take place before, during, and after a high school basketball game


(Ted Stenson)

There isn’t much going on in Events Transpiring Before…, really. There’s a basketball game, obviously, but the movie doesn’t really care about whether the Middleview Ducks are going to win this one; the game is just a toss for all the weirdos in the building. There are many. Some of them are adults, like the referee (Jay Morberg) who is distracted by the fact that he brought a small dog to the game, or the assistant trainer (Andrew Phung), who is full of ingenious games and strategies that it cannot articulate in a coherent way. And some of them are kids, like the theater troupe who are considering crashing the game with a protest against their canceled production of King Lear, but continue to be distracted by the nature of the protest. (Should there be signs? Should there be nudity? Isn’t the gym a bit cold?) The basketball team has its fair share of eccentrics, and all their stories end up bouncing on top of each other. It’s kind of a sweet chaos, and writer / director Stenson films it all in long, contemplative takes, like if we stare at these characters long enough, they might suddenly start to make sense. They don’t, but the extended shots become their own racing gag, setting us up to hunt for the next silliness bursting into the frame. 75 minutes. Now available on VOD platforms. NNNN (NO)

Available on VOD

Bayou blue

Justin Chon, Alicia Vikander, Mark O’Brien; directed by Justin Chon

Read the review of NOW here

Apple tv, Cineplex, Google Play

Decisive moments

Burt Reynolds, Sienna Guillory, Eric Peterson; directed by Stephen Wallis

Apple tv, Cineplex, Google Play

Events that take place before, during, and after a high school basketball game

Andrew Phung, Catherine Gell, Paul Cowling; directed by Tim Stenson

Apple tv, google play

The night house

Rebecca Hall, Sarah Goldberg, Vondie Curtis Hall; directed by David Bruckner

Read the review of NOW here

Apple tv, Cineplex, google play

Old

Gael Garcia-Bernal, Vicky Krieps, Rufus Sewell; directed by M. Night Shyamalan

Read the NOW review

Apple tv, Cineplex, google play

Pharma Bro

Documentary directed by Brent Hodge

Apple tv, Google Play

The protected

Maggie Q, Samuel L. Jackson, Michael Keaton; directed by Martin Campbell

Apple tv, Cineplex, google play

Summer time

Austin Antoine, Bryce Banks, Mila Cuda; directed by Carlos López Estrada

Apple tv, Google Play

V / H / S / 94

Anthology film directed by Jennifer Reeder, Chloe Okuno, Simon Barrett, Timo Tjahjanto and Ryan Prows

Thrill Canada

The year of the eternal storm

Anthology film directed by Anthony Chen, David Lowery, Jafar Panahi, Laura Poitras, Dominga Sotomayor, Malik Vitthal and Apichatpong Weerasethakul

Apple tv, Google Play

Streaming guides

Everything coming to streaming platforms this month:

Netflix

Very wanting to

CBC Gem

Disney +

Film festival

Toronto Independent Horror Festival

October is packed with horror festivals, and this one – which takes place in the Eyesore Cinema (1176 Bloor West) – presents an international selection of feature films and shorts, including a program of Women In Horror shorts (Saturday , 6:30 p.m.) and the closing feature Were-Wool (Saturday, 9 p.m.), by Ontario filmmaker Lucas Birnie. And yes, that one is exactly what you think it is.

Until Saturday (October 9) at Eyesore Cinema (1176 Bloor West). Tickets available through Film Freeway. toindiehorrorfest.com

Disc of the week

It’s October, so of course we’re going to be highlighting this brilliant act of creature resurrection – though it’s nowhere near as complete as it should be. This set brings together four of Universal’s greatest monster movies – Tod Browning’s Dracula, Frankenstein and James Whale’s The Invisible Man and George Waggner’s The Wolf Man – and delivers them in ultra-high-definition masters that are almost pristine in all their glory. in black and white.

Ninety years after their arrival, Dracula and Frankenstein are still wonderful experiences; It’s still astonishing that Frankenstein – with his adventurous camera work and arching performances – arrived barely four years after the Age of Sound began. (Browning’s Dracula looks a lot older, although that probably has more to do with his scenic origins and more deliberate pacing; the Spanish-language version, shot on the same sets with a different cast and crew, has a more alive – and it’s also included here in 4K.) The Wolf Man and The Invisible Man are perhaps less iconic, but still very entertaining, thanks to Lon Chaney Jr’s misery as poor Laurence Talbot and the joy which Claude Rains’ transparent maniac frolics around the soundstages in Whale’s other historic monster movie, which is sort of even more fun when you can just glimpse the mechanics of the invisibility effects.

Universal’s box set includes 4K and Blu-ray discs for every feature, with all of the extras produced for previous editions carried across both formats – audio commentaries, documentaries, retrospectives, even Philip Glass’s alternate score for Browning’s Dracula. commissioned by Universal and recorded by the Kronos Quartet in 1998.

It’s a bit annoying that Universal’s love for four-packs means it will probably be another year before the equally essential quartet of The Mummy, The Bride Of Frankenstein, The Creature From The Black Lagoon and The Phantom Of The Opera doesn’t arrive in UHD, but if there’s one thing these monsters are good at, it’s waiting in the dark. They will eventually slip away.

@normwilner



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‘Frozen’ production tour makes a brilliant return to Twin Cities – Twin Cities https://acotonline.org/frozen-production-tour-makes-a-brilliant-return-to-twin-cities-twin-cities/ Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/frozen-production-tour-makes-a-brilliant-return-to-twin-cities-twin-cities/ Although audiences stumble through the new reality of theater (vaccination checks, masks, etc.), the touring production of “Frozen” that hit the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis this weekend did it in full force. diet. After being taken off the route about 18 months ago due to COVID-19 restrictions, the tour relaunched last month in Buffalo, with […]]]>

Although audiences stumble through the new reality of theater (vaccination checks, masks, etc.), the touring production of “Frozen” that hit the Orpheum Theater in Minneapolis this weekend did it in full force. diet.

After being taken off the route about 18 months ago due to COVID-19 restrictions, the tour relaunched last month in Buffalo, with the Twin Cities serving as the second stop – and a homecoming for Caroline Innerbichler , the former local at the head of the tour in the role of Anne.

In the pantheon of Disney films adapted for the stage, “Frozen” lacks the dazzling imaginative spectacle of its predecessors. Olaf the Snowman (a handsome F. Michael Haynie), for example, is anthropomorphized using the same technique that brought Timon the Meerkat to life in “The Lion King”. Sven the Reindeer (Collin Baja, alternating in the silent role with Evan Strand) would not seem out of place in the menagerie of this show.

As for the trolls – the mystical, magical, rock race that aided the royal house of Arendelle in the film? They are reimagined for the stage as some sort of nonspecific, wild-haired, scantily clad native people, which feels both vaguely culturally extravagant and a wasted creative opportunity.

That said, there’s a pretty skillful mix of the familiar from the movie and the new in “Frozen.”

Oaken, who made an appearance in the first film as a clumsy trading post operator, opens the second act with “Hygge.” This is the best of the songs added for the staging: a party-cum-fan polka dance, with Scandinavians emerging from a sauna clown car, happily flogging each other with birch branches. Michael Milkanin, a hash maestro, doesn’t waste the opportunity to steal a scene. But, I hear you ask, how are the princesses?

Audiences who might have seen Innerbichler in lead roles in Ordway’s “Mamma Mia” or Chanhassen Dinner Theaters’ “The Little Mermaid” understand that she has one of those ineffable senses of stage presence that effortlessly draws the look. Her Anna is a classic Disney princess via “Oklahoma’s” Teen Annie – lanky, a little rough around the edges and ready for all kinds of adventures.

Innerbichler is at her best when she multiplies her energy by playing with talented partners. Her duet with Hans (Austin Colby, appropriately heroic until… you know… he’s not) in “Love is An Open Door” is dizzying and charming, filled with air and wit.

I would say the role of Elsa – the magical princess who becomes Snow Queen – is written with less scope and less dimension. It’s not against Caroline Bowman. Hers is a strong, grounded performance, and his thrilling take on the ubiquitous “Let It Go” (one of the show’s few truly gee-whiz technical moments) is everything a fan of the song could wish for. .

Although it has been off the road for a long time, the company shows no signs of rusting. Saturday night’s press night performance was the second of a day of two shows, and the cast and orchestra looked and sounded like they could do a third midnight show with energy at resell. They seemed happy to be back on the road. And it’s good to get them back.

  • What: The traveling production of “Frozen”
  • When: Until October 20
  • Or: Orpheum Theater, 910 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis
  • Tickets: $ 40 – $ 150 +
  • Information: 800-982-2787 or hennepintheatretrust.org
  • Checkup: Identity document, vaccination (from 12 years old) and mask compulsory. Pre-check available two
    hours before the show
  • Capsule: Traveling theater is making a resounding comeback in the Twin Cities.


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Austin Concert Halls Receive $ 113 Million in COVID Relief Grants https://acotonline.org/austin-concert-halls-receive-113-million-in-covid-relief-grants/ Wed, 29 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/austin-concert-halls-receive-113-million-in-covid-relief-grants/ The federal government has distributed more than $ 113 million in aid to struggling Austin concert halls through the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant, according to the latest data from the US Small Business Administration. Why is this important: Concert halls in Austin and across the country have been forced to close due to the pandemic, […]]]>

The federal government has distributed more than $ 113 million in aid to struggling Austin concert halls through the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant, according to the latest data from the US Small Business Administration.

Why is this important: Concert halls in Austin and across the country have been forced to close due to the pandemic, leaving independent venues particularly at risk of permanent closure.

More than 100 Austin locations have received assistance under the program, according to the latest data available as of September 20.

  • The University of Texas got $ 9 million, the largest grant distributed among Austin sites.
  • City-wide favorites like Stubbs, Alamo Drafthouse, Violet Crown Cinemas, South by Southwest and Austin City Limits C3 Management music festival organizer also received funding under the program.

Zoom out: Nearly 700 Texas sites have raised $ 767 million in aid since April.

The Shuttered Venue Operators Grant program is part of the Save Our Stages Act, a bipartisan legislation of the American senses John Cornyn of Texas (R) and Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota (D) which was enacted last December.

  • Only small, closed and at-risk sites are eligible for federal funding of $ 16.2 billion. The amount of the subsidy can be equal to 45% of the gross income of the enterprise.
  • Site operators can use the subsidies for rent, utilities, mortgage obligations, and other operating and administrative costs.

What they say: Austen Bailey of Mohawk said the program couldn’t arrive early enough for the venue, which had to put its staff on leave just days after being forced to shut down in March 2020. Mohawk Austin has been closed for about 14 months month, to reopen in May.

  • “Without federal funding, independent live music would not exist. Period, “said Bailey, who lobbied lawmakers to pass the measure.” It’s the same for Mohawk as it is for other independent venues. “
  • The Mohawk received $ 1.2 million under the Shuttered Venue Operators Grant Program.

Austin Theater Alliance, the non-profit organization that operates Paramount and Stateside theaters, has received more than $ 4.1 million through the program.

  • The boost allowed the association to rehire staff, restore reduced salaries and bring back artists.
  • “Would the 105-year-old Paramount Theater shut down? No. Would it have been seriously injured? Absolutely,” said Jim Ritts, CEO and executive director of the Austin Theater Alliance. “It would have taken us years to recover.


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GEORGE WENNING Obituary (1962 – 2021) – Austin, TX https://acotonline.org/george-wenning-obituary-1962-2021-austin-tx/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://acotonline.org/george-wenning-obituary-1962-2021-austin-tx/ George Edward Wenning (G. Austin) died on August 11, 2021 at his home in Austin, Texas. George was born in Marietta, GA in 1962, raised as an Air Force kid living in Georgia, Hawaii, Ohio and Texas. He attended the St. Augustine HS in Laredo, TX and the University of Texas at Austin. His soul […]]]>

George Edward Wenning (G. Austin) died on August 11, 2021 at his home in Austin, Texas.

George was born in Marietta, GA in 1962, raised as an Air Force kid living in Georgia, Hawaii, Ohio and Texas.

He attended the St. Augustine HS in Laredo, TX and the University of Texas at Austin. His soul was kind, generous and caring. He was a talented and charismatic member of the theatrical scene. He opened his first backyard theater company at the age of 8 and performed with the Bayanihan Dance Troupe in high school. Throughout his adult life he worked primarily in Austin, both behind and in front of the curtain. And we have the fake lasagna accessory to prove it! Her favorite prop rating was “It’s not funny enough. Paint it red.” Early in his career he performed with Laredo Little Theater, UT Drama and Zilker Hillside Theater. An accomplished master of properties, he has worked with the Austin Ballet, Austin Lyric Opera, UT PAC, Texas Renaissance Festival and various theaters across the country including La Jolla Playhouse, Greater Miami Opera, Utah Festival Opera, Utah Shakespearean Festival, Alley Theater in Houston. , Denver Center Theater, Shakespeare Theater in Washington DC and Seattle Shakespeare Company. He was a member of IATSE Local 205.

He is predeceased by his mother, Mary Alyce Corrigan (2002) and his father, USAF Lt. Col. (retired) Jack H. Wenning (2019).

He is survived by his sister Anita Wenning Rothwell (GF Rothwell V) of Bethesda, MD, and his brother Patrick Wenning (Bill Toscano) of Silver Spring, MD, and his niece Caitlin Rothwell (Bethesda, MD), nephew Gideon Franklin Rothwell VI (NYC) and several cousins. He also leaves behind a large family of friends.

Due to COVID, a memorial will be held at a later date. Memorial contributions can be made to the following organizations: Austin Opera https://my.austinopera.org/donate/contribute1, Austin Ballet https://my.balletaustin.org/donate/contribute1, and Austin Pets Alive!… Because ‘he has always had a thing for animals and has welcomed many stray animals into his home.

https://www.austinpetsalive.org/donate/donate-tribute

Good memories and expressions of sympathy can be shared at

www.cookwaldenfuneralhome.com for the Wenning family.

Posted by Express-News on September 24, 2021.


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